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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7310_CLAIRE MAX_3M ADAPTIVE OPTICS / LASER GUIDE STAR 

     

    2015 January 5

    Read about PHOTOGRAPHING THE LASER


    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS / LASER GUIDE STAR • AO/LGS •ShARCS

    This image was photographed at Lick Observatory on 2015 January 5. University of California Observatories Interim Director Claire Max is inside the Shane 3m dome while the Adaptive Optics Laser Guide star is propagating.

    Note that the sky is a purple-blue color, with stars peeking through gauzy cirrus clouds. (We were fortunate the laser could propagate on this night as cloud conditions were marginal.) This phenomena is not uncommon in the Silicon Valley region. Decades ago, the city of San José installed low pressure sodium street lighting in a 'good neighbor' collaboration with nearby Lick Observatory. Overcast skies often reflect the city's characteristic saffron glow in delicate colors ranging from pink to gold. Filtered through these thin tinted clouds, the moon-brightened blue night appears purple-blue.

    https://mthamilton.ucolick.org/public/lighting/Pollution2.html

    SUMMARY: ADAPTIVE OPTICS | LASER GUIDE STAR

    Many celestial images are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that pass through as they arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 10-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding precise celestial images that rival those from space telescopes.

    SCALE

    Diameter of laser beam: 25 centimeters (~ 9.8 inches)
    Diameter of top ring of telescope: 3.6 meters (~ 11.8 feet)
    Width of dome opening ("slit"): 6.7 meters (~ 22 feet)

    NOTES

    The slit width is uniform throughout. In this photograph, the apparent spread in diameter is a function of camera position, perspective, and wide angle lens optical distortion. The laser launch tube is positioned on the south side of the telescope, with the slit and telescope oriented in an easterly direction. When seen in neutral light, the brushed aluminum dome interior is silver in color. However, in this photograph it is tinted by scattered light from the laser system. The far rim of the slit opening as well as part of the dome interior and telescope structure are brightly illuminated by a full moon. The sky was purple that night as it sometimes is, with city lights reflecting golden-pink on high gauzy cirrus and filtering the otherwise bright blue moonlit sky.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to UCSC Astronomers Claire Max, Srikar Srinath and Lauren Schatz (who graciously traded science time for the photo session), as well as University of California Observatories astronomers, technicians, staff, and friends. Special thanks go to Dr. Elinor Gates and the Mount Hamilton technical support staff for their generous assistance and invaluable collaboration in producing this photograph.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24 mm f/2.8
    15 and 30 seconds @ f/4, 14.0 mm
    ISO digital equivalent: 800
    Native Resolution: 6983x5304 pixels
    Three-frame High Dynamic Range and Panoramic Composite
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    SHOOTING NOTES

    Extreme exposure values between Dr. Max in the foreground and the dark background dome necessitated producing the laser portrait as a stacked composite of three exposures. All frames were shot within moments of each other from the same tripod position, with the same lens and lighting. Two successive frames of the telescope and dome background were exposed for 30 seconds each with flash. One view was lower, the other higher. These frames were stitched together in post production to extend the composition vertically to allow for vertical cropping, as well as horizontal. The subject frame was exposed for 15 seconds with the same flash value, lens, and camera position. It was then layered onto the stitched background frame in post production. The stacked composite is an accurate rendering of what I experienced in the dome that night.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    UCO / Lick Adaptive Optics

    ShARCS Instrument

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to UCSC Astronomers Claire Max, Shrinar Srinath, and Lauren Schatz, as well as University of California Observatories astronomers, technicians, staff, and friends. Special thanks go to Staff Astronomer Dr. Elinor Gates and the Mount Hamilton technical support staff for their generous assistance and invaluable collaboration in producing this photograph.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolutiont.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH7310_Claire Max 3m Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star
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    SANTA CRUZ
    CALIFORNIA

    2005 December 3

    Dr. Jerry Nelson constructs a model of his next telescope.

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII
    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawai‘i, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wakea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawai‘i.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 17-35 mm f/2.8 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 200  /  f/22
    Exposure: 1/45 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.

    The photographer thanks Dr. Nelson and UCO / Lick Observatory staff for their support of this documentary endeavor.


    LINKS:

    University of California Observatories ~ UCO

    Lick Observatory ~ Mount Hamilton

    ____________________________________________________________________________

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

     

    LH0991_Jerry Nelson
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7351_LICK NIROSETI FIRST LIGHT TEAM 

     

    2016 June 16

    From left to right at the 1 meter Nickel Reflector: Friends of NIROSETI Gary Jaffe, Bill Bloomfield, and Susan Bloomfield. To the right of the NIROSETI instrument are team members Shelley Wright, Jérome Maire, Frank Drake, and Remington Stone. Also on the team but not shown are Dan Wertheimer, Richard Treffers, and Andrew Siemion. The NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) is designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths..

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24 mm f/2.8
    Multi frame High Dynamic Range Stacked Composite:
    1/50 second @ f/8
    dual flash used on all exposures, plus interior lighting
    ISO digital equivalent: 640
    Native Resolution: 4426x6759 pixels
    Wide angle lens distortion corrections were manually applied.
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7361_LO-NIROSETI_Team And Friends
    683,960
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7301_FRANK DRAKE NICKEL OSETI 

     

    2011 July 28

    Astronomer Frank Drake arrives for a night of observing with his collaborators at the Nickel 40" Reflector at Lick Observatory. Protruding from the bottom of the telescope is a rectangular instrument designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This instrument was replaced in March 2015 by the NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence), which was designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x, Nikkor 12-24mm f/4.0 wide angle zoomlens
    Digital ISO equivalent: 200 / f/4.0
    Exposure: .5 second
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7301_Frank Drake Nickel OSETI
    1024,732
    Price On Request
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7351_LICK NIROSETI WRIGHT DICHROIC 

     

    NIROSETI: NEAR INFRARED OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2015 March 14

    At the Nickel 1 meter telescope, astronomer Shelley Wright discusses the dichroic filter with her colleague Jérome Maire (only his hand is visible). Her right hand is holding a fiber that emits infrared light for calibration of the detectors. The NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) is designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, and the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    Other team members include Patrick Dorval, Frank Drake, Geoffrey Marcy, Andrew Siemion, Remington Stone, Richard Treffers, and Dan Wertheimer.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 35 mm f/2.8
    Exposure: 1/45 second f/5.6
    Camera mount bounce flash, plus interior lighting
    ISO digital equivalent: 9000
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7351_Lick NIROSETI Wright Dichroic
    1024,683
    Price On Request
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7351_LICK NIROSETI FIRST LIGHT TEAM 

     

    NIROSETI:  NEAR INFRARED OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2015 March 12

    From left to right at the 1 meter Nickel Reflector: Remington Stone, Dan Wertheimer, NIROSETI instrument, Jérome Maire, Shelley Wright, Patrick Dorval, and Richard Treffers. Also on the team but not shown here are Frank Drake, Geoffrey Marcy, and Andrew Siemion. The NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) is designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24 mm f/2.8
    Four frame High Dynamic Range Stacked Composite:
    1/45 second @ f/4.8, ISO 1600
    2 seconds @ f/9.5, ISO 140
    15 seconds @ f/9.5, ISO 140
    14.0 mm all exposures
    dual flash used on all exposures, plus interior lighting
    ISO digital equivalent: 1600 and 140
    Native Resolution: 4426x6759 pixels
    Wide angle lens distortion corrections were manually applied.
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7350_Lick NIROSETI_First Light Team
    629,960
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    2009 May 29

    AUTOMATED PLANET FINDER TELESCOPE

    Principle Investigator Steve Vogt stands near the 2.4-meter primary mirror in the dome of the Automated Planet Finder Telescope at Lick Observatory. APF is fully robotic and equipped with a high-resolution spectrograph (designed by Vogt) optimized for precision Doppler measurements, and will enable off-site astronomers to detect rocky planets of Earth-size masses within our local galactic neighborhood.    

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 10.5 mm f/2.8 fisheye lens
    ISO digital: 125  /  f/3.5
    Exposure: 1/30 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.

    The photographer thanks Dr. Vogt and UCO/Lick staff for their invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.


    LINKS:


    University of California Observatories ~ UCO

    Lick Observatory ~ Mount Hamilton

    ____________________________________________________________________________

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry
    LH2152_APF_Steve Vogt
    1024,688
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7312_LAUREN WEISS UCB APF OBSERVING

     

    2015 January 3


    From the Berkeley remote workstation (about 70 miles away from Lick Observatory on Mt. Hamilton), astronomer Lauren Weiss monitors the Automated Planet Finder (APF), a fully automated telescope that is searching for planets around the nearest stars. On her laptop, Lauren examines some preliminary data revealing planet discoveries while the APF runs. From right to left, the four workstation monitors show (1) the latest webcam view of the APF at Lick Observatory, (2) the guider image as the telescope moves from one star to the next, (3) the latest image of a spectrum from the telescope, in which is hidden the signatures of stellar motion indicative of planets, and (4) another view of the latest spectrum, along with the spectrograph controls.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24 mm f/2.8
    1/30 second @ f/6.5, 14.0 mm
    ISO digital equivalent: 1100
    Native Resolution: 4222x3405 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, corrected for lens distortion, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to UCB astronomer Lauren Weiss for her patience and good humor. We had fun on this photo shoot! 



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH7312_Lauren Weiss UCB Observing APF
    1191,711
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    2006 August 19

    DR. LAUGHLIN WRITES:

    HOT JUPITER:

    This image shows the simulated flow patterns on a massive short-period planet. The color scale has been chosen so as to mimic what the human eye might actually see. The simulations were done by James Cho, image processing by Greg Laughlin. 


    SYSTEMIC CONSOLE:

    The systemic console (written by Aaron Wolf) is a java-based suite of programs that allow astronomers to determine what kind of planetary system is represented by a radial velocity data set. It is available for free download at www.oklo.org.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 125  /  f/7.1
    Exposure: 1/40 second

    This image has been digitally composited using three separate photographic and computer-generated elements, see description above.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.

    The photographer thanks Dr. Laughlin for his significant contributions to this documentary endeavor.


    LINKS:

    University of California Observatories ~ UCO

    Lick Observatory ~ Mount Hamilton

    ____________________________________________________________________________

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry 
    LH2145_Greg Composite
    1024,580
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    2007 June 15

    AUTOMATED PLANET FINDER TELESCOPE

    UCO/Lick Chief Optician Dave Hilyard inspects and cleans optics which are used in the APF Spectrograph. 

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/3.7
    Exposure: 2 seconds

    Multi-frame digital composite

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.

    The photographer thanks APF and UCO/Lick staff for their invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.


    LINKS:

    University of California Observatories ~ UCO

    Lick Observatory ~ Mount Hamilton

    ____________________________________________________________________________

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

    LH2147_Dave Hilyard Colores_APF Optics
    1024,768
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

     

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    2006 July 15

    PLANET HUNTER

    DR. DEBRA FISCHER WRITES:

    "This spectrum shows dark absorption lines which appear because atoms in the atmosphere of the star absorb specific wavelengths of starlight. The presence of these lines reveals the chemical makeup of the star. By measuring subpixel shifts in the positions of these lines with respect to the grid of iodine lines, astronomers can measure the velocity of a star with a precision of one meter per second (or about two miles per hour)." 

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 17-35 mm f/2.8 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/6.3
    Exposure: 1 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    LINKS:

    Exoplanets / Yale Astronomy

    University of California Observatories ~ UCO

    Lick Observatory ~ Mount Hamilton

    ____________________________________________________________________________

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH2137_Debra Fischer Cell Spectrum
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    1999

    PLANET HUNTER

    Astronomer Dr. Paul Butler in the control room of the Shane 3m Telescope at Lick Observatory.        

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon N90x
    Exposure: unrecorded

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.

    The photographer thanks Dr. Butler and UCO/Lick staff for their invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.

     


    LINKS:


    University of California Observatories ~ UCO

    Lick Observatory ~ Mount Hamilton

    ____________________________________________________________________________

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

     

    LH2138_Paul Butler 3m Portrait
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    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 January 22

    OBSERVING PROGRAM:

    Dr. Filippenko writes:

    "UC Berkeley Professor of Astronomy Alex Filippenko (right) and his graduate student Ryan Foley
    (left) examine optical spectra of exploding stars (supernovae) obtained with the DEIMOS
    spectrograph on the Keck II telescope. Although the observers are located in the Keck II Control
    Room in Kamuela, they can see and converse with a telescope operator on the summit of Mauna
    Kea. They are especially interested in Type Ia supernovae, whose observed brightness as a
    function of redshift has been used to determine that the expansion of the Universe is currently
    accelerating, propelled by a mysterious "dark energy" that stretches the very fabric of space."

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAI`I

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 10.5 DX f/2.8 fisheye lens
    ISO digital: 125  /  f/5
    Exposure: 1/30 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    The photographer thanks the astronomers and Keck staff for their invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. 


    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0615_Alex Filippenko Observing
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    2006 September 12

    Dr. Elinor Gates is a staff astronomer at Lick Observatory specializing in laser guide star adaptive optics and near infrared camera instrumentation and observations. She received her Ph.D. in Physics/Astronomy from the University of New Mexico in 1998. Her current research interests are studying quasars and their host galaxies.  She is shown in this image in the dome of the Shane 3-meter Telescope at Lick Observatory.

    ADAPTIVE OPTICS / LASER GUIDE STAR

    Many celestial images are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary new technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 12-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding substantially better data than would otherwise be possible. 

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 12-24 mm f/4.0 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 125  /  f/5.0
    Exposure: 60 secondS

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.

    The photographer thanks Dr. Gates and UCO / Lick Observatory staff for their continual and enthusiastic support.

     


    LINKS:

    University of California Observatories ~ UCO

    Lick Observatory ~ Mount Hamilton

    ____________________________________________________________________________

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    

     

     

     

    EGates_Shane3m_LGS
    795,960
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7306 REFRACTOR TWILIGHT OBSERVING 

     

    2014 April 19


    As darkness approaches, Dr. Alex Filippenko's UC Berkeley Astronomy students begin observations at the Great Lick 36" Refractor.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D800E
    Nikkor 14-24 mm f/2.8
    1/15 second @ f/7.1
    ISO digital equivalent: 6400
    Native Resolution: 7360x5220 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Dr. Alex Fillipenko and his UC Berkeley students, resident astronomer Dr. Elinor Gates, and University of California Observatories / Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. 



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH7306_Refractor Twilight Observing
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7303 GREAT REFRACTOR OBSERVING 

     

    2014 April 19


    Dr. Elinor Gates moves the Great Lick Refractor into the next viewing position, while students from Alex Filippenko's UC Berkeley Astronomy classes await their turn at the eyepiece.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D800E
    Nikkor 14-24 mm f/2.8
    1/15 second @ f/2.8
    ISO digital equivalent: 1600
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Panoramic Composite
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Dr. Alex Fillipenko and his UC Berkeley students, resident astronomer Dr. Elinor Gates, and University of California Observatories / Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. 



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH7303_Great Refractor Observing
    1080,721
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7299 36" LENS CLEANING 

     

    2009 October 9


    Technicians Bob Owen (left) and Darrell Severinsen (right) carefully clean the interior surfaces of the two 36" lenses in the Great Lick Refractor.

    In 2006, UCO Lick Principal Optician David Hilyard described the 1986-1987 refiguring of the lenses:

    "On the 36" refractor; I started work on it in late 1986 and finished in 1988. I worked on this off and on during that time, with most of the work done in 1987. To start, I had made a spherical test plate to match the radius of the outer surface of the crown lens. This gave me a reference in radius and figure to work from. I first qualified the radius and figure using this 12.5" diameter test plate and found the figure irregular. The problem was that the outer region of that surface had trefoil of many waves, probably due to the support used to hold the lens during grinding and re-polishing in the early 1980's before I got here. It seemed easy enough to refigure that surface to a smooth spherical figure while maintaining the radius of curvature. My notes show that it only took 15 hours of careful polishing to restore that surface to 1/10 wave spherical, all the way to the edge. But the test of the objective in auto-collimation against a 40" flat showed spherical aberration of about 2 waves (single-pass). We didn't expect an asphere in the system, but had read that the Clarks sometimes did polish in an asphere to correct for glass inhomogeneities or lens spacing inaccuracies. It took some time to decide whether to figure that surface to an asphere to correct the test, or to do the work on another surface. After starting correction on that same surface, I think it took about 6 months before we decided it was as good as it could be and needed confirmation in the telescope. (Each polishing run, mostly corrected by hand, walking around the lens just like the Clark's did, was followed by re-assembling the objective in the cell and testing at the focus (is it 60 feet?) against the 40" flat, waiting for the glass to equilibrate and the floor to stop vibrating enough to get stable fringes.) Arnold Klemola, the most familiar with the quality of the image from the Clark's work, did the on-the-sky test in 1988. He deemed it as good or better than the original Clark lens."

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18 mm f/2.8 Fisheye
    ISO Equivalent: 125 / f/2.8
    Exposure: 1/4 second

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data — US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH7299_36" Lens Cleaning
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    2003 December 8

    Long-time Mt. Hamilton resident and Research Astronomer Remington Stone visits the 36" Crossley Reflector, where he has spent many nights observing. This historic telescope came to the observatory in 1895 from England.  It was heavily used and highly productive for well over half a century.  Its great utility was instrumental in convincing research astronomers of the advantages for most purposes of using reflecting telescopes.

    See "Sky and Telescope" magazine, October and November 1979 issues, for an in-depth historical review written by Stone.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D100
    Sigma 15 mm f/2.8 semi-fisheye lens
    ISO digital: 200  /  f/7.1
    Exposure: unrecorded

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.

    The photographer thanks UCO/Lick Observatory for its support of this documentary endeavor.


    LINKS:

    University of California Observatories ~ UCO

    Lick Observatory ~ Mount Hamilton

    ____________________________________________________________________________

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

     

    LH0125_Rem Crossley
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    2001 August

    KATZMAN AUTOMATIC IMAGING TELESCOPE

    Astronomer-Engineer Richard Treffers stands with the Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope. Dr. Treffers spent many months on Mt. Hamilton installing and fine-tuning the telescope and its associated systems. Painted in the bold blue and gold of its sponsoring institution UC Berkeley, KAIT is the world’s most successful detector of supernova explosions in nearby galaxies. It averages about 7 discoveries per month. It has also observed comets and the early afterglow of elusive gamma ray bursts. With a mirror 76 centimeters in diameter, this modest but highly efficient reflector is fully robotic, operated remotely from Berkeley by astronomers and student researchers. As evening approaches, automatic sensors outside KAIT’s dome determine wind and humidity levels, and open the dome slit if conditions are favorable. KAIT begins a programmed scan of the heavens, and identifies supernova candidates that the astronomers subsequently examine more closely. These data have contributed to the unexpected discovery that the expansion of our universe is currently accelerating, propelled by a mysterious “dark energy.”

    The dome of the Lick 36" Refractor in the Main Building is seen in the distance at right.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Unrecorded

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.

    The photographer thanks Dr. Treffers, the KAIT team, and UCO/Lick Observatory for its support of this documentary endeavor.


    LINKS:

    University of California Observatories ~ UCO

    Lick Observatory ~ Mount Hamilton

    ____________________________________________________________________________

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

     

    LH0064_KAIT-Treffers
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    2008 May 2


    Lick Observatory's former Director Mike Bolte stands next to the Automated Planet Finder dome.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 125  /  f/10
    Exposure: 1/800 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.

    The photographer sincerely thanks Dr. Bolte for his extraordinary support of her photographic endeavors.


    LINKS:

    University of California Observatories ~ UCO

    Lick Observatory ~ Mount Hamilton

    ____________________________________________________________________________

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

     

    LH2190_Mike Bolte APF
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    UCO LICK OBSERVATORY
    SANTA CRUZ
    CALIFORNIA


     LH2170_APF SPECTROGRAPH HOLIDAY 

     

    2006 December 15


    The APF Spectrograph structure is bedecked with holiday cheer. Astronomer and instrument designer Steve Vogt is left, UCO software visionary-wizard Bob Kibrick right. Under construction in this 2006 image, this high-resolution spectrograph is optimized for precision Doppler measurements. The fully robotic 2.4 meter APF enables off-site astronomers to detect rocky planets of Earth-size masses within our local galactic neighborhoods.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 125 / f/6.3
    Exposure: 1/5 second

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    More Snow Photographs by Lick Staff

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data ? US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • ? here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.?

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    ?FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH2170_APF Spectrograph Holiday
    1024,655
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH0020_REM 'n TELLY 

     

    2001 April


    Research Astronomer and long-time Mt. Hamilton resident Remington Stone cleans the Right Ascension counterweight arm of the Great Lick Refractor. Considered to be an irreplaceable national astronomical treasure, the Lick 36” Refractor saw first light in 1888. At that time it was the most powerful telescope on earth. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. For over a century many significant discoveries were made, such as that of the fifth moon of Jupiter in 1892. In late summer of 2003, and again in fall of 2005, the close approach of Mars was studied and recorded. This impressive instrument is frequently used for public viewing and educational programs.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon N90s
    Exposure: unrecorded

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data — US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote


    LH0020_Rem 'n Telly
    651,960
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH0101_FULL MOON OBSERVING

     

    2003 September 10

    Considered to be an irreplaceable national astronomical treasure, the Lick 36” Refractor saw first light in 1888. At that time it was the most powerful telescope on earth. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. For over a century many significant discoveries were made, such as that of the fifth moon of Jupiter in 1892. In late summer of 2003, and again in fall of 2005, the close approach of Mars was studied and recorded. In this photograph Mars observers William Sheehan and Tony Misch are taking a break from observing the red planet and instead are viewing the full moon.

    The Great Refractor and dome interior are seen through the encompassing eye of a 180-degree fisheye lens. It is challenging to capture the unique ambience inside this enormous Victorian structure. Perhaps the experience is described most eloquently by early Lick Director and accomplished astronomer James Keeler in a fascinating article written for the 1888 July 6 issue of The Engineer: “Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the great telescope.” Both dome and telescope were technological marvels in their day, and have seen many seminal discoveries. Occasionally used in its second century for research, this venerable telescope frequently inspires visiting classes and summer visitors with enchanting views of the heavens. 

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon N90s, Sigma 15mm f/2.8 semi-fisheye lens
    Provia 400 Color Reversal film
    Exposure: unrecorded, two composited frames, one shot for highlights, the other for midtones and shadows

    A digital perspective correction filter was subsequently applied to the image file to restore fisheye distortion to a rectillinear view.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Two Weeks On Mars

    Support Lick Observatory

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    Lick Observatory Telescopes

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    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Lick Observatory Summer Series

     

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to William Sheehan, Tony Misch, and University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this image.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

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    LH0101_Full Moon Observing
    637,960
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7353_LICK NIROSETI FIRST LIGHT NIGHT 

     

    NIROSETI: NEAR INFRARED OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2015 March 15

    The NIROSETI (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) instrument saw first light on the Nickel 1-meter Telescope shortly before this photograph was made. The Nickel is housed inside the Main Building's near foreground dome. NIROSETI team members are counting their 'lucky stars' that clouds did not prevent star light from reaching the instrument. Enjoying a celebratory walk under the night sky, astronomer Shelley Wright pauses in view of the camera. Wright's image is ghosted because she was stationary for only a brief moment during the camera's longer time exposure. Inside the dome, Jérome Maire, Patrick Dorval, and Remington Stone continue to test the instrument, albeit through changing clouds. Other team members include Frank Drake, Geoffrey Marcy, Andrew Siemion, Richard Treffers, and Dan Wertheimer. The NIROSETI instrument is designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    Saffron colored low pressure sodium street lamps in nearby San José tint the clouds a soft orange-pink.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24 mm f/2.8
    Exposure: 30 seconds f/2.8
    ISO digital equivalent: 400
    Native Resolution: 7323x6313 pixels
    Two-frame Composited Panorama
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



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    LH7353_Lick NIROSETI First Light Night
    800,689
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7352_LICK NIROSETI COMPUTER ROOM 

     

    NIROSETI: NEAR INFRARED OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2015 March 14

    In the Nickel 1 meter telescope control room, astronomers Shelley Wright (lower right), Patrick Dorval (left) and Jérome Maire (center) are shown with computers and other electronic components of the NIROSETI (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) instrument. Coupled with the detector mounted on the telescope a few meters from the control room, this instrument is designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative system is the only one of its kind in the world, the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    Other team members include Frank Drake, Geoffrey Marcy, Andrew Siemion, Remington Stone, Richard Treffers, and Dan Wertheimer.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 35 mm f/2.8
    Exposure: 1/30 second f/10
    Camera mount bounce flash, plus interior lighting
    ISO digital equivalent: 2200
    Native Resolution: 4912x7360 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



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    LH7352_Lick NIROSETI Computer Room
    673,960
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7300_NICKEL OSETI 

     

    OSETI: OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2011 July 28

    Astronomer Shelley Wright, Frank Drake, and Remington Stone have arrived for a night of observing at the Nickel 40" Reflector at Lick Observatory. Protruding from the bottom of the telescope is a rectangular instrument designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This instrument was replaced in March 2015 by the NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence), which was designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 12-24 mm f/4.0 wide angle zoom lens
    ISO digital: 200 / f/4.0
    Exposure: 1/13 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

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    LH7300_Nickel OSETI
    666,960
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7311_CLAIRE MAX_OBSERVERS 3M CONTROL ROOM 

     

    2015 January 6

    Read about PHOTOGRAPHING THE LASER


    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS / LASER GUIDE STAR • AO/LGS •ShARCS

    This photograph was made at Lick Observatory on 2015 January 6 at 1:15 AM. University of California Observatories Interim Director Claire Max (left) is discussing the night's program with fellow astronomers Lauren Schatz (middle) and Srikar Srinath (right). They are using the Shane Adaptive Optics Laser Guide Star system on the telescope. Shrikar says, "We were working on Schatz' senior thesis, and observing star clusters (NGC 2419 among them) to help characterize how well the new Shane AO adaptive optics system on the Shane telescope is doing." This is the first of a two night observing run, and they've already had a long day, preparing for the run and traveling to Mt. Hamilton. If all goes well with the weather and equipment, they have many more hours ahead of them on this long winter's night. The reward is acquiring critical data for their research, and to test the new system.


    SUMMARY: ADAPTIVE OPTICS | LASER GUIDE STAR

    Many celestial images are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that pass through as they arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 10-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding precise celestial images that rival those from space telescopes.

    NOTES

    Sincere gratitude is extended to UCSC Astronomers Dr. Claire Max, Shrikar Srinath, and Lauren Statz, as well as University of California Observatories astronomers, technicians, staff, and friends. Special thanks go to Dr. Elinor Gates and the Mount Hamilton technical support staff for their generous assistance and invaluable collaboration in producing Lick Observatory photographs.


    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24 mm f/2.8
    1/30 second @ f/4, 19.0 mm
    ISO digital equivalent: 3200
    Native Resolution: 5130x3326 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, corrected for lens distortion, and sharpened for digital output

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    UCO / Lick Adaptive Optics

    ShARCS Instrument

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to UCSC Astronomers Claire Max, Shrinar Srinath, and Lauren Schatz, as well as University of California Observatories astronomers, technicians, staff, and friends. Special thanks go to Staff Astronomer Dr. Elinor Gates and the Mount Hamilton technical support staff for their generous assistance and invaluable collaboration in producing Lick Observatory photographs.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolutiont.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH7311_Claire Max Observers 3m Control Room
    1280,830
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7302_OSETI PI SHELLEY WRIGHT 

     

    OSETI: OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2011 July 28

    Principal Investigator Shelley Wright observes in the control room of the Anna B. Nickel 40" Reflector. Mounted on the telescope is an instrument designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This instrument was replaced in March 2015 by the NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence), which was designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 12-24 mm f/4.0 wide angle zoom lens
    ISO digital: 200 / f/4.0
    Exposure: 1/13 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



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    LH7302_OSETI PI Shelley Wright
    1024,623
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     OSETI VIDEO CONFERENCE 

     

    OSETI: OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2011 July 28

    Astronomer and Lick OSETI Principal Investigator Shelley Wright is flanked by collaborators Remington Stone (left) and Frank Drake (right). They are in the control room of the Nickel 40" Reflector, and in the midst of a video conference with Geoffrey Marcy at UC Berkeley. (Note that Dr. Drake has arrived with provisions for the night's observing: a bag of home-baked chocolate chip cookies, and almost enough m&m's for everyone.) Mounted on the telescope is an instrument designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This instrument was replaced in March 2015 by the NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence), which was designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress (shown in the framed photograph on the desk) whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x

    Nikkor 12-24mm f/4.0 wide angle zoomlens
    Digital ISO equivalent: 200 / f/4.0
    Exposure: 1/13 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



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    OSETI Nickel Control Room VidCon
    1024,488
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     REM OSETI NICKEL REFLECTOR 

     

    OSETI: OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2011 July 28

    University of California Research Astronomer Remington Stone lived and worked at Lick Observatory on Mt. Hamilton for 42 years. Here he is shown on the roof of the Main Building, with the Nickel 1-m Reflector in the background. Mounted on the telescope is an instrument designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This instrument was replaced in March 2015 by the NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence), which was designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Unrecorded

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



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    Rem_OSETI_Nickel Reflector
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    2006 July 15

    PLANET HUNTER

    WHEN THIS PHOTO WAS MADE IN 2006, DR. DEBRA FISCHER WROTE:

    "Debra Fischer is a professor of astronomy at San Francisco State University. Since 1997, she has been detecting extrasolar planets and has participated in the discovery of more than 100 worlds orbiting nearby stars. She is the author of more than 100 refereed professional publicatiions, including a landmark paper showing the correlation between the chemical composition of stars and the formation of planets. Dr. Fischer is now working on a robotic telescope that will be commissioned at Lick Observatory in 2007 to detect earthlike planets capable of hosting organic life."

    2014 UPDATE:  Dr. Fischer is now a Professor of Astronomy at Yale.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 24-120mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100 / f/8
    Exposure: 1/40 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    LINKS:

    Exoplanets / Yale Astronomy

    University of California Observatories ~ UCO

    Lick Observatory ~ Mount Hamilton

    ____________________________________________________________________________

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH2135_Debra Fischer Portrait
    1024,680
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  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

     

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    2006 July 15

    PLANET HUNTER

    DR. DEBRA FISCHER WRITES:

    "This spectrum shows dark absorption lines which appear because atoms in the atmosphere of the star absorb specific wavelengths of starlight. The presence of these lines reveals the chemical makeup of the star. By measuring subpixel shifts in the positions of these lines with respect to the grid of iodine lines, astronomers can measure the velocity of a star with a precision of one meter per second (or about two miles per hour)." 

    The Solar Spectrum appears courtesy of National Optical Astronomy Observatory/Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy/National Science Foundation. 

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 17-35 mm f/2.8 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/6.3
    Exposure: 1 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    LINKS:

    Exoplanets / Yale Astronomy

    University of California Observatories ~ UCO

    Lick Observatory ~ Mount Hamilton

    ____________________________________________________________________________

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH2136_Debra Stellar Spectrum
    1024,680
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH2139_Geoffrey Marcy 

     

    PLANET HUNTER

    200f July 15

    Astronomer Dr. Geoffrey Marcy at Lick Observatory.

     A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 24-120 mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 400 / f/5.6

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Dr. Marcy, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



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    LH2139_Geoffrey Marcy
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7305_CONNIE-RENATE_ShaneAO 

     

    2014 April 12

    Read about PHOTOGRAPHING THE LASER


    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS / LASER GUIDE STAR • AO/LGS •ShARCS

    This image was photographed at Lick Observatory inside the Shane 3m control Room. Pictured are UC Santa Cruz Associate Professor of Astronomy Connie Rockosi (http://www.ucolick.org/~crockosi/), left, and UCSC Project Scientist Renate Kupke, right (http://www.astro.ucsc.edu/about_department/people/singleton.php?&singleton=true&cruz_id=rkupke).

    Dr. Kupke contributes the following description:

    "In April, 2014 a powerful new instrument, ShaneAO, was commissioned on the 3-meter telescope at Lick Observatory. ShaneAO, coupled with a new crystal fiber-based laser guide star (to be deployed in early 2015) represents a significant advance in adaptive optics capabilities for Lick Observatory. It utilizes a high-order, high-bandwidth 'wavefront sensor' to measure the distortions caused by the Earth’s atmosphere, and two 'deformable' mirrors to optimally compensate for the distortion. The system produces sharp, clear images that rival those of a space-based telescope, at shorter wavelengths than previously possible."

    SUMMARY: ADAPTIVE OPTICS | LASER GUIDE STAR

    Many celestial images are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that pass through as they arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 10-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding precise celestial images that rival those from space telescopes.


    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D800E
    Nikkor 28-300 f/3.5-5.6
    1/60 second @ f/5 24.0 mm
    ISO digital equivalent: 1250
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.
    This is a depth of field composite of two successively shot images at different focus points, to ensure precise focus on both individuals.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    UCO / Lick Adaptive Optics

    ShARCS Instrument

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to UCSC Astronomers Connie Rockosi and Renate Kupke, as well as University of California Observatories astronomers, technicians, staff, and friends. Special thanks go to Staff Astronomer Dr. Elinor Gates and the Mount Hamilton technical support staff for their generous assistance and invaluable collaboration in producing this photograph.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolutiont.

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    LH7305_Rockosi-Kupke_ShaneAO
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    2004 July

    Laser Technician Kostas Chloros inspects the amp table which is mounted on the Shane 3-meter Reflector. Chloros describes the scene: "... The lower 'black' box on the telescope has a few names, 'laser table' is used for presentations etc, we call it the 'amp table' because it contains the amplifiers. Sometimes it is also called the 'dye table.' Inside the laser table is the preamplifier in the bottom where most of the yellow light can be seen, and in the center is the amplifier, where it is mostly green."

    ADAPTIVE OPTICS / LASER GUIDE STAR:

    Many celestial images are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary new technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 12-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding substantially better data than would otherwise be possible.   

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D100
    Nikkor 15 mm f/2.8 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 200  /  f/2.8
    Exposure: 1/25 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.

    The photographer thanks Kostas and UCO/Lick Observatory for their support of this documentary endeavor.


    LINKS:

    University of California Observatories ~ UCO

    Lick Observatory ~ Mount Hamilton

    ____________________________________________________________________________

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    email comment / inquiry

     

     

     

    LH0131_Amp Table Kostas
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    2003 September

    MARS OPPOSITION 2003

    Tony Misch and Bill Sheehan at the operator's console of the 36". The desk is littered with drawings -- some new, some old. The open book in the foreground is one of E. E. Barnard's observing books from the 1894 opposition.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Unrecorded

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.

    The photographer thanks Tony and Bill, and UCO/Lick Observatory staff for their support of this documentary endeavor.


    LINKS:

    Two Weeks On Mars

    University of California Observatories ~ UCO

    Lick Observatory ~ Mount Hamilton

    ____________________________________________________________________________

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    LH2003_Tony Misch_Bill Sheehan_Mars Drawings
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    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 January 22

    OBSERVING PROGRAM:

    Astronomer Paul Butler discusses his planet search program in the Keck I Control Room at Keck Headquarters in Kamuela. The monitor on a shelf at upper left shows the Keck I Observing Assistant in a live video feed from the control room on the Mauna Kea summit. She has a monitor that is simultaneously showing Paul in Kamuela.

    Paul's observing colleague Steven Vogt has stepped out of the room.

    Steve in K I Control Room

    Steve and Paul in K I Control Room

     

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 mm  DX f/3.5-5.6 zoom
    ISO digital: 125 /  f/6.3
    Exposure:  1/30 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    The photographer thanks the astronomers and Keck staff for their invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. 


    LICENSING

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    LH0651 Paul Butler Observing
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    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 January 22

    OBSERVING PROGRAM:

    Astronomers Paul Butler (left) and Steven Vogt (right) search for evidence of extrasolar planets on an array of monitors in the Keck I Control Room in Kamuela.

    Steve in K I Control Room

    Paul in K I Control Room

     

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 10.5mm  DX f/2.8 fisheye
    ISO digital: 125  /  f/6.3
    Exposure:  1/30 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    The photographer thanks the astronomers and Keck staff for their invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. 


    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0653 Butler and Vogt Observing
    1024,825
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    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 January 22

    OBSERVING PROGRAM:

    Astronomer Steven Vogt is searching for planets in the Keck I Control Room at Keck Headquarters in Kamuela. His observing colleague Paul Butler has stepped out of the room.

    Paul in K I Control Room

    Steve and Paul in K I Control Room

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 mm  DX f/3.5-5.6 zoom
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/6.3
    Exposure:  1/30 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    The photographer thanks the astronomers and Keck staff for their invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. 


    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

    LH0652 Steve Vogt Observing
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    UCO-LICK OBSERVATORY
    SANTA CRUZ
    CALIFORNIA


     LH0190_JOE MILLER_OSTERBROCK SYMPOSIUM  

     

    2004 July 30


    Former Lick Observatory Director Joseph S. Miller is at the podium during the OsterbrockSymposium in July 2004. While serving the UC system as Director of UCO/Lick Observatory (1991-2005), Miller oversaw completion of the highly successful twin Keck Telescopes in Hawai‘i, followed later by launching of the Thirty Meter Telescope project. In addition to his own work as talented designer of sophisticated and enormously productive astronomical instruments, his many years of leadership of the Lick Instrumentation Laboratory cemented its reputation as the world's best source for reliable and useful forefront astronomical instruments. Miller was one of the founders of the NSF Center for Adaptive Optics, headquartered on the UCSC campus. Miller and R.R. Antonucci originated what has become the "standard model" explaining the many curious manifestations of active galactic nuclei.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D100
    Nikkor 80-200 mm f/32.8 zoom lens @ f/3.5
    ISO Equivalent: 1000
    Exposure: 1/50 second

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    More Snow Photographs by Lick Staff

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data ? US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • ? here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.?

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

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    LH0190_Joe Miller_Osterbrock Symposium
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH0058p JOSEPH MILLER SHANE 3M KAST SPECTROGRAPH 

     

    2003


    Former University of California Observatories Director Joseph Miller with the Kast Spectrograph on the Lick Observatory 3m Telescope. As Director, Dr. Miller guided the observatory through the formative years of the Keck Telescopes, and launched UC's participation in the Thirty Meter Telescope project.

    The Shane 120" Reflector was the second largest telescope in the world when it was completed in 1959. It bears the name of former Lick Observatory director and astronomer Donald Shane, who spearheaded its development. The mirror was originally a test blank for the Palomar 200" Reflector, then the world’s largest telescope. (Pyrex glass was invented specifically for use in these mirrors.) Although the Shane is modest in size by current standards, state-of-the-art research progresses in several fields, including adaptive optics and laser guide-star programs. The recently upgraded and highly productive William and Marina Kast Spectrograph is attached at the lower end of the telescope.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Unrecorded
    Multi-frame Stitched Panorama

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data ? US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • ? here

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    LH0058p_Joseph Miller Shane 3m Kast Spectrograph
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    UCO-LICK OBSERVATORY
    SANTA CRUZ
    CALIFORNIA


     LH0192_SHEEHAN-OSTERBROCK_TWO SCHOLARS  

     

    2005 October 19


    William Sheehan, left, and Donald Osterbrock, right, are attending a colloquium reception in the Center for Adaptive Optics lobby at the UC Santa Cruz campus.s.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2X
    Nikkor 24-120 mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens @ f/5.6
    ISO Equivalent: 200
    Exposure: 1/40 second

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    More Snow Photographs by Lick Staff

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data ? US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • ? here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.?

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    LH0192_Sheehan-Osterbrock_Two Scholars
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH2131 KEITH and CHRIS 3M CONTROL ROOM  

     

    2006 August 10


    Technician Keith Baker adusts telescope coordinates in the control room of the Shane 3-meter Telescope, while Astronomer Chris McCarthy looks on.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 12-24 mm f/4.0 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 125 / f/8
    Exposure: 1/4 second

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    More Snow Photographs by Lick Staff

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data ? US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • ? here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.?

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    LH2131_Keith and Chris 3m Control Room
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH0191_MARGARET BURBIDGE - OSTERBROCK SYMPOSIUM  

     

    2004 July 30


    British born University of California astronomer E. Margaret Burbidge is a truly remarkable astrophysicist. This gentle, soft-spoken, extremely talented and capable scientist, in addition to being an outstanding astronomer, did much to make the profession more fully open to women. Early in her long career, she was lead author on an epochal paper which first described the nuclear processes which create elements in the interiors of stars. She has been a very active observer with a broad expertise in spectra of stars and galaxies, and is a pioneer in the early study of then-enigmatic quasars. As founding Director of the Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences at UC San Diego, she was deeply involved with instrumentation for the Hubble Space Telescope.

    She is a Fellow of the Royal Society, served as Director of the Royal Greenwich Observatory, President of the American Astronomical Society, President of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and has been the recipient of many other awards and distinctions.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D100
    Nikkor 80-200 mm f/2.8 zoom lens @ f/3.5
    ISO Equivalent: 800
    Exposure: 1/50 second

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    More Snow Photographs by Lick Staff

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data ? US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • ? here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.?

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

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    LH0191_MargaretBurbidge_OsterbrockSymposium
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    2003 December 19

    Carnegie Double Astrograph veteran observers Burt Jones and Arnold Klemola pay a nostalgic visit an old friend.  Together they have spent thousands of hours mapping the sky with this venerable instrument.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon N90s
    Provia 400 Color Reversal film
    Exposure: unrecorded

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    LINKS:

    University of California Observatories ~ UCO

    Lick Observatory ~ Mount Hamilton

    ____________________________________________________________________________

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    LH0151_Astrograph1
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    2006 July 27

    AUTOMATED PLANET FINDER TELESCOPE

    Planet hunter Geoff Marcy anxiously awaits completion of the 2.4-meter Automatic Planet Finder telescope at Lick Observatory. The anticipated performance of this dedicated and robotic facility may enable discovery of other earth-like planets.  

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 12-24 mm f/4.0 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100 / f/5.6
    Exposure: 1/125 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.

    The photographer thanks Dr. Marcy and UCO/Lick staff for their invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.


    LINKS:


    University of California Observatories ~ UCO

    Lick Observatory ~ Mount Hamilton

    ____________________________________________________________________________

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    LH2113_APF Geoffrey Marcy
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    2009 October 2

    UCSC 2009 GRADUATE STUDENT WORKSHOP

    Participants from the UCSC 2009 Graduate Student Workshop gather in the dome of the Great Lick Refractor for a night of viewing.  Jupiter is visible in the dome slit.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 10-24 mm f/4.0 wide angle zoom lens
    ISO digital: 125  /  f/4.0
    Exposure: 1 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    LINKS:

    University of California Observatories ~ UCO

    Lick Observatory ~ Mount Hamilton

    ____________________________________________________________________________

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

     

    LH7294_GradStudentWorkshop2009
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH0240_SVP-Dorothy Schaumberg  

     

    2005 September 10


    As part of the Lick Observatory Summer Programs, Dorothy Schaumberg is seen speaking at the podium (far side of the group of people) on the beautiful dome floor of the Great Lick Refractor. She is entertaining visitors with the fascinating history of this historic California institution. She enjoyed doing these talks for many years, as a natural extension to her decades of service to the Mary Lea Shane Archives of Lick Observatory, located on the UCSC campus, where she served ultimately as Curator. When her talk is concluded, the chairs will be whisked away, the lights turned off, and visitors will peer through the Great Lick Refractor at the evening's pick of celestial delights.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 12-24 mm f/4.0 wide-angle zoom lens
    ISO Equivalent: 400
    Exposure: 0.4 second @ f/4.0

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    More Snow Photographs by Lick Staff

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data ? US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • ? here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.?

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    LH0240_SVP-Dorothy Schaumberg
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    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 January 28

    OBSERVING PROGRAM:

    Shelley Wright (left) and Michael McElwain (right) are finding a break during a long set of integrations using the Keck Observatory's Adaptive Optics system and the integral field spectrograph OSIRIS. When this photograph was made, both McElwain and Wright were part of the OSIRIS instrument team which helped in the implementation and commissioning of the instrument with Professor James Larkin at UC Los Angeles. Here they are attempting to image close planet companions to bright young stars.

    OSIRIS was designed by Larkin to work specifically with the Keck AO system and to dissect tiny portions of the sky. It can analyze light from over 3000 adjacent regions simultaneously, allowing astronomers to measure the chemical makeup of objects, as well as rotations and more complex motions over an extended area.

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 DX f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/6.3
    Exposure: 1/30 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star

    UCLA ~ OSIRIS Spectrograph 

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    The photographer thanks the astronomers and Keck staff for their invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. 


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    LH0641_Happy Astronomers
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