• view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7354_LICK NIROSETI CLOUDY DUSK FIRST LIGHT NIGHT 

     

    2015 March 14

    The top ring and secondary mirror of the Nickel 1-meter Reflector are visible in the open dome as dusk settles on Mount Hamilton. Mounted on the lower part of the telescope and out of view of the camera, the NIROSETI (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) instrument is designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths. Inside the dome, Principal Investigator Shelley Wright and her team colleagues Jérome Maire, Patrick Dorval, and Remington Stone are making final adjustments on the instrument before turning off the dome lights. They are hoping the clouds will dissipate later in the night as predicted by the weather forecast.

    Approximately seven hours after this photograph was made, first light was seen in the wee hours of the morning, 2015 March 15.

    Other team members include Frank Drake, Geoffrey Marcy, Andrew Siemion, Richard Treffers, and Dan Wertheimer.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 280300 mm f/3.5-5.6
    Exposure: 2 seconds f/5.0
    ISO digital equivalent: 100
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    UC San Diego NIROSETI First Light Press Release

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



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    LH7354_Lick NIROSETI Cloudy Dusk First Light Night
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7353_LICK NIROSETI FIRST LIGHT NIGHT 

     

    2015 March 15

    The NIROSETI (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) instrument saw first light on the Nickel 1-meter Telescope shortly before this photograph was made. The Nickel is housed inside the Main Building's near foreground dome. NIROSETI team members are counting their 'lucky stars' that clouds did not prevent star light from reaching the instrument. Enjoying a celebratory walk under the night sky, astronomer Shelley Wright pauses in view of the camera. Wright's image is ghosted because she was stationary for only a brief moment during the camera's longer time exposure. Inside the dome, Jérome Maire, Patrick Dorval, and Remington Stone continue to test the instrument, albeit through changing clouds. Other team members include Frank Drake, Geoffrey Marcy, Andrew Siemion, Richard Treffers, and Dan Wertheimer. The NIROSETI instrument is designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    Saffron colored low pressure sodium street lamps in nearby San José tint the clouds a soft orange-pink.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24 mm f/2.8
    Exposure: 30 seconds f/2.8
    ISO digital equivalent: 400
    Native Resolution: 7323x6313 pixels
    Two-frame Composited Panorama
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

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    LH7353_Lick NIROSETI First Light Night
    800,689
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  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7351_LICK NIROSETI FIRST LIGHT TEAM

     

    2015 March 12

    From left to right at the 1 meter Nickel Reflector: Remington Stone, Dan Werthimer, NIROSETI instrument, Jérome Maire, Shelley Wright, Patrick Dorval, and Richard Treffers. Also on the team but not shown here are Frank Drake, Geoffrey Marcy, and Andrew Siemion. The NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) is designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24 mm f/2.8
    Four frame High Dynamic Range Stacked Composite:
    1/45 second @ f/4.8, ISO 1600
    2 seconds @ f/9.5, ISO 140
    15 seconds @ f/9.5, ISO 140
    14.0 mm all exposures
    dual flash used on all exposures, plus interior lighting
    ISO digital equivalent: 1600 and 140
    Native Resolution: 4426x6759 pixels
    Wide angle lens distortion corrections were manually applied.
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

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    LH7350_Lick NIROSETI First Light Team
    629,960
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  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7352_LICK NIROSETI COMPUTER ROOM 

     

    2015 March 14

    In the Nickel 1 meter telescope control room, astronomers Shelley Wright (lower right), Patrick Dorval (left) and Jérome Maire (center) are shown with computers and other electronic components of the NIROSETI (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) instrument. Coupled with the detector mounted on the telescope a few meters from the control room, this instrument is designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative system is the only one of its kind in the world, the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    Other team members include Frank Drake, Geoffrey Marcy, Andrew Siemion, Remington Stone, Richard Treffers, and Dan Wertheimer.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 35 mm f/2.8
    Exposure: 1/30 second f/10
    Camera mount bounce flash, plus interior lighting
    ISO digital equivalent: 2200
    Native Resolution: 4912x7360 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

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    LH7352_Lick NIROSETI Computer Room
    673,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7351_LICK NIROSETI WRIGHT DICHROIC 

     

    2015 March 14

    At the Nickel 1 meter telescope, astronomer Shelley Wright discusses the dichroic filter with her colleague Jérome Maire (only his hand is visible). Her right hand is holding a fiber that emits infrared light for calibration of the detectors. The NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) is designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, and the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    Other team members include Patrick Dorval, Frank Drake, Geoffrey Marcy, Andrew Siemion, Remington Stone, Richard Treffers, and Dan Wertheimer.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 35 mm f/2.8
    Exposure: 1/45 second f/5.6
    Camera mount bounce flash, plus interior lighting
    ISO digital equivalent: 9000
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

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    LH7351_Lick NIROSETI Wright Dichroic
    1024,683
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  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7355_LICK NIROSETI TROUBLESHOOTING 

     

    2015 March 14

    At the Nickel 1 meter telescope, astronomer Dan Wertheimer (right) troubleshoots the instrument interface with his colleague Jérome Maire (left). Lick Observatory telescope technician Wayne Earthman (center) is assisting. The NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) is designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, and the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    Other team members include Patrick Dorval, Frank Drake, Geoffrey Marcy, Andrew Siemion, Remington Stone, Richard Treffers, and Shelley Wright.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 35 mm f/2.0
    Exposure: 1/125 second f/4
    Camera mount bounce flash, plus interior lighting
    ISO digital equivalent: 2200
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    NIROSETI First Light UCSD Press Release 

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

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    LH7355_Lick NIROSETI Toubleshooting
    1024,710
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  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7356_LICK NIROSETI RICHARD TREFFERS 

     

    2015 March 14

    At the Nickel 1 meter telescope, astronomer Richard Treffers is working on the new instrument installation. At left, the foreground heat sink for the guide camera is affectionatley known as the "porcupine". (The photographer thinks it's a hedgehog.) Lick Observatory telescope technician Wayne Earthman (center) is assisting. The NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) is designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, and the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths..

    Other team members include Patrick Dorval, Frank Drake, Jérome Maire, Geoffrey Marcy, Andrew Siemion, Remington Stone, Richard Treffers, Dan Wertheimer, and Shelley Wright.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 35 mm f/2.0
    Exposure: 1/3505 second f/4
    Camera mount bounce flash, plus interior lighting
    ISO digital equivalent: 2200
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    NIROSETI First Light UCSD Press Release 

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

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    LH7356_Lick NIROSETI Richard Treffers
    1024,683
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  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7357_LICK NIROSETI INSTRUMENT LAYOUT 

     

    NIROSETI: NEAR INFRARED OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2015 March 14

    Mounted on the Nickel 1 meter telescope,the NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) is designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, and the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    Team members include Patrick Dorval, Frank Drake, Geoffrey Marcy, Andrew Siemion, Remington Stone, Richard Treffers, Dan Wertheimer, and PI Shelley Wright.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 35 mm f/2.0
    Exposure: 1/45 second f/8
    Camera mount bounce flash, plus interior lighting
    ISO digital equivalent: 2000
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Lick Observatory Nickel Telescope

    NIROSETI UCSD First Light Press Release

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.?



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

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    LH7357_Lick NIROSETI Instrument Layout
    1280,960
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  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7358_LICK NIROSETI INSTRUMENT COLORFUL LAYOUT 

     

    NIROSETI: NEAR INFRARED OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2015 March 14

    Mounted on the Nickel 1 meter telescope,the NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) is designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, and the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    Team members include Patrick Dorval, Frank Drake, Geoffrey Marcy, Andrew Siemion, Remington Stone, Richard Treffers, Dan Wertheimer, and PI Shelley Wright.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 35 mm f/2.0
    Exposure: 60 seconds f/8
    ISO digital equivalent: 400
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Lick Observatory Nickel Telescope

    NIROSETI UCSD First Light Press Release

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.?



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7358_Lick NIROSETI Instrument Colorful layout
    1280,960
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  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7360_LICK NIROSETI CONJUNCTION 

     

    NIROSETI: NEAR INFRARED OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2015 March 12

    This early morning view through the dome slit of the Anna B. Nickel 40" Reflector shows a conjunction of three planets framing the telescope top ring: Mars at lower left, Venus (brightest) above and right, and Jupiter above and left of Venus. Red observing lights tint the dome interior. The Nickel is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12" Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger field of view. At right in the foreground, the NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) is attached to the bottom of the round black tub. This innovative device is designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. It is the only one of its kind in the world, and the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Two HDR Frames:
    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 zoom  
    ISO 200
    10 sec @ f/7.1
    5 sec @ f/11
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels

    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output. This is a composited High Definition Range exposure stack of two consecutive frames (one lighter, one darker) shot with the same camera, lens, and tripod position. Because the center areas of imagery recorded with the 14-24mm lens typically tend to be unnaturally compressed and reduced in size, while perimeter areas are elongated and stretched, the central upper ring of the telescope and surrounding sky (including planets) and slit edges were moderately adjusted and expanded with the Photoshop Liquefy command to more correctly represent the overall relative shape of the telescope and slit structure. The planets were then readjusted for roundness. Their relative positions to each other and in the sky have been accurately maintained. A digital diffusion filter technique was applied to the planets to slightly expand and soften their glow, and to fine-tune color grading. All adjustments were made in order to overcome limitations in range of exposure and distorted optics, and to more accurately convey what I viewed in the moment of capture. (www.cloudynights.com/page/articles/cat/articles/astrophotography/diffusion-filter-overlay-with-photoshop-r126).

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



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    LH7360_Nickel-NIROSETI-Conjunction
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7301_FRANK DRAKE NICKEL OSETI 

     

    2011 July 28

    Astronomer Frank Drake arrives for a night of observing with his collaborators at the Nickel 40" Reflector at Lick Observatory. Protruding from the bottom of the telescope is a rectangular instrument designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This instrument was replaced in March 2015 by the NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence), which was designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths..

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x, Nikkor 12-24mm f/4.0 wide angle zoomlens
    Digital ISO equivalent: 200 / f/4.0
    Exposure: .5 second
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output. 

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



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    LH7301_Frank Drake Nickel OSETI
    1024,732
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     OSETI VIDEO CONFERENCE 

     

    OSETI: OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2011 July 28

    Astronomer and Lick OSETI Principal Investigator Shelley Wright is flanked by collaborators Remington Stone (left) and Frank Drake (right). They are in the control room of the Nickel 40" Reflector, and in the midst of a video conference with Geoffrey Marcy at UC Berkeley. (Note that Dr. Drake has arrived with provisions for the night's observing: a bag of home-baked chocolate chip cookies, and almost enough m&m's for everyone.) Mounted on the telescope is an instrument designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This instrument was replaced in March 2015 by the NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence), which was designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress (shown in the framed photograph on the desk) whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x

    Nikkor 12-24mm f/4.0 wide angle zoomlens
    Digital ISO equivalent: 200 / f/4.0
    Exposure: 1/13 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



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    OSETI_Vid Con
    1024,488
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7300_NICKEL OSETI 

     

    OSETI: OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2011 July 28

    Astronomer Shelley Wright, Frank Drake, and Remington Stone have arrived for a night of observing at the Nickel 40" Reflector at Lick Observatory. Protruding from the bottom of the telescope is a rectangular instrument designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This instrument was replaced in March 2015 by the NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence), which was designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 12-24 mm f/4.0 wide angle zoom lens
    ISO digital: 200 / f/4.0
    Exposure: 1/13 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



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    LH7300_NickelOSETI
    666,960
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7302_OSETI PI SHELLEY WRIGHT 

     

    OSETI: OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2011 July 28

    Principal Investigator Shelley Wright observes in the control room of the Anna B. Nickel 40" Reflector. Mounted on the telescope is an instrument designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This instrument was replaced in March 2015 by the NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence), which was designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 12-24 mm f/4.0 wide angle zoom lens
    ISO digital: 200 / f/4.0
    Exposure: 1/13 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



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    LH7302_OSEITI_Wright_ControlRm
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH2139_Geoffrey Marcy 

     

    PLANET HUNTER

    200f July 15

    Astronomer Dr. Geoffrey Marcy at Lick Observatory.

     A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 24-120 mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 400 / f/5.6

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Dr. Marcy, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



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    LH2139_Geoffrey Marcy
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     REM OSETI NICKEL REFLECTOR 

     

    OSETI: OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2011 July 28

    University of California Research Astronomer Remington Stone lived and worked at Lick Observatory on Mt. Hamilton for 42 years. Here he is shown on the roof of the Main Building, with the Nickel 1-m Reflector in the background. Mounted on the telescope is an instrument designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This instrument was replaced in March 2015 by the NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence), which was designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Unrecorded

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



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    Rem_OSETI_Nickel Reflector
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
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     LH0007_NICKEL OSETI 

     

    OSETI: OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2002

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture. Protruding from the bottom of the telescope is a rectangular instrument designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This instrument was replaced in March 2015 by the NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence), which was designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon N90s, Nikkor 22mm f/2.8 lens
    Fuji Supra 100 Color Negative film
    Exposure: unrecorded

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



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    LH0007_Nickel OSETI
    614,960
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