• Images in this collection were created and are copyrighted by Laurie Hatch. The photographs are made available by agreement with W. M. Keck Observatory and University of California Observatories.

    Permission to download, reproduce, publish, copy, transmit electronically, or display on websites must first be obtained from Laurie. Please direct all image acquisition and use inquiries to Laurie. Academic, Commercial, and Publisher inquiries are invited.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to W. M. Keck Observatory and University of California Observatories for generous staff assistance in producing these images.

    Your comments and feedback are welcome

    lh@lauriehatch.comwww.lauriehatch.com

    © 2002-2011 Laurie Hatch ★ use by permission only

     

    All photographs and text elements on this site

    are property of Laurie Hatch Photography ~

    Copyright 1999-2011 Laurie Hatch ~ all rights reserved.

    Use only by permission. Do not reproduce, publish, copy, or transmit in any form,

    including electronically on the Internet or World Wide Web, without written consent

    from the photographer. Thank you for respecting intellectual property rights

    protected by United States and International Copyright Treaty Laws.

     

    Magazine covers and article pages shown on this site

    are property of, and appear by courtesy of the respective publishers.

     

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  • "i" is for Information :: Image Names :: Descriptions

    On the navigation bar below, click "i" to read about each portfolio when it opens, and descriptions for each image contained within. Click "i" again to close the pop up window.

    For example: Several astronomy photos feature contributions written by observers about their forefront research with the telescopes when the shutter was clicked.

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    SANTA CRUZ
    CALIFORNIA

    2005 December 3

    Dr. Jerry Nelson constructs a model of his next telescope.

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII
    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawai‘i, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wakea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawai‘i.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 17-35 mm f/2.8 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 200  /  f/22
    Exposure: 1/45 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.

    The photographer thanks Dr. Nelson and UCO / Lick Observatory staff for their support of this documentary endeavor.


    LINKS:

    University of California Observatories ~ UCO

    Lick Observatory ~ Mount Hamilton

    ____________________________________________________________________________

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    LH0991_Jerry Nelson
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    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 January 29

    The Keck II Laser Guide Star probes the sky as a waxing moon ascends above the summit of Mauna Kea in this view from the Keck Observatory rooftop.

    Read about PHOTOGRAPHING THE LASER

    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS /
    LASER GUIDE STAR ~ AO/LGS

    Many celestial objects are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary new technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 12-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding substantially better data than would otherwise be possible.

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 12-24 DX f/4 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/4.
    Exposures: 30 and 60 seconds

    Multi-Frame / High Definition Range / Digitally Composited Panorama

    PUBLICATIONS

    Read about how the Smithsonian laser images were photographed.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star

    UCLA ~ OSIRIS Spectrograph 

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    Sincere gratitude is extended to W. M. Keck Observatory and University of California Observatories astronomers and staff, as well as VIS Rangers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.

     

    My assistant and I wish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community.  We are most fortunate to have had the opportunity to photograph on this mountain.

    PUBLISHERS ~ The high resolution image is available in horizonal and vertical formats.


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

    PHOTO GIFTS:
    Coming soon!

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    LH0759_Keck Rooftop LGS
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    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 January 30

    Spherical domes of the twin 10-meter telescopes are illuminated by the setting sun as a waxing moon rises above the island of Hawai‘i. In this view Keck I is in the foreground. First light was seen here in 1993. Keck II, 85 meters away, achieved first light in 1996. The dome shutters willl soon open to reveal gleaming primary mirrors cradled within, each comprising 35 hexagonal segments placed edge to edge in a honeycomb pattern, with 76 square meters of effective light-colleciton. Astronomers are preparing to observe throughout the night from Keck I and II control rooms at Kamuela headquarters, hoping to make unparalleled discoveries with these sensitive compound eyes.

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 DX f/3.5-f5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/20
    Exposure: 1/50 second

    Multi-Frame Digitally Composited Panorama

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    The photographer thanks the astronomers, and Keck and VIS staffs for their invaluable assistance and collaboration in producing this photograph. 

    PUBLISHERS ~ This image is also available in vertical format.


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

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    LH0760_Keck Rooftop Moonrise
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    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 April 4

    In this unusual view looking east from the Subaru Telescope catwalk, the nearby Keck I telescope and dome appear deceptively larger than the Keck II twin farther back. Yet they are identical, each with a 10-meter mirror and 37-meter dome.
     
    As dusk settles upon the summit, the Kecks “smile” briefly for the camera. The majestic sight is fleeting; in a few seconds the domes will darken and rotate toward the first objects of the night. From remote terminals at Keck Headquarters in Kamuela, astronomers are poised to begin their much-anticipated observations. 

    Directly behind the camera and less than a meter away, the unseen aluminum skin of the giant Subaru dome glides by in virtual silence. Astronomers in an adjacent control building are ready. What discoveries await this international cadre of observers tonight?

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 DX f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/8
    Exposure: 1.1 seconds
    Multi-frame Panoramic and HDR Digital Composite
    CCD Noise Correction

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Subaru Telescope

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    Sincere gratitude is extended to W. M. Keck Observatory and University of California Observatories astronomers and staff, as well as VIS Rangers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images. Mahalo nui loa to Subaru Telescope Director Hayashi, Associate Director Nishimura, and the Subaru staff for their gracious and memorable aloha hospitality.

    My assistant and Iwish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community.  We are most fortunate to have had the opportunity to photograph on this mountain.

    PUBLISHERS ~ A vertical cropping of this image is also available.


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

    PHOTO GIFTS:
    Coming soon!

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0936c_Keck View from Subaru
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    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 April 4

    In this unusual view looking east from the Subaru Telescope catwalk, the nearby Keck I telescope and dome appear deceptively larger than the Keck II twin farther back. Yet they are identical, each with a 10-meter mirror and 37-meter dome. 

    As dusk settles upon the summit, the Kecks “smile” briefly for the camera. The majestic sight is fleeting; in a few seconds the domes will darken and rotate toward the first objects of the night. From remote terminals at Keck Headquarters in Kamuela, astronomers are poised to begin their much-anticipated observations. 

    Directly behind the camera and less than a meter away, the unseen aluminum skin of the giant Subaru dome glides by in virtual silence. Astronomers in an adjacent control building are ready. What discoveries await this international cadre of observers tonight?

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 DX f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/8
    Exposure: 1.1 seconds
    Multi-frame Panoramic and HDR Digital Composite
    CCD Noise Correction

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Subaru Telescope

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    Sincere gratitude is extended to W. M. Keck Observatory and University of California Observatories astronomers and staff, as well as VIS Rangers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images. Mahalo nui loa to Subaru Telescope Director Hayashi, Associate Director Nishimura, and the Subaru staff for their gracious and memorable aloha hospitality.

    My assistant and Iwish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community.  We are most fortunate to have had the opportunity to photograph on this mountain. 

    PUBLISHERS ~ A vertical cropping of this image is also available.


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

    PHOTO GIFTS:
    Coming soon!

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

     

     

    LH0936kf_Keck View From Subaru
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    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 April 4

    In this unusual view looking east from the Subaru Telescope catwalk, the nearby Keck I telescope and dome appear deceptively larger than the Keck II twin farther back. Yet they are identical, each with a 10-meter mirror and 37-meter dome.
     
    As dusk settles upon the summit, the Kecks “smile” briefly for the camera. The majestic sight is fleeting; in a few seconds the domes will darken and rotate toward the first objects of the night. From remote terminals at Keck Headquarters in Kamuela, astronomers are poised to begin their much-anticipated observations. 

    To the right of the Keck Telescopes in the background, are the Canada-France Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), Gemini Northern Telescope, University of Hawaii 2.2m Telescope, United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT), and University of Hawaii 0.6m Telescope. Visitor tour vehicles are seen on the ridge between the latter two facilities.

    At far right and less than a meter away from the camera, the dusk-tinted aluminum skin of the giant Subaru dome glides by in virtual silence. Astronomers in an adjacent control building are ready. What discoveries await this international cadre of observers tonight?

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 DX f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/8
    Exposure: 1.1 seconds
    Multi-frame Digitally Composited High Definition Range Panorama (spanning 130 degrees)
    CCD Noise Correction

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Subaru Telescope

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    Sincere gratitude is extended to W. M. Keck Observatory and University of California Observatories astronomers and staff, as well as VIS Rangers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images. Mahalo nui loa to Subaru Telescope Director Hayashi, Associate Director Nishimura, and the Subaru staff for their gracious and memorable aloha hospitality.

    My assistant and Iwish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community.  We are most fortunate to have had the opportunity to photograph on this mountain.

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0936_Keck Pano View From Subaru
    1280,275
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    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 April 4

    12"x36" POSTER and GALLERY PRINT

    Proceeds from sales of this image will benefit the Hoku Scholarship Fund for Hawaii Students.

    In this 180 degree panoramic view looking east from the Subaru Telescope catwalk, the nearby Keck I telescope and dome appear deceptively larger than the Keck II twin farther back. Yet they are identical, each with a 10-meter mirror and 37-meter dome.
     
    As dusk settles upon the summit, the Kecks “smile” briefly for the camera. The majestic sight is fleeting; in a few seconds the domes will darken and rotate toward the first objects of the night. From remote terminals at Keck Headquarters in Kamuela, astronomers are poised to begin their much-anticipated observations. 

    To the right of the Keck Telescopes in the background, are the Canada-France Hawai‘i Telescope (CFHT), Gemini Northern Telescope, University of Hawai‘i 2.2m Telescope, United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT), and University of Hawai‘i 0.9m Telescope. Visitor tour vehicles are seen on the ridge between the latter two facilities.

    At far right and less than a meter away from the camera, the dusk-tinted aluminum skin of the giant Subaru dome glides by in virtual silence. Astronomers in an adjacent control building are ready. What discoveries await this international cadre of observers tonight?

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 DX f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/8Exposure: 1.1 seconds
    Multi-frame Digitally Composited High Definition Range Panorama (spanning 130 degrees)
    CCD Noise Correction

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Subaru Telescope

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    Sincere gratitude is extended to W. M. Keck Observatory and University of California Observatories astronomers and staff, as well as VIS Rangers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images. Mahalo nui loa to Subaru Telescope Director Hayashi, Associate Director Nishimura, and the Subaru staff for their gracious and memorable aloha hospitality.

    My assistant and I wish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community.  We are most fortunate to have had the opportunity to photograph on this mountain.

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0936p_KeckToSubaruPanorama_12"x36" Poster
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    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    14"x28" POSTER and GALLERY PRINT

    Also available as a 10"x20" Poster and Print

    Proceeds from sales of this image will benefit the Hoku Scholarship Fund for Hawaii Students.

    2007 April 4

    In this unusual view looking east from the Subaru Telescope catwalk 12 meters above the ground, the nearby Keck I telescope and dome appear deceptively larger than the Keck II twin farther back. Yet they are identical, each with a 10-meter mirror and 37-meter dome.
     
    As dusk settles upon the summit, the Kecks “smile” briefly for the camera. The majestic sight is fleeting; in a few seconds the domes will darken and rotate toward the first objects of the night. From remote terminals at Keck Headquarters in Kamuela, astronomers are poised to begin their much-anticipated observations.

    Composited into the sky is the Helix Nebula (NGS 7293), a combined image from NASA's spitzer Space Telescope and the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). Photo credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech. The following text is quoted from the NASA website:

    Helix Nebula - Unraveling at the Seams

    A dying star is throwing a cosmic tantrum in this combined image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), which NASA has lent to the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. In death, the star's dusty outer layers are unraveling into space, glowing from the intense ultraviolet radiation being pumped out by the hot stellar core.

    This object, called the Helix nebula, lies 650 light-years away, in the constellation of Aquarius. Also known by the catalog number NGC 7293, it is a typical example of a class of objects called planetary nebulae. Discovered in the 18th century, these cosmic works of art were erroneously named for their resemblance to gas-giant planets.


    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 DX f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/8
    Exposure: 1.1 seconds

    Multi-frame Digitally Composited Panorama (spanning nearly 180 degrees)

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Subaru Telescope

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    Sincere gratitude is extended to W. M. Keck Observatory and University of California Observatories astronomers and staff, as well as VIS Rangers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images. Mahalo nui loa to Subaru Telescope Director Hayashi, Associate Director Nishimura, and the Subaru staff for their gracious and memorable aloha hospitality..

    My assistant and I wish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community.  We are most fortunate to have had the opportunity to photograph on this mountain.


    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0935_Keck_HelixNebula_Composite 14"x28" Poster
    480,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 April 6

    OBSERVING PROGRAM:

    Using the Keck II 10-meter telescope shown in this photograph, Caltech astronomer Nick Scoville is observing remotely from a control room at Keck Headquarters in Kamuela. He and his colleagues Peter Capak (Caltech), James Larkin (UCLA), and Shelley Wright (UCLA) are looking at some of the most energetic objects in the universe—quasi-stellar objects, otherwise known as quasars. A quasar is an extremely luminous active galactic nucleus harboring a supermassive black hole which is devouring prodigious amounts of matter. The team is hoping to detect as-yet-unseen host galaxies that spawned the highly visible quasars in the early universe. It is anticipated that Larkin’s innovative OSIRIS spectrograph will separate the relatively bright quasar point source light from the much more subtle light emitted by its host galaxy. 

    OSIRIS was designed by Larkin to work specifically with the Keck AO system and to dissect tiny portions of the sky. It can analyze light from over 3000 adjacent regions simultaneously, allowing astronomers to measure the chemical makeup of objects, as well as rotations and more complex motions over an extended area.

    Nick Scoville and Shelley Wright explain the program in more detail:

    "Our project was aimed at detecting host galaxies of the highest redshift quasars within the SLOAN survey. These are at redshift 6, corresponding to only one billion years after the Big Bang. Although the quasars are easily detected, host galaxies have never been seen. Yet given what we know about quasars in the local universe, the hosts should be detectable as long as one can separate bright quasar light from the host galaxy. This experiment provides a unique opportunity to observe the most massive galaxies when they were young in the early universe. The combination of high spatial resolution from the Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star system and OSIRIS' ability to disentangle light from the quasar and host galaxy makes this project viable."

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 DX f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/4.8
    Exposures:  1/20 and 1/160 second
    Multi-frame Digitally Composited High Dynamic Range Panorama

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    UCLA ~ OSIRIS Spectrograph 

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to W. M. Keck Observatory and University of California Observatories astronomers and staff, as well as VIS Rangers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.


    My assistant and I wish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community.  We are most fortunate to have had the opportunity to photograph on this mountain.

    

    PUBLISHERS ~ This image is also available in vertical format.


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

    PHOTO GIFTS:
    Coming soon!

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0993_KeckII_IslandSunset
    1024,379
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 February 3

    Premier among the world’s largest telescopes, the twin Keck 10-meter mirrors are each comprised of 36 hexagonal mirror segments placed edge-to-edge to form a continuous reflecting surface of 76 square meters. They collect light from celestial objects unimaginably far away. In this photograph the telescopes are seen through open dome shutters just after sunset, as astronomers and technicians prepare for the night’s observing. Fortunately, winds on the summit have diminished to a mere 40 mph; during the previous evening wind gusts were clocked at 120 mph, and observatories on the Mauna Kea summit were closed through the night. Astronomers are more hopeful this evening.

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 DX f/3.5-f5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/5.3
    Exposure: 1/8 second
    Multi-frame Digitally Composited High Definition Range Panorama

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    Sincere gratitude is extended to W. M. Keck Observatory and University of California Observatories astronomers and staff, as well as VIS Rangers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.


    My assistant and I wish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community.  We are most fortunate to have had the opportunity to photograph on this mountain.

     

    PUBLISHERS ~ This image is also available in vertical format.


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

    PHOTO GIFTS:
    Coming soon!

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0700c_Twin Keck Sunset
    1024,768
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 February 3

    Premier among the world’s largest telescopes, the twin Keck 10-meter mirrors are each comprised of 36 hexagonal mirror segments placed edge-to-edge to form a continuous reflecting surface of 76 square meters. They collect light from celestial objects unimaginably far away. In this photograph the telescopes are seen through open dome shutters just after sunset, as astronomers and technicians prepare for the night’s observing. Fortunately, winds on the summit have diminished to a mere 40 mph; during the previous evening wind gusts were clocked at 120 mph, and observatories on the Mauna Kea summit were closed through the night. Astronomers are more hopeful this evening.

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 DX f/3.5-f5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/5.3
    Exposure: 1/8 secondMulti-frame Digitally Composited High Definition Range Panorama
    Multi-frame Digitally Composited High Definition Range Panorama

    This vertical panorama was "stitched" together in the digital darkroom using four smaller frames shot in immediate succession.
     

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    The photographer thanks the astronomers, and Keck and VIS staffs for their invaluable assistance and collaboration in producing this photograph. 

    PUBLISHERS ~ This image is also available in horizontal format.


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

    PHOTO GIFTS:
    Coming soon!

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0700p_Twin Keck Sunset
    442,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 April 5

    Read about PHOTOGRAPHING THE LASER

    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS /
    LASER GUIDE STAR ~ AO/LGS

    Many celestial objects are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary new technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 12-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding substantially better data than would otherwise be possible.

    OBSERVING PROGRAM:

    In this fifteen-minute digital exposure the moon has just crested the summit of Mauna Kea unseen behind the camera, illuminating domes and the surrounding volcanic landscape. Paths of stars and the Keck II laser are traced on the sky high above urban lights of Kamuela. Just above Keck I and Subaru domes at mid-left can be found the red-colored Orion Nebula within its parent constellation; it outlines a part of the imaginary sword that hangs from the mythical hunter’s three-star belt. This constellation is known to Hawaiians as Puuhonua or “Place of Refuge”. 

    Using the Keck II 10-meter telescope, Caltech astronomer Nick Scoville is observing remotely from a control room at Keck Headquarters in Kamuela. He and his colleagues Peter Capak (Caltech), James Larkin (UCLA), and Shelley Wright (UCLA) are looking at some of the most energetic objects in the universe—quasi-stellar objects, otherwise known as quasars. A quasar is an extremely luminous active galactic nucleus harboring a supermassive black hole which is devouring prodigious amounts of matter. The team is hoping to detect as-yet-unseen host galaxies that spawned the highly visible quasars in the early universe. It is anticipated that Larkin’s innovative OSIRIS spectrograph will separate the relatively bright quasar point source light from the much more subtle light emitted by its host galaxy. 

    OSIRIS was designed by Larkin to work specifically with the Keck AO system and to dissect tiny portions of the sky. It can analyze light from over 3000 adjacent regions simultaneously, allowing astronomers to measure the chemical makeup of objects, as well as rotations and more complex motions over an extended area.

    Nick Scoville and Shelley Wright explain the program in more detail:

    "Our project was aimed at detecting host galaxies of the highest redshift quasars within the SLOAN survey. These are at redshift 6, corresponding to only one billion years after the Big Bang. Although the quasars are easily detected, host galaxies have never been seen. Yet given what we know about quasars in the local universe, the hosts should be detectable as long as one can separate bright quasar light from the host galaxy. This experiment provides a unique opportunity to observe the most massive galaxies when they were young in the early universe. The combination of high spatial resolution from the Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star system and OSIRIS' ability to disentangle light from the quasar and host galaxy makes this project viable."

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 10.5 DX f/2.8 fisheye lens
    ISO digital: 125  /  f/2.8
    Exposure: 901 seconds
    Digital High Definition Range Imaging
    Exposure and CCD Noise Corrections

    A digital perspective correction filter was subsequently applied to the image file to restore fisheye distortion to a rectillinear view.

    PUBLICATIONS

    This photograph illustrated Robert Irion's superb feature article as a cover for the 2008 April Smithsonian Magazine. I was honored to provide the interior feature image as well. The cover and interior photograph can be seen on my Bibliography page.

    Read about how the Smithsonian laser images were photographed.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star

    UCLA ~ OSIRIS Spectrograph 

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    Hawaiian Star Compass

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to W. M. Keck Observatory and University of California Observatories astronomers and staff, as well as VIS Rangers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.

     

    My assistant and I wish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community.  We are most fortunate to have had the opportunity to photograph on this mountain.

     


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

    PHOTO GIFTS:
    Coming soon!

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0991v_Keck LGS Moonlight
    736,960
    Price On Request
  • S M I T H S O N I A N   M A G A Z I N E     

    April 2008 COVER + Interior Feature     Author: Robert Irion   (Image courtesy of Smithsonian Magazine)

    Read about Photographing the Laser     See more photos: Keck Observatory Portfolio

    'Smithsonian Magazine' April 2008 Interior Feature
    590,739
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 April 5

    Read about PHOTOGRAPHING THE LASER

    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS /
    LASER GUIDE STAR ~ AO/LGS

    Many celestial objects are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary new technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 12-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding substantially better data than would otherwise be possible.

    OBSERVING PROGRAM:

    In this fifteen-minute digital exposure the moon has just crested the summit of Mauna Kea unseen behind the camera, illuminating domes and the surrounding volcanic landscape. Paths of stars and the Keck II laser are traced on the sky high above urban lights of Kamuela. Just above Keck I and Subaru domes at mid-left can be found the red-colored Orion Nebula within its parent constellation; it outlines a part of the imaginary sword that hangs from the mythical hunter’s three-star belt. This constellation is known to Hawaiians as Puuhonua or “Place of Refuge”. 

    Using the Keck II 10-meter telescope, Caltech astronomer Nick Scoville is observing remotely from a control room at Keck Headquarters in Kamuela. He and his colleagues Peter Capak (Caltech), James Larkin (UCLA), and Shelley Wright (UCLA) are looking at some of the most energetic objects in the universe—quasi-stellar objects, otherwise known as quasars. A quasar is an extremely luminous active galactic nucleus harboring a supermassive black hole which is devouring prodigious amounts of matter. The team is hoping to detect as-yet-unseen host galaxies that spawned the highly visible quasars in the early universe. It is anticipated that Larkin’s innovative OSIRIS spectrograph will separate the relatively bright quasar point source light from the much more subtle light emitted by its host galaxy. 

    OSIRIS was designed by Larkin to work specifically with the Keck AO system and to dissect tiny portions of the sky. It can analyze light from over 3000 adjacent regions simultaneously, allowing astronomers to measure the chemical makeup of objects, as well as rotations and more complex motions over an extended area.

    Nick Scoville and Shelley Wright explain the program in more detail:

    "Our project was aimed at detecting host galaxies of the highest redshift quasars within the SLOAN survey. These are at redshift 6, corresponding to only one billion years after the Big Bang. Although the quasars are easily detected, host galaxies have never been seen. Yet given what we know about quasars in the local universe, the hosts should be detectable as long as one can separate bright quasar light from the host galaxy. This experiment provides a unique opportunity to observe the most massive galaxies when they were young in the early universe. The combination of high spatial resolution from the Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star system and OSIRIS' ability to disentangle light from the quasar and host galaxy makes this project viable."

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 10.5 DX f/2.8 fisheye lens
    ISO digital: 125  /  f/2.8
    Exposure: 901 seconds
    Digital High Definition Range Imaging
    Exposure and CCD Noise Corrections

    A digital perspective correction filter was subsequently applied to the image file to restore fisheye distortion to a rectillinear view.

    PUBLICATIONS

    This photograph illustrated Robert Irion's superb feature article as a cover for the 2008 April Smithsonian Magazine. I was honored to provide the interior feature image as well. The cover and interior photograph can be seen on my Bibliography page.

    Read about how the Smithsonian laser images were photographed.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star

    UCLA ~ OSIRIS Spectrograph 

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    Hawaiian Star Compass

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to W. M. Keck Observatory and University of California Observatories astronomers and staff, as well as VIS Rangers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.

     

    My assistant and I wish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community.  We are most fortunate to have had the opportunity to photograph on this mountain.

     


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

    PHOTO GIFTS:
    Coming soon!

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0991h_Keck LGS Moonlight
    1024,819
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

     

     LH0906h K2 LASER GUIDE STAR 

     

    2007 April 3

    Read about PHOTOGRAPHING THE LASER

     

    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS / LASER GUIDE STAR • AO/LGS

    Many celestial objects are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary new technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 12-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding substantially better data than would otherwise be possible.

     

    OBSERVING PROGRAM

    Using the Keck II 10-meter telescope shown in this photograph, Caltech astronomer Nick Scoville is observing remotely from a control room at Keck Headquarters in Kamuela. He and his colleagues Peter Capak (Caltech), James Larkin (UCLA), and Shelley Wright (UCLA) are looking at some of the most energetic objects in the universe—quasi-stellar objects, otherwise known as quasars. A quasar is an extremely luminous active galactic nucleus harboring a supermassive black hole which is devouring prodigious amounts of matter. The team is hoping to detect as-yet-unseen host galaxies that spawned the highly visible quasars in the early universe. It is anticipated that Larkin’s innovative OSIRIS spectrograph will separate the relatively bright quasar point source light from the much more subtle light emitted by its host galaxy. 

    OSIRIS was designed by Larkin to work specifically with the Keck AO system and to dissect tiny portions of the sky. It can analyze light from over 3000 adjacent regions simultaneously, allowing astronomers to measure the chemical makeup of objects, as well as rotations and more complex motions over an extended area.

    Nick Scoville and Shelley Wright explain the program in more detail:

    "Our project was aimed at detecting host galaxies of the highest redshift quasars within the SLOAN survey. These are at redshift 6, corresponding to only one billion years after the Big Bang. Although the quasars are easily detected, host galaxies have never been seen. Yet given what we know about quasars in the local universe, the hosts should be detectable as long as one can separate bright quasar light from the host galaxy. This experiment provides a unique opportunity to observe the most massive galaxies when they were young in the early universe. The combination of high spatial resolution from the Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star system and OSIRIS' ability to disentangle light from the quasar and host galaxy makes this project viable."

     

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA  •  SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 12-24 DX f/4 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 125  /  f/4.5
    Exposure: 300 seconds

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    A vertical version of this photograph was shown on the cover of 2007 September Optics and Photonics News.

    The photograph also illustrated Robert Irion's superb feature article in the 2008 April Smithsonian Magazine. I was honored to provide the Cover image as well. The cover and interior photograph can be seen on my Bibliography page. The article was republished in the Winter 2011 Smithsonian Magazine Collector Edition Mysteries of the Universe. This image was also featured in 2013 February Air and Space /Smithsonian Magazine / How Things Work.

    Read about how the Smithsonian laser images were photographed.



    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star

    UCLA ~ OSIRIS Spectrograph 

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    ‘Imiloa: Polynesian Star and Constellation Names

    Lessons of the Hawaiian Astronomers

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to W. M. Keck Observatory and University of California Observatories astronomers and staff, as well as VIS Rangers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images. My assistant and I wish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community.  We are most fortunate to have had the opportunity to photograph on this mountain.

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is also available in vertical format.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH0906h_K2 Laser Guide Star
    1024,768
    Price On Request
  • S M I T H S O N I A N   M A G A Z I N E     

    April 2008 COVER + Interior Feature     Author: Robert Irion   (Image courtesy of Smithsonian Magazine)

    Read about Photographing the Laser     See more photos: Keck Observatory Portfolio

    'Smithsonian Magazine' April 2008 Cover
    1024,739
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

     

     LH0906f K2 LASER GUIDE STAR 

     

    2007 April 3

    Read about PHOTOGRAPHING THE LASER

     

    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS / LASER GUIDE STAR • AO/LGS

    Many celestial objects are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary new technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 12-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding substantially better data than would otherwise be possible.

     

    OBSERVING PROGRAM

    Using the Keck II 10-meter telescope shown in this photograph, Caltech astronomer Nick Scoville is observing remotely from a control room at Keck Headquarters in Kamuela. He and his colleagues Peter Capak (Caltech), James Larkin (UCLA), and Shelley Wright (UCLA) are looking at some of the most energetic objects in the universe—quasi-stellar objects, otherwise known as quasars. A quasar is an extremely luminous active galactic nucleus harboring a supermassive black hole which is devouring prodigious amounts of matter. The team is hoping to detect as-yet-unseen host galaxies that spawned the highly visible quasars in the early universe. It is anticipated that Larkin’s innovative OSIRIS spectrograph will separate the relatively bright quasar point source light from the much more subtle light emitted by its host galaxy. 

    OSIRIS was designed by Larkin to work specifically with the Keck AO system and to dissect tiny portions of the sky. It can analyze light from over 3000 adjacent regions simultaneously, allowing astronomers to measure the chemical makeup of objects, as well as rotations and more complex motions over an extended area.

    Nick Scoville and Shelley Wright explain the program in more detail:

    "Our project was aimed at detecting host galaxies of the highest redshift quasars within the SLOAN survey. These are at redshift 6, corresponding to only one billion years after the Big Bang. Although the quasars are easily detected, host galaxies have never been seen. Yet given what we know about quasars in the local universe, the hosts should be detectable as long as one can separate bright quasar light from the host galaxy. This experiment provides a unique opportunity to observe the most massive galaxies when they were young in the early universe. The combination of high spatial resolution from the Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star system and OSIRIS' ability to disentangle light from the quasar and host galaxy makes this project viable."

     

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA  •  SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 12-24 DX f/4 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 125  /  f/4.5
    Exposure: 300 seconds

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    A vertical version of this photograph was shown on the cover of 2007 September Optics and Photonics News.

    The photograph also illustrated Robert Irion's superb feature article in the 2008 April Smithsonian Magazine. I was honored to provide the Cover image as well. The cover and interior photograph can be seen on my Bibliography page. The article was republished in the Winter 2011 Smithsonian Magazine Collector Edition Mysteries of the Universe. This image was also featured in 2013 February Air and Space /Smithsonian Magazine / How Things Work.

    Read about how the Smithsonian laser images were photographed.



    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star

    UCLA ~ OSIRIS Spectrograph 

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    ‘Imiloa: Polynesian Star and Constellation Names

    Lessons of the Hawaiian Astronomers

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to W. M. Keck Observatory and University of California Observatories astronomers and staff, as well as VIS Rangers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images. My assistant and I wish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community.  We are most fortunate to have had the opportunity to photograph on this mountain.

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is also available in vertical format.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH0906f_K2 Laser Guide Star
    638,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 April 2

    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS /
    LASER GUIDE STAR ~ AO/LGS

    Many celestial objects are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary new technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 12-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding substantially better data than would otherwise be possible.  

    OBSERVING PROGRAM:

    Principle Investigator Franck Marchis writes:  

    "Mike Wong and I are both researchers at the University of  California at Berkeley. We are searching for binary Jovian-Trojan asteroids, small satellites around these asteroids which are located along the orbit of Jupiter. Jovian-Trojan are distributed in two swarms of stable equilibrium points formed by the Jupiter-Sun system, placed in front and behind Jupiter. During this night, we recorded high angular resolution images of approximately 20 trojan asteroids located in the L5 (behind jupiter) Lagrange point. Using the companion, we want to measure the mass and density of these minor planets to know if they were formed in-situ or are captured icy planetesimals."

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 10.5mm DX f/2.8 fisheye lens
    ISO digital: 125  /  f/3.5
    Exposure: 60 seconds
    Exposure and CCD Noise Corrections

    A digital perspective correction filter was subsequently applied to the image file to restore fisheye distortion to a rectillinear view.

    Read more about LASER GUIDE STAR: Terrestrial Photography. This is primarily a discussion about the creation of two of my 2007 Keck Observatory laser images that illustrate author Robert Irion's feature article "Homing in on Black Holes" in the 2008 April Smithsonian Magazine. Although the image on this page did not appear in the magazine, logistics of photographing the laser still apply.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to W. M. Keck Observatory and University of California Observatories astronomers and staff, as well as VIS Rangers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.

     

     My assistant and I wish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community.  We are most fortunate to have had the opportunity to photograph on this mountain.

     


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

    PHOTO GIFTS:
    Coming soon!

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0903_KeckII_LGS
    1024,680
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 April 2

    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS /
    LASER GUIDE STAR ~ AO/LGS

    Many celestial objects are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary new technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 12-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding substantially better data than would otherwise be possible.  

    OBSERVING PROGRAM:

    Principle Investigator Franck Marchis writes:  

    "Mike Wong and I are both researchers at the University of  California at Berkeley. We are searching for binary Jovian-Trojan asteroids, small satellites around these asteroids which are located along the orbit of Jupiter. Jovian-Trojan are distributed in two swarms of stable equilibrium points formed by the Jupiter-Sun system, placed in front and behind Jupiter. During this night, we recorded high angular resolution images of approximately 20 trojan asteroids located in the L5 (behind jupiter) Lagrange point. Using the companion, we want to measure the mass and density of these minor planets to know if they were formed in-situ or are captured icy planetesimals."

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 10.5mm DX f/2.8 fisheye lens
    ISO digital: 125  /  f/3.5
    Exposure: 60 seconds
    Exposure and CCD Noise Corrections

    A digital perspective correction filter was subsequently applied to the image file to restore fisheye distortion to a rectillinear view.

    Read more about LASER GUIDE STAR: Terrestrial Photography. This is primarily a discussion about the creation of two of my 2007 Keck Observatory laser images that illustrate author Robert Irion's feature article "Homing in on Black Holes" in the 2008 April Smithsonian Magazine. Although the image on this page did not appear in the magazine, logistics of photographing the laser still apply.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to W. M. Keck Observatory and University of California Observatories astronomers and staff, as well as VIS Rangers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.

     

     My assistant and I wish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community.  We are most fortunate to have had the opportunity to photograph on this mountain.

     


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

    PHOTO GIFTS:
    Coming soon!

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0903p_KeckII_LGS
    1280,273
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 April 2

    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS /
    LASER GUIDE STAR ~ AO/LGS

    Many celestial objects are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary new technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 12-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding substantially better data than would otherwise be possible.  

    OBSERVING PROGRAM:

    Principle Investigator Franck Marchis writes:  

    "Mike Wong and I are both researchers at the University of  California at Berkeley. We are searching for binary Jovian-Trojan asteroids, small satellites around these asteroids which are located along the orbit of Jupiter. Jovian-Trojan are distributed in two swarms of stable equilibrium points formed by the Jupiter-Sun system, placed in front and behind Jupiter. During this night, we recorded high angular resolution images of approximately 20 trojan asteroids located in the L5 (behind jupiter) Lagrange point. Using the companion, we want to measure the mass and density of these minor planets to know if they were formed in-situ or are captured icy planetesimals."

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 10.5mm DX f/2.8 fisheye lens
    ISO digital: 125  /  f/3.5
    Exposure: 60 seconds
    Digitally Composited High Definition Range Imaging
    Exposure and CCD Noise Corrections

    A digital perspective correction filter was subsequently applied to the image file to restore fisheye distortion to a rectillinear view.

    Read more about LASER GUIDE STAR: Terrestrial Photography. This is primarily a discussion about the creation of two of my 2007 Keck Observatory laser images that illustrate author Robert Irion's feature article "Homing in on Black Holes" in the 2008 April Smithsonian Magazine. Although the image on this page did not appear in the magazine, logistics of photographing the laser still apply.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to W. M. Keck Observatory and University of California Observatories astronomers and staff, as well as VIS Rangers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.

     

     My assistant and I wish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community.  We are most fortunate to have had the opportunity to photograph on this mountain.

     


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

    PHOTO GIFTS:
    Coming soon!

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0900_K2 LGS K1 Too
    1024,680
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 February 3

    Spherical domes of the twin 10-meter telescopes are illuminated by the rising moon in this fifteen minute time exposure. Polaris is almost centered in this view looking directly north. The Keck I dome is on the left. First light was seen here in 1993. Keck II, on the right, achieved first light in 1996. The domes appear blurred due to their continual rotation to maintain alignment of their open shutters with the telescopes as celestial targets are tracked.

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 DX f/3.5-f5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/20
    Exposure: 15 minutes

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    WMKO: The Mirror

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    Sincere gratitude is extended to W. M. Keck Observatory and University of California Observatories astronomers and staff, as well as VIS Rangers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.

     

    My assistant and I wish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community.  We are most fortunate to have had the opportunity to photograph on this mountain.

    

    PUBLISHERS ~ This image is also available in vertical format.


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

    PHOTO GIFTS:
    Coming soon!

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

     

     

    LH0702h_Keck Polar Star Trails
    1024,768
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 February 3

    Spherical domes of the twin 10-meter telescopes are illuminated by the rising moon in this fifteen minute time exposure. Polaris is almost centered in this view looking directly north. The Keck I dome is on the left. First light was seen here in 1993. Keck II, on the right, achieved first light in 1996. The domes appear blurred due to their continual rotation to maintain alignment of their open shutters with the telescopes as celestial targets are tracked.

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 DX f/3.5-f5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/20
    Exposure: 15 minutes

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    WMKO: The Mirror

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    The photographer thanks the astronomers, and Keck and VIS staffs for their invaluable assistance and collaboration in producing this photograph. 

    PUBLISHERS ~ This image is also available in vertical format.


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

    PHOTO GIFTS:
    Coming soon!

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

     

     

    LH0702v_Keck Polar Star Trails
    640,963
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

     

     LH0989 KECK ZODIACAL LIGHT LGS

     

    2007 April 7

    Read about PHOTOGRAPHING THE LASER

     

    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS / LASER GUIDE STAR • AO/LGS

    Many celestial objects are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary new technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 12-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding substantially better data than would otherwise be possible.

    In this extended digtal exposure on a moonless night, the Keck II laser intersects light from Hoku-ao, or Venus— the night’s brightest object—as well as Na Huihui o Makali‘i, also known as the Pleiades star cluster, just above. Stars trace multi-hued pathways across the diffuse glow of Zodiacal Light on the horizon, which is produced by reflection of sunlight from particles of cosmic dust in our solar system. Near the upper left border of the photograph, the red-tinged Orion Nebula can be found within its parent constellation, outlining a part of the imaginary sword that hangs from the mythical hunter’s three-star belt. This constellation is known to Hawaiians as Pu‘uhonua or “Place of Refuge”.

     

    OBSERVING PROGRAM

    Using the Keck II 10-meter telescope shown in this photograph, Caltech astronomer Nick Scoville is observing remotely from a control room at Keck Headquarters in Kamuela. He and his colleagues Peter Capak (Caltech), James Larkin (UCLA), and Shelley Wright (UCLA) are looking at some of the most energetic objects in the universe—quasi-stellar objects, otherwise known as quasars. A quasar is an extremely luminous active galactic nucleus harboring a supermassive black hole which is devouring prodigious amounts of matter. The team is hoping to detect as-yet-unseen host galaxies that spawned the highly visible quasars in the early universe. It is anticipated that Larkin’s innovative OSIRIS spectrograph will separate the relatively bright quasar point source light from the much more subtle light emitted by its host galaxy. 

    OSIRIS was designed by Larkin to work specifically with the Keck AO system and to dissect tiny portions of the sky. It can analyze light from over 3000 adjacent regions simultaneously, allowing astronomers to measure the chemical makeup of objects, as well as rotations and more complex motions over an extended area.

    Nick Scoville and Shelley Wright explain the program in more detail:

    "Our project was aimed at detecting host galaxies of the highest redshift quasars within the SLOAN survey. These are at redshift 6, corresponding to only one billion years after the Big Bang. Although the quasars are easily detected, host galaxies have never been seen. Yet given what we know about quasars in the local universe, the hosts should be detectable as long as one can separate bright quasar light from the host galaxy. This experiment provides a unique opportunity to observe the most massive galaxies when they were young in the early universe. The combination of high spatial resolution from the Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star system and OSIRIS' ability to disentangle light from the quasar and host galaxy makes this project viable."

     

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA  •  SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 17-35 mm f/2.8 wide angle zoom lens
    ISO digital: 125 / f/2.8
    Exposure: 541 seconds

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    A vertical version of this photograph was shown on the cover of 2007 September Optics and Photonics News.

    The photograph also illustrated Robert Irion's superb feature article in the 2008 April Smithsonian Magazine. I was honored to provide the Cover image as well. The cover and interior photograph can be seen on my Bibliography page. The article was republished in the Winter 2011 Smithsonian Magazine Collector Edition Mysteries of the Universe. This image was also featured in 2013 February Air and Space /Smithsonian Magazine / How Things Work.

    Read about how the Smithsonian laser images were photographed.



    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star

    UCLA ~ OSIRIS Spectrograph 

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    ‘Imiloa: Polynesian Star and Constellation Names

    Lessons of the Hawaiian Astronomers

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to W. M. Keck Observatory and University of California Observatories astronomers and staff, as well as VIS Rangers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images. My assistant and I wish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community.  We are most fortunate to have had the opportunity to photograph on this mountain.

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is also available in vertical format.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH0989_Keck Zodiacal Light LGS
    638,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 April 5

    MONITORS: VIEWING THIS IMAGE

    Some images fare better than others on the huge diversity of computer monitor screens. Because this photograph has a broad and subtle gray-to-black gradient across the sky, monitors unable to display a full and seamless grayscale range from true white to true black will not accurately reproduce delicate transitions in this image. This will be particularly true for LCD displays.

    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS /
    LASER GUIDE STAR ~ AO/LGS

    Many celestial objects are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary new technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 12-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding substantially better data than would otherwise be possible.

    OBSERVING PROGRAM:

    In this extended film exposure on a moonless night, the Keck II laser intersects light from Hoku-ao, or Venus— the night’s brightest object—as well as Na Huihui o Makalii, also known as the Pleiades star cluster, just above. Stars trace multi-hued pathways across the diffuse glow of Zodiacal Light on the horizon, which is produced by reflection of sunlight from particles of cosmic dust in our solar system. Near the upper left border of the photograph, the red-colored Orion Nebula can be found within its parent constellation, outlining a part of the imaginary sword that hangs from the mythical hunter’s three-star belt. This constellation is known to Hawaiians as Puuhonua or “Place of Refuge”.

    Using the Keck II 10-meter telescope, Caltech astronomer Nick Scoville is observing remotely from a control room at Keck Headquarters in Kamuela. He and his colleagues Peter Capak (Caltech), James Larkin (UCLA), and Shelley Wright (UCLA) are looking at some of the most energetic objects in the universe—quasi-stellar objects, otherwise known as quasars. A quasar is an extremely luminous active galactic nucleus harboring a supermassive black hole which is devouring prodigious amounts of matter. The team is hoping to detect as-yet-unseen host galaxies that spawned the highly visible quasars in the early universe. It is anticipated that Larkin’s innovative OSIRIS spectrograph will separate the relatively bright quasar point source light from the much more subtle light emitted by its host galaxy. 

    OSIRIS was designed by Larkin to work specifically with the Keck AO system and to dissect tiny portions of the sky. It can analyze light from over 3000 adjacent regions simultaneously, allowing astronomers to measure the chemical makeup of objects, as well as rotations and more complex motions over an extended area.

    Nick Scoville and Shelley Wright explain the program in more detail:

    "Our project was aimed at detecting host galaxies of the highest redshift quasars within the SLOAN survey. These are at redshift 6, corresponding to only one billion years after the Big Bang. Although the quasars are easily detected, host galaxies have never been seen. Yet given what we know about quasars in the local universe, the hosts should be detectable as long as one can separate bright quasar light from the host galaxy. This experiment provides a unique opportunity to observe the most massive galaxies when they were young in the early universe. The combination of high spatial resolution from the Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star system and OSIRIS' ability to disentangle light from the quasar and host galaxy makes this project viable."

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Pentax 67ii, 45mm Pentax f/4 lens
    Provia 400 Color Reversal film
    Exposure: unrecorded (about 8-10 minutes)  @ f/4

    Mauna Kea is one of the most inspiring but challenging landscapes I have ever attempted to photograph. There were many failed attempts. This image was badly underexposed and borderline at best, in large part because it was necessary to close the shutter when the Keck II dome and laser changed positions halfway through the hoped-for fifteen-minute exposure. (Long exposures are often a gamble due to dome and telescope movements. Sometimes blurred domes in the resulting image look fine to my eye, sometimes not. Circumstances on this night were such that I decided to stop the exposure. Was it the "right" thing to do? I'll never know ... ) As a result, the film was etched with grain and even darker than the night. But the colorful beacons of laser, stars, and car traced a stark composition on the acetate, and none of my other images so nearly recorded the stunning Zodiacal Light in the way that I had seen it. Thus a heavy hand was applied in the digital darkroom to resuscitate the image and to overcome near-fatal deficiency in capture. I have tried to restore the raw image to convey what I experienced on the mountain.

    Read more about LASER GUIDE STAR: Terrestrial Photography. This is primarily a discussion about the creation of two of my 2007 Keck Observatory laser images that illustrate author Robert Irion's feature article "Homing in on Black Holes" in the 2008 April Smithsonian Magazine. Although the image on this page did not appear in the magazine, logistics of photographing the laser still apply.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star

    UCLA ~ OSIRIS Spectrograph 

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    Hawaiian Star Compass

    The photographer thanks the astronomers, and Keck and VIS staffs for their invaluable assistance and collaboration in producing this photograph. 


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

    PHOTO GIFTS:
    Coming soon!

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0990f_K2LGS Zodiacal Light
    753,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII


     LH0992v TWIN KECK STAR TRAILS 

     

    2007 April 6


    In this easterly view shortly before moonrise, the enormous domes of the Keck 10-meter twin telescopes seem diminuitive under the vast expanse of a star-filled sky. (Distortion in circularity of the star trail paths is a function of the 10.5 mm fisheye lens.).

     

    OBSERVING PROGRAM

    Using the Keck II 10-meter telescope shown in this photograph, Caltech astronomer Nick Scoville is observing remotely from a control room at Keck Headquarters in Kamuela. He and his colleagues Peter Capak (Caltech), James Larkin (UCLA), and Shelley Wright (UCLA) are looking at some of the most energetic objects in the universe—quasi-stellar objects, otherwise known as quasars. A quasar is an extremely luminous active galactic nucleus harboring a supermassive black hole which is devouring prodigious amounts of matter. The team is hoping to detect as-yet-unseen host galaxies that spawned the highly visible quasars in the early universe. It is anticipated that Larkin’s innovative OSIRIS spectrograph will separate the relatively bright quasar point source light from the much more subtle light emitted by its host galaxy. 

    OSIRIS was designed by Larkin to work specifically with the Keck AO system and to dissect tiny portions of the sky. It can analyze light from over 3000 adjacent regions simultaneously, allowing astronomers to measure the chemical makeup of objects, as well as rotations and more complex motions over an extended area.

    Nick Scoville and Shelley Wright explain the program in more detail:

    "Our project was aimed at detecting host galaxies of the highest redshift quasars within the SLOAN survey. These are at redshift 6, corresponding to only one billion years after the Big Bang. Although the quasars are easily detected, host galaxies have never been seen. Yet given what we know about quasars in the local universe, the hosts should be detectable as long as one can separate bright quasar light from the host galaxy. This experiment provides a unique opportunity to observe the most massive galaxies when they were young in the early universe. The combination of high spatial resolution from the Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star system and OSIRIS' ability to disentangle light from the quasar and host galaxy makes this project viable."

     

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA  •  SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O W?kea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 10.5 DX f/2.8 fisheye lens
    ISO digital: 125 / f/2.8
    Exposure: 901 seconds

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    A vertical version of this photograph was shown on the cover of 2007 September Optics and Photonics News.

    The photograph also illustrated Robert Irion's superb feature article in the 2008 April Smithsonian Magazine. I was honored to provide the Cover image as well. The cover and interior photograph can be seen on my Bibliography page. The article was republished in the Winter 2011 Smithsonian Magazine Collector Edition Mysteries of the Universe. This image was also featured in 2013 February Air and Space /Smithsonian Magazine? / How Things Work.

    Read about how the Smithsonian laser images were photographed.



    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star

    UCLA ~ OSIRIS Spectrograph 

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    ‘Imiloa: Polynesian Star and Constellation Names

    Lessons of the Hawaiian Astronomers

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to W. M. Keck Observatory and University of California Observatories astronomers and staff, as well as VIS Rangers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images. My assistant and I wish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community.  We are most fortunate to have had the opportunity to photograph on this mountain.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is also available in vertical format.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH0992v_Twin Keck Star Trails
    700,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII


     LH0992c TWIN KECK STAR TRAILS 

     

    2007 April 6


    In this easterly view shortly before moonrise, the enormous domes of the Keck 10-meter twin telescopes seem diminuitive under the vast expanse of a star-filled sky. (Distortion in circularity of the star trail paths is a function of the 10.5 mm fisheye lens.).

     

    OBSERVING PROGRAM

    Using the Keck II 10-meter telescope shown in this photograph, Caltech astronomer Nick Scoville is observing remotely from a control room at Keck Headquarters in Kamuela. He and his colleagues Peter Capak (Caltech), James Larkin (UCLA), and Shelley Wright (UCLA) are looking at some of the most energetic objects in the universe—quasi-stellar objects, otherwise known as quasars. A quasar is an extremely luminous active galactic nucleus harboring a supermassive black hole which is devouring prodigious amounts of matter. The team is hoping to detect as-yet-unseen host galaxies that spawned the highly visible quasars in the early universe. It is anticipated that Larkin’s innovative OSIRIS spectrograph will separate the relatively bright quasar point source light from the much more subtle light emitted by its host galaxy. 

    OSIRIS was designed by Larkin to work specifically with the Keck AO system and to dissect tiny portions of the sky. It can analyze light from over 3000 adjacent regions simultaneously, allowing astronomers to measure the chemical makeup of objects, as well as rotations and more complex motions over an extended area.

    Nick Scoville and Shelley Wright explain the program in more detail:

    "Our project was aimed at detecting host galaxies of the highest redshift quasars within the SLOAN survey. These are at redshift 6, corresponding to only one billion years after the Big Bang. Although the quasars are easily detected, host galaxies have never been seen. Yet given what we know about quasars in the local universe, the hosts should be detectable as long as one can separate bright quasar light from the host galaxy. This experiment provides a unique opportunity to observe the most massive galaxies when they were young in the early universe. The combination of high spatial resolution from the Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star system and OSIRIS' ability to disentangle light from the quasar and host galaxy makes this project viable."

     

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA  •  SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 10.5 DX f/2.8 fisheye lens
    ISO digital: 125 / f/2.8
    Exposure: 901 seconds

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    A vertical version of this photograph was shown on the cover of 2007 September Optics and Photonics News.

    The photograph also illustrated Robert Irion's superb feature article in the 2008 April Smithsonian Magazine. I was honored to provide the Cover image as well. The cover and interior photograph can be seen on my Bibliography page. The article was republished in the Winter 2011 Smithsonian Magazine Collector Edition Mysteries of the Universe. This image was also featured in 2013 February Air and Space /Smithsonian Magazine / How Things Work.

    Read about how the Smithsonian laser images were photographed.



    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star

    UCLA ~ OSIRIS Spectrograph 

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    ‘Imiloa: Polynesian Star and Constellation Names

    Lessons of the Hawaiian Astronomers

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to W. M. Keck Observatory and University of California Observatories astronomers and staff, as well as VIS Rangers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images. My assistant and I wish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community.  We are most fortunate to have had the opportunity to photograph on this mountain.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is also available in vertical format.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH0992c_Twin Keck Star Trails
    1024,768
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 April 3

    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS /
    LASER GUIDE STAR ~ AO/LGS

    Many celestial objects are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary new technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 12-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding substantially better data than would otherwise be possible.

    The laser guide-star beam has very little flare over the length of its 90-kilometer column. However, it appears here as an elongated fan shape due to the 180-second time exposure.The "fan" reveals and records the path of the laser sweeping across the sky as the moving telescope tracks the celestial object being observed. The blurred dome is evidence of continual rotation to maintain alignment of the open shutter with the telescope.

    The landscape is brightened by a newly-risen moon, disc illumination 98%.

    OBSERVING PROGRAM:

    Using the Keck II 10-meter telescope shown in this photograph, Caltech astronomer Nick Scoville is observing remotely from a control room at Keck Headquarters in Kamuela. He and his colleagues Peter Capak (Caltech), James Larkin (UCLA), and Shelley Wright (UCLA) are looking at some of the most energetic objects in the universe—quasi-stellar objects, otherwise known as quasars. A quasar is an extremely luminous active galactic nucleus harboring a supermassive black hole which is devouring prodigious amounts of matter. The team is hoping to detect as-yet-unseen host galaxies that spawned the highly visible quasars in the early universe. It is anticipated that Larkin’s innovative OSIRIS spectrograph will separate the relatively bright quasar point source light from the much more subtle light emitted by its host galaxy. 

    OSIRIS was designed by Larkin to work specifically with the Keck AO system and to dissect tiny portions of the sky. It can analyze light from over 3000 adjacent regions simultaneously, allowing astronomers to measure the chemical makeup of objects, as well as rotations and more complex motions over an extended area.

    Nick Scoville and Shelley Wright explain the program in more detail:

    "Our project was aimed at detecting host galaxies of the highest redshift quasars within the SLOAN survey. These are at redshift 6, corresponding to only one billion years after the Big Bang. Although the quasars are easily detected, host galaxies have never been seen. Yet given what we know about quasars in the local universe, the hosts should be detectable as long as one can separate bright quasar light from the host galaxy. This experiment provides a unique opportunity to observe the most massive galaxies when they were young in the early universe. The combination of high spatial resolution from the Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star system and OSIRIS' ability to disentangle light from the quasar and host galaxy makes this project viable."

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 12-24 DX f/4 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 125  /  f/4.5
    Exposure: 180 seconds

    Read more about LASER GUIDE STAR: Terrestrial Photography. This is primarily a discussion about the creation of two of my 2007 Keck Observatory laser images that illustrate author Robert Irion's feature article "Homing in on Black Holes" in the 2008 April Smithsonian Magazine. Although the image on this page did not appear in the magazine, logistics of photographing the laser still apply.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star

    UCLA ~ OSIRIS Spectrograph 

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    The photographer thanks the astronomers and Keck staff for their invaluable assistance and collaboration in producing this photograph. 


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

    PHOTO GIFTS:
    Coming soon!

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0911_Keck LGS North Sky
    638,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 April 2

    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS /
    LASER GUIDE STAR ~ AO/LGS

    Many celestial objects are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary new technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 12-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding substantially better data than would otherwise be possible.  

    OBSERVING PROGRAM:

    Principle Investigator Franck Marchis writes:  

    "Mike Wong and I are both researchers at the University of  California at Berkeley. We are searching for binary Jovian-Trojan asteroids, small satellites around these asteroids which are located along the orbit of Jupiter. Jovian-Trojan are distributed in two swarms of stable equilibrium points formed by the Jupiter-Sun system, placed in front and behind Jupiter. During this night, we recorded high angular resolution images of approximately 20 trojan asteroids located in the L5 (behind jupiter) Lagrange point. Using the companion, we want to measure the mass and density of these minor planets to know if they were formed in-situ or are captured icy planetesimals."

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 10.5mm DX f/2.8 fisheye lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/5.6
    Exposure: 601 seconds 

    Note shadows of three camera tripods at lower right. Not visible are piles of sandbags securing each of nine tripod legs from buffeting winds!

    A digital perspective correction filter was subsequently applied to the image file to restore fisheye distortion to a rectillinear view.

    Read more about LASER GUIDE STAR: Terrestrial Photography. This is primarily a discussion about the creation of two of my 2007 Keck Observatory laser images that illustrate author Robert Irion's feature article "Homing in on Black Holes" in the 2008 April Smithsonian Magazine. Although the image on this page did not appear in the magazine, logistics of photographing the laser still apply.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    The photographer thanks the astronomers and Keck staff for their invaluable assistance and collaboration in producing this photograph.


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

    PHOTO GIFTS:
    Coming soon!

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0890_Keck LGS Landscape
    638,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 January 29

    The spherical twin Keck telescope domes are seen in this sunny view looking northwest from the summit of Maun Kea. The Keck I dome is on the left; first light was seen here in 1993. Keck II, on the right, achieved first light in 1996. Inside the domes, teams of busy technicians are preparing for evening observations. The matched telescopes are among the largest in the world, each with a 10-meter mirror comprised of 36 hexagonal segments arranged edge-to-edge in a honeycomb pattern. This clever but exceedingly complex technology was revolutionary—and controversial—when first conceived in the 1970's. Astronomical achievements and discoveries made with these giant compound eyes are unparalleled.

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 DX f/3.5-f5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/13
    Exposure: 1/250 second

    Cropped from a multi-frame digitally composited panorama
    Native Resolution: 9444 x 4288 pixels
    14.3 x 31.5 inches / 36.32 x 79.9 cm at 300 ppi

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    WMKO: The Mirror

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to W. M. Keck Observatory and University of California Observatories astronomers and staff, as well as VIS Rangers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.

     

    My assistant and I wish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community.  We are most fortunate to have had the opportunity to photograph on this mountain.

    

    PUBLISHERS ~ This image is also available in vertical format.


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

    PHOTO GIFTS:
    Coming soon!

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0860_KeckSunnyPanorama
    1024,749
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 January 29

    A stark palette of red earth, white domes, and blue sky characterize the stunning Mauna Kea landscape. Small patches of snow melt in bright sun. A belt of round porthole vents in the twin Keck dome skins stabilize temperatures inside and out. Like giant hives, the domes enclose teams of busy technicians preparing for evening observations. The matched telescopes inside are among the largest in the world, each with a 10-meter mirror comprised of 36 hexagonal segments arranged edge-to-edge in a honeycomb pattern. This clever but exceedingly complex technology was revolutionary—and controversial—when first conceived in the 1970's. But astronomical achievements and discoveries made with these giant compound eyes are unparalleled.

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 DX f/3.5-f/5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/6.3
    Exposure: 1/1250 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    The photographer thanks Keck and VIS staffs for their invaluable assistance and collaboration in producing this photograph. 


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

    PHOTO GIFTS:
    Coming soon!

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0625_Red White Blue
    1024,680
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 January 29

    A stark palette of red earth, white Keck II dome, and blue sky characterize the stunning Mauna Kea landscape. Small patches of snow melt in bright sun as the photographer whimsically "grasps" the dome with her outstretched hand. A belt of round porthole vents in the dome skin stabilizes temperatures inside and out. Along with its unseen Keck I twin just out of the camera's view on the right, the domes enclose teams of busy technicians preparing for evening observations. The matched telescopes inside are among the largest in the world, each with a 10-meter mirror comprised of 36 hexagonal segments arranged edge-to-edge in a honeycomb pattern. This clever but exceedingly complex technology was revolutionary—and controversial—when first conceived in the 1970's. But astronomical achievements and discoveries made with these giant compound eyes are unparalleled.

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 10.5 mm f2.8 fisheye lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/13
    Exposure: 1/500 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    The photographer thanks Keck and VIS staffs for their invaluable assistance and collaboration in producing this photograph. 


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

    PHOTO GIFTS:
    Coming soon!

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0626_KeckII_Bowling Dome
    1024,768
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 January 30

    Premier among the world’s largest telescopes, the twin Keck 10-meter mirrors are each comprised of 36 hexagonal mirror segments placed edge-to-edge to form a continuous reflecting surface of 76 square meters. They collect light from celestial objects unimaginably far away. In this southeasterly view the telescopes are seen from the region known as "13 North".

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 DX f/3.5-f5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/5.3
    Exposure: 1/1250 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    The photographer thanks the astronomers, and Keck and VIS staffs for their invaluable assistance and collaboration in producing this photograph. 

    PUBLISHERS ~ This image is also available in horizontal format.


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

    PHOTO GIFTS:
    Coming soon!

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0650_Keck Domes 13 North
    638,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 January 29

    The twin Keck 10-meter mirrors are foremost among the world’s optical telescopes. Each is comprised of 36 hexagonal mirror segments placed edge-to-edge to form a continuous light-collecting surface of 76 square meters. This provides unprecedented sensitivity for observing celestial objects near and far. Shown here is a bird’s-eye view, close to the Keck II laser tube at the top left of the telescope and looking far down onto the primary mirror—a distance of about 30 meters. Note the technician's face and cap reflected on the tube surface plate.

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 12-24 DX f/4 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/18
    Exposure: 1 second / + strobe

    Read about photographing the laser. This is primarily a discussion about two of my 2007 Keck Observatory laser images that illustrate author Robert Irion's feature article "Homing in on Black Holes" in the 2008 April Smithsonian Magazine. Although the image on this page did not appear in the magazine, logistics of photographing the laser still apply.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    Sincere gratitude is extended to W. M. Keck Observatory and University of California Observatories astronomers and staff, as well as VIS Rangers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.

     

    My assistant and I wish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community.  We are most fortunate to have had the opportunity to photograph on this mountain.

    


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    LH0752_Laser Tube Top
    1024,714
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  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 January 29

    The twin Keck 10-meter mirrors are foremost among the world’s optical telescopes. Each is comprised of 36 hexagonal mirror segments placed edge-to-edge to form a continuous light-collecting surface of 76 square meters. This provides unprecedented sensitivity for observing celestial objects near and far. Shown here is a bird’s-eye view, close to the Keck II 1.4-meter secondary mirror housing at the top of the telescope and looking far down onto the primary mirror—a distance of 24.5 meters. The dome above is open and tropical blue daylight is reflected in the mirror. Note the technician’s tiny reflection in the lowermost 1.8-meter hexagonal segment and compare it to the gargantuan reflector.

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 DX f/3.5-f5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/16
    Exposure: 3 seconds
    This image is cropped from a multi-frame digitally composited and stacked high dynamic range panorama with an estimated horizontal sweep of approximately 110°.

     

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    WMKO: The Mirror

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to W. M. Keck Observatory and University of California Observatories astronomers and staff, as well as VIS Rangers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.

     

    My assistant and I wish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community.  We are most fortunate to have had the opportunity to photograph on this mountain.

    

    PUBLISHERS ~ This image is also available in vertical format.


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

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    LH0750h_Keck II Mirror
    1024,768
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  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 January 29

    The twin Keck 10-meter mirrors are foremost among the world’s optical telescopes. Each is comprised of 36 hexagonal mirror segments placed edge-to-edge to form a continuous light-collecting surface of 76 square meters. This provides unprecedented sensitivity for observing celestial objects near and far. Shown here is a bird’s-eye view, close to the Keck II 1.4-meter secondary mirror housing at the top of the telescope and looking far down onto the primary mirror—a distance of 24.5 meters. The dome above is open and tropical blue daylight is reflected in the mirror. Note the technician’s tiny reflection in the lowermost 1.8-meter hexagonal segment and compare it to the gargantuan reflector.

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 DX f/3.5-f5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/16
    Exposure: 3 seconds
    This image is cropped from a multi-frame digitally composited and stacked high dynamic range panorama with an estimated horizontal sweep of approximately 110°.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    WMKO: The Mirror

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    The photographer thanks the astronomers, and Keck and VIS staffs for their invaluable assistance and collaboration in producing this photograph. 

    PUBLISHERS ~ This image is also available in vertical format.


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

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    LH0750v_Keck II Mirror
    734,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 January 29

    The twin Keck 10-meter mirrors are foremost among the world’s optical telescopes. Each is comprised of 36 hexagonal mirror segments placed edge-to-edge to form a continuous light-collecting surface of 76 square meters. This provides unprecedented sensitivity for observing celestial objects near and far. Shown here is a bird’s-eye view, close to the Keck II 1.4-meter secondary mirror housing at the top of the telescope and looking far down onto the primary mirror—a distance of 24.5 meters. The dome above is open and tropical blue daylight is reflected in the mirror. Note the technician’s tiny reflection in the lowermost 1.8-meter hexagonal segment and compare it to the gargantuan reflector.

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 DX f/3.5-f5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100 / f/16
    Exposure: 3 seconds
    This image is cropped from a multi-frame digitally composited and stacked high dynamic range panorama with an estimated horizontal sweep of approximately 110°.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    WMKO: The Mirror

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    The photographer thanks the astronomers, and Keck and VIS staffs for their invaluable assistance and collaboration in producing this photograph. 

    PUBLISHERS ~ This image can be cropped to horizontal format.


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

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    LICENSING

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    LH0750p_Keck II Mirror
    456,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 January 29

    The twin Keck 10-meter mirrors are foremost among the world’s optical telescopes. Each is comprised of 36 hexagonal mirror segments placed edge-to-edge to form a continuous light-collecting surface of 76 square meters. This provides unprecedented sensitivity for observing celestial objects near and far. Shown here is a bird’s-eye view, close to the Keck II 1.4-meter secondary mirror housing at the top of the telescope and looking far down onto the primary mirror—a distance of 24.5 meters. The dome above is open and tropical blue daylight is reflected in the mirror. Note the technician’s tiny reflection in the lowermost 1.8-meter hexagonal segment and compare it to the gargantuan reflector.

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 DX f/3.5-f5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100 / f/16
    Exposure: 3 seconds
    This is a multi-frame digitally composited and stacked high dynamic range panorama with an estimated horizontal sweep of approximately 110°.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    WMKO: The Mirror

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    The photographer thanks the astronomers, and Keck and VIS staffs for their invaluable assistance and collaboration in producing this photograph. 

    PUBLISHERS ~ This image can be cropped to horizontal format.


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    Available now Email for size options and price quote

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    LH0750fp_Keck II Mirror Panorama
    388,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 April 4

    The twin Keck 10-meter mirrors are foremost among the world’s optical telescopes. Each mirror consists of a 36-segment honeycomb mosaic placed edge-to-edge to form a continuous light-collecting surface of 76 square meters. This provides unprecedented sensitivity for observing celestial objects near and far. Shown here is the Keck Mirror Barn, which houses mirror segments in the process of being cleaned and realuminized. Individual segments are 1.8 meters wide, 7.5 cemtimeters thick, and weigh about half a ton.

    This exacting study in reflections was set up by Optical Technician Tim Saloga, at rear.

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 10.5 DX f/2,8 fisheye lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/4
    Exposure: 1/50 second / + strobe

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    WMKO: The Mirror

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to W. M. Keck Observatory and University of California Observatories astronomers and staff, as well as VIS Rangers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.

     

    My assistant and I wish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community.  We are most fortunate to have had the opportunity to photograph on this mountain.

     


    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH1050_Mirror Barn Boys
    1024,683
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 March 30

    The twin Keck 10-meter mirrors are foremost among the world’s optical telescopes. Each mirror consists of a 36-segment honeycomb mosaic placed edge-to-edge to form a continuous light-collecting surface of 76 square meters. This provides unprecedented sensitivity for observing celestial objects near and far. The Keck II mirror segment backs and support structure are seen here at close range. The secondary mirror housing (silver cage mid left) appears deceptively close, but it is almost thirty meters away. A portion of the secondary mirror is visble inside the housing; upon its surface is a reflection of the 10-meter primary mirror.

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 DX f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/s8
    Exposure: 2.5 seconds / + strobe

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    WMKO: The Mirror

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    The photographer thanks the astronomers and Keck staff for their invaluable assistance and collaboration in producing this photograph. 


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

    PHOTO GIFTS:
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    LICENSING

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    LH0830_Keck II Mirror Back
    1024,680
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    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 January 28

    OBSERVING PROGRAM:

    Shelley Wright (left) and Michael McElwain (right) are finding a break during a long set of integrations using the Keck Observatory's Adaptive Optics system and the integral field spectrograph OSIRIS. When this photograph was made, both McElwain and Wright were part of the OSIRIS instrument team which helped in the implementation and commissioning of the instrument with Professor James Larkin at UC Los Angeles. Here they are attempting to image close planet companions to bright young stars.

    OSIRIS was designed by Larkin to work specifically with the Keck AO system and to dissect tiny portions of the sky. It can analyze light from over 3000 adjacent regions simultaneously, allowing astronomers to measure the chemical makeup of objects, as well as rotations and more complex motions over an extended area.

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 DX f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/6.3
    Exposure: 1/30 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star

    UCLA ~ OSIRIS Spectrograph 

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    The photographer thanks the astronomers and Keck staff for their invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. 


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    LH0641_Happy Astronomers
    1024,711
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    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 January 22

    OBSERVING PROGRAM:

    Astronomer Steven Vogt is searching for planets in the Keck I Control Room at Keck Headquarters in Kamuela. His observing colleague Paul Butler has stepped out of the room.

    Paul in K I Control Room

    Steve and Paul in K I Control Room

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 mm  DX f/3.5-5.6 zoom
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/6.3
    Exposure:  1/30 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    The photographer thanks the astronomers and Keck staff for their invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. 


    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

    LH0652_Steve Vogt Observing
    1024,768
    Price On Request
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    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 January 22

    OBSERVING PROGRAM:

    Astronomer Paul Butler discusses his planet search program in the Keck I Control Room at Keck Headquarters in Kamuela. The monitor on a shelf at upper left shows the Keck I Observing Assistant in a live video feed from the control room on the Mauna Kea summit. She has a monitor that is simultaneously showing Paul in Kamuela.

    Paul's observing colleague Steven Vogt has stepped out of the room.

    Steve in K I Control Room

    Steve and Paul in K I Control Room

     

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 mm  DX f/3.5-5.6 zoom
    ISO digital: 125 /  f/6.3
    Exposure:  1/30 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    The photographer thanks the astronomers and Keck staff for their invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. 


    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0651_Paul Butler Observing
    1024,680
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    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 January 22

    OBSERVING PROGRAM:

    Astronomers Paul Butler (left) and Steven Vogt (right) search for evidence of extrasolar planets on an array of monitors in the Keck I Control Room in Kamuela.

    Steve in K I Control Room

    Paul in K I Control Room

     

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 10.5mm  DX f/2.8 fisheye
    ISO digital: 125  /  f/6.3
    Exposure:  1/30 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    The photographer thanks the astronomers and Keck staff for their invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. 


    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0653_Butler and Vogt Observing
    1024,825
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 January 22

    OBSERVING PROGRAM:

    Dr. Filippenko writes:

    "UC Berkeley Professor of Astronomy Alex Filippenko (right) and his graduate student Ryan Foley
    (left) examine optical spectra of exploding stars (supernovae) obtained with the DEIMOS
    spectrograph on the Keck II telescope. Although the observers are located in the Keck II Control
    Room in Kamuela, they can see and converse with a telescope operator on the summit of Mauna
    Kea. They are especially interested in Type Ia supernovae, whose observed brightness as a
    function of redshift has been used to determine that the expansion of the Universe is currently
    accelerating, propelled by a mysterious "dark energy" that stretches the very fabric of space."

     

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAI`I

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 10.5 DX f/2.8 fisheye lens
    ISO digital: 125  /  f/5
    Exposure: 1/30 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    The photographer thanks the astronomers and Keck staff for their invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. 


    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0615_Alex Filippenko Observing
    1024,680
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 March 30

    The twin Keck 10-meter mirrors are foremost among the world’s optical telescopes. Each mirror consists of a 36-segment honeycomb mosaic placed edge-to-edge to form a continuous light-collecting surface of 76 square meters. This provides unprecedented sensitivity for observing celestial objects near and far. The telescope and dome are viewed here through a 180-degree fisheye lens. Structural supports for the mirror segments can be seen at lower left. The secondary mirror and housing are just right of center. The secondary structure is about thirty meters "above" the mirror.

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 DX f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/s8
    Exposure: 2.5 seconds / + strobe

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    WMKO: The Telescopes

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    The photographer thanks the astronomers and Keck staff for their invaluable assistance and collaboration in producing this photograph. 


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    LH0851_Keck II Interior
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    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 April 3


    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS / NATURAL GUIDE STAR
    ~ AO/NGS

    OBSERVING PROGRAM:

    Principle Investigator Franck Marchis writes:  

    "Franck Marchis & Mike Wong, both researchers at the University of California at Berkeley, are searching for binary Jovian-Trojan asteroids, small satellites around these asteroids which are located along the orbit of Jupiter. Jovian-Trojan are distributed in two swarms of stable equilibrium points formed by the Jupiter-Sun system, placed in front and behind Jupiter. During this night, they recorded high angular resolution images of ~20 trojan asteroids located in the L5 (behind jupiter) Lagrange point. Using the companion, they want to measure the mass and density of these minor planets to know if they were formed in-situ or are captured icy planetesimals."

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 12-24 DX f/4 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 125  /  f/4.5
    Exposure: 300 seconds

    PUBLICATIONS

    A vertical version of this photograph was shown on the cover of Optics and Photonics News, September 2007.

    The photograph also illustrated Robert Irion's superb feature article in the 2008 April Smithsonian Magazine. I was honored to provide the cover image as well. The cover and interior photograph can be seen on my Bibliography page.

    Read about how the Smithsonian laser images were photographed.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star

    UCLA ~ OSIRIS Spectrograph 

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    The photographer thanks the astronomers and Keck staff for their invaluable assistance and collaboration in producing this photograph. 

    PUBLISHERS ~ This high resolution image is available in horizontal and vertical formats.


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

    PHOTO GIFTS:
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    LICENSING

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    LH0897c_KeckII Natural Guide Star
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  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 April 3


    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS / NATURAL GUIDE STAR
    ~ AO/NGS

    OBSERVING PROGRAM:

    Principle Investigator Franck Marchis writes:  

    "Franck Marchis & Mike Wong, both researchers at the University of California at Berkeley, are searching for binary Jovian-Trojan asteroids, small satellites around these asteroids which are located along the orbit of Jupiter. Jovian-Trojan are distributed in two swarms of stable equilibrium points formed by the Jupiter-Sun system, placed in front and behind Jupiter. During this night, they recorded high angular resolution images of ~20 trojan asteroids located in the L5 (behind jupiter) Lagrange point. Using the companion, they want to measure the mass and density of these minor planets to know if they were formed in-situ or are captured icy planetesimals."

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 12-24 DX f/4 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 125  /  f/4.5
    Exposure: 300 seconds

    PUBLICATIONS

    A vertical version of this photograph was shown on the cover of Optics and Photonics News, September 2007.

    The photograph also illustrated Robert Irion's superb feature article in the 2008 April Smithsonian Magazine. I was honored to provide the cover image as well. The cover and interior photograph can be seen on my Bibliography page.

    Read about how the Smithsonian laser images were photographed.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star

    UCLA ~ OSIRIS Spectrograph 

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    The photographer thanks the astronomers and Keck staff for their invaluable assistance and collaboration in producing this photograph. 

    PUBLISHERS ~ This high resolution image is available in horizontal and vertical formats.


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote

    PHOTO GIFTS:
    Coming soon!

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

     

     

    LH0897f_KeckII Natural Guide Star
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    KECK OBSERVATORY
    MAUNA KEA SUMMIT
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 April 3

    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS /
    LASER GUIDE STAR ~ AO/LGS

    Many celestial objects are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary new technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 12-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding substantially better data than would otherwise be possible.

    The Laser Guide Star beam has very little flare over the length of its 90-kilometer column. However, it appears here as an elongated fan shape due to the nine-minute time exposure. The "fan" reveals and records the path of the laser sweeping across the sky as the moving telescope tracks the celestial object being observed.

    OBSERVING PROGRAM:

    Using the Keck II 10-meter telescope shown in this photograph, Caltech astronomer Nick Scoville is observing remotely from a control room at Keck Headquarters in Kamuela. He and his colleagues Peter Capak (Caltech), James Larkin (UCLA), and Shelley Wright (UCLA) are looking at some of the most energetic objects in the universe—quasi-stellar objects, otherwise known as quasars. A quasar is an extremely luminous active galactic nucleus harboring a supermassive black hole which is devouring prodigious amounts of matter. The team is hoping to detect as-yet-unseen host galaxies that spawned the highly visible quasars in the early universe. It is anticipated that Larkin’s innovative OSIRIS spectrograph will separate the relatively bright quasar point source light from the much more subtle light emitted by its host galaxy. 

    OSIRIS was designed by Larkin to work specifically with the Keck AO system and to dissect tiny portions of the sky. It can analyze light from over 3000 adjacent regions simultaneously, allowing astronomers to measure the chemical makeup of objects, as well as rotations and more complex motions over an extended area.

    Nick Scoville and Shelley Wright explain the program in more detail:

    "Our project was aimed at detecting host galaxies of the highest redshift quasars within the SLOAN survey. These are at redshift 6, corresponding to only one billion years after the Big Bang. Although the quasars are easily detected, host galaxies have never been seen. Yet given what we know about quasars in the local universe, the hosts should be detectable as long as one can separate bright quasar light from the host galaxy. This experiment provides a unique opportunity to observe the most massive galaxies when they were young in the early universe. The combination of high spatial resolution from the Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star system and OSIRIS' ability to disentangle light from the quasar and host galaxy makes this project viable."

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 12-24 DX f/4 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 125  /  f/8
    Exposure: 541 seconds

    Read more about LASER GUIDE STAR: Terrestrial Photography. This is primarily a discussion about the creation of two of my 2007 Keck Observatory laser images that illustrate author Robert Irion's feature article "Homing in on Black Holes" in the 2008 April Smithsonian Magazine. Although the image on this page did not appear in the magazine, logistics of photographing the laser still apply.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    W. M. Keck Observatory

    Keck Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star

    UCLA ~ OSIRIS Spectrograph 

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    The photographer thanks the astronomers, and Keck and VIS staffs for their invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. 


    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0910_Keck LGS Puu Poliahu
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    ONIZUKA CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL ASTRONOMY
    MAUNA KEA 
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 April 7

    This is a landscape as seen from the Mauna Kea summit.

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 200-400 f/4 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 125  /  f/8
    Exposure:1/ 125 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    The photographer thanks the VIS Rangers and staff for their invaluable assistance and collaboration in producing this photograph. 


    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH1125_ Mauna Kea Landscape
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    ONIZUKA CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL ASTRONOMY
    MAUNA KEA 
    ISLAND OF HAWAII

    2007 Feb 2

    Illuminated by the light of a just-past full moon, the Onizuka Center for International Astronomy is located at the 9200-foot / 2804-meter level on the southern slope of Mauna Kea. It is also known as Hale Pohaku (HP) or "House of Stone", named for the 1930's stone structures that remain standing today. HP astronomer and staff dormitories are seen in the middle left of the photograph; the Visitor Information Station is below and illuminated by red observing lights. The VIS is widely regarded as the best location on the planet for stargazing with amateur telescopes. Headlights on the highway trace the reluctant departure of visitors as the 10 pm closing time approaches.

    A VIEW FROM MAUNA KEA ~ SACRED MOUNTAIN OF HAWAII

    Mauna Kea holds profound religious and cultural significance for Native Hawaiians. It embodies their divine ancestral origins and connection to Creation. At 13,796 feet / 4,205 meters in elevation on the Island of Hawaii, it last erupted about 4400 years ago. The now-dormant volcano is only 120 feet higher than its active neighbor Mauna Loa 27 miles to the south. Seen from below and framed by palm trees and azure waters, the snow-cloaked summit of Mauna Kea inspires awe and veneration—its Hawaiian name means “White Mountain”. The star-filled sky above offers unsurpassed clarity for some of the world’s most advanced telescopes as they unravel mysteries of the universe. Upon its flanks are hallowed Hawaiian sites, ancient paths, rare plants and animals, and a unique and fragile ecosystem. Please walk gently and respectfully on Mauna O Wākea, the Sacred Mountain of Hawaii.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 DX f/3.5-f/5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/4.5
    Exposure: 121 seconds

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    Mauna Kea Visitor Information Station

    Imiloa: Astronomy Center of Hawaii

    Sincere gratitude is extended to W. M. Keck Observatory and University of California Observatories astronomers and staff, as well as VIS Rangers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.

     

    My assistant and I wish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community.  We are most fortunate to have had the opportunity to photograph on this mountain.

     


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    LH0800_Hale Pohaku View
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  • Visit the Mauna Kea Observatories Portfolio to see more photographs from the summit.

     Visit the Mauna Kea Observatories Portfolio for more ...
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