• "i" is for Information :: Image Names :: Descriptions

    On the navigation bar below, click "i" to read about each portfolio when it opens, and descriptions for each image contained within. Click "i" again to close the pop up window.

    For example: Several astronomy photos feature contributions written by observers about their forefront research with the telescopes when the shutter was clicked.

    "i" is for Information!
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  • Images in this collection were created and are copyrighted by Laurie Hatch. The photographs are made available by agreement with University of California Observatories.

    Permission to download, reproduce, publish, copy, transmit electronically, or display on websites must first be obtained from Laurie. Please direct all image acquisition and use inquiries to Laurie. Academic, Commercial, and Publisher inquiries are invited.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories for generous staff assistance in producing these images.

    Your comments and feedback are welcome

    lh@lauriehatch.comwww.lauriehatch.com

    © 2002-2011 Laurie Hatch ★ use by permission only

     

    All photographs and text elements on this site

    are property of Laurie Hatch Photography ~

     

    Copyright 1999-2011 Laurie Hatch ~ all rights reserved.

    Use only by permission. Do not reproduce, publish, copy, or transmit in any form,

    including electronically on the Internet or World Wide Web, without written consent

    from the photographer. Thank you for respecting intellectual property rights

     

     

     

     

    protected by United States and International Copyright Treaty Laws.

     

    Magazine covers and article pages shown on this site

    are property of, and appear by courtesy of the respective publishers.

     

     

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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH-RLOB_RETRO LICK OBSERVATORY POSTCARD 

    This 4.25" x 6" postcard can be purchased when you visit Mount Hamilton, or by mail order from the Lick Observatory Gift Shop.

    1999-2016


    Inspired by postcards of years gone by, this retro design features a lettered photographic composite of Lick Observatory and its major telescopes on the summit of Mount Hamilton. Image descriptions follow the list below. For additional information, please see individual image pages in my Lick Observatory Portfolio:

    OB: LH0002_LIGHTNING THUNDERSTORM 1999 September 8
    SE: LH0450_MOUNT HAMILTON SKYLINE 2006 May 14
    RV: LH0055_LICK REFRACTOR CLASSIC 2004 May 29
    A: LH0250_LICK O'LANTERN 2005 September 19
    T: LH0033_SHANE 3M LASER PANORAMA 2002 Winter
    O: LH2150_APF VENUS SUNSET 2007 June 16
    R: LH0061_KATZMAN AUTOMATIC IMAGING TELESCOPE 2004 June 1
    Y: LH7360_NICKEL-NIROSETI-CONJUNCTION 2015 October 26
      LH0051_SUNSETTE  BACKGROUND 2002 November

     

     

    "Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the Great Telescope."
                                                 

    ~ Lick Observatory Astronomer James Edward Keeler in The Engineer, 1888 July 6


    INDIVIDUAL IMAGE DESCRIPTIONS

    OB: LH0002_LIGHTNING THUNDERSTORM
    1999 September 8
    In this one-minute time exposure looking west from Kepler Peak, a turbulent cloud hurtles lightning into Mt. Hamilton foothills. Across Silicon Valley, more bolts shock the Santa Cruz Mountains twenty miles away. Thunder rumbles across hillsides announcing repeated strikes. Sheets of rain drench valley neighborhoods. It is a spectacle of rare intensity on Mt. Hamilton, and one that will continue past daybreak. Domes remain closed for the duration of the storm, shielding telescopes from the assault.

    SE: LH0450_MOUNT HAMILTON SKYLINE
    2006 May 14
    An early 20th century travel booklet states: “It is a liberal education to visit Mt. Hamilton. The vastness of the universe, the achievements of science are sufficient to fill the heart and to occupy the mind of the most intellectual and ambitious.” Formerly known as La Sierra Ysabel, “The Ham” is now populated by ten telescopes whose ages span over 130 years. Looking east from left to right, foreground: The Main Building houses the 40“ Nickel Reflector on the left; the larger open dome of the Lick 36” Refractor is right. In the middle ground are four domes left to right (only three are readily visible): the silver Crocker dome, the large Shane 3-meter Reflector, the Carnegie Astrograph (virtually hidden), and the 2.4-meter Automated Planet Finder (APF). The dome of the 0.76-meter Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT) is in the center background.

    RV: LH0055_LICK REFRACTOR CLASSIC
    2004 May 29
    Lick Observatory Website: Great Lick Refractor
    The Lick 36” Refractor is seen through the encompassing eye of a 180-degree fisheye lens. It is challenging to capture the unique ambience inside this enormous Victorian structure. Perhaps the experience is described most eloquently by early Lick Director and accomplished astronomer James Keeler in a fascinating article written for the 1888 July 6 issue of The Engineer: “Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the great telescope.”  Both dome and telescope were technological marvels in their day, and have seen many seminal discoveries. Occasionally used in its second century for research, this venerable telescope frequently inspires visiting classes and summer visitors with enchanting views of the heavens.

    A: LH0250_LICK O'LANTERN
    2005 September 19
    Reminiscent of a gargantuan Halloween pumpkin, this 'Lick O’Lantern' was photographed two nights after the full Harvest Moon. Disk illumination of this waning gibbous moon is 94%, with shadows of craters visible on the upper right edge, or 'limb'. The summit of Mt. Hamilton is seen through an 8” reflector telescope from a location 15.7 miles away in San José, on a compass bearing of 79°. The open dome slit of the Lick 36” Refractor and windows of the Main Building are brightly lit — an uncommon sight after dark. Also seen in silhouette against the lower left limb of the moon is the round dome of the Shane 3-meter Reflector. Careful calculation and planning are required to determine the precise time and coordinates from which to view this alignment. The moon rises in a different but predictable place every day. (See LH0250 image page for additional information.)

    T: LH0033_LASER PANORAMA
    2002 Winter
    Lick Observatory Website: Shane 3-meter Reflector
    The Shane 120" Reflector was the second largest telescope in the world when it was completed in 1959. It bears the name of former Lick Observatory director and astronomer Donald Shane, who spearheaded its development. The mirror was originally a test blank for the Palomar 200" Reflector, then the world’s largest telescope. (Pyrex glass was invented specifically for use in these mirrors.) Although the Shane is modest in size by current standards, state-of-the-art research progresses in several fields, including adaptive optics and laser guide-star programs. Using the incomparable Hamilton Spectrograph, the Shane is a leader in discovering planets orbiting nearby stars.

    ADAPTIVE OPTICS / LASER GUIDE STAR

    Many celestial images are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary new technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 12-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding substantially better data than would otherwise be possible.    

    This panorama encompasses a vertical, circular sweep of approximately 120°.  Imagine that you are taking this picture and looking at the telescope dome. The moon would actually be shining on the back of your shoulders! The image is a composite of eleven separate 60mm x 70mm medium format exposures. They range from one minute in duration for telescope, dome, and laser, to five minutes each for five successive vertical star trail shots. To ensure clarity of detail, the moon was exposed on yet another frame for only a fraction of a second – the moon is surprisingly bright. Film is limited in its ability to capture a broad range of light conditions, and night shots can be particularly finicky. Thus the only means of representing all light values present was to shoot various areas separately. All transparencies were then scanned, and digitally stitched together on a computer using Photoshop, requiring over 160 hours of "digital darkroom" time.

    In the right parking area, an “aircraft spotter” is positioned to watch for planes in the vicinity. Staring directly into the 12-watt laser beam could injure a pilot’s eyes, although this possibility is extremely remote, if not virtually impossible. Nevertheless, extra care is taken to avoid any harm. Armed with a kill switch, the spotter can extinguish the laser at any time. The Observatory works closely with the Air Force Space Command and Federal Aviation Administration to ensure that no satellites or aircraft will be in the immediate area during laser propagation, so the spotter doesn’t get to use the switch very often. Because of the long time exposure, the bright red light on the kill switch has illuminated the spotter. Red areas on the pavement on either side of the spotter probably represent a short period of time when the spotter left her chair and walked about with the switch. Only the red light shows on film due to its brightness; the spotter’s clothing did not reflect enough moon light to register on film as was the case when she was sitting still in the chair.

    O: LH2150_AUTOMATIC PLANET FINDER VENUS SUNSET
    2007 June 16
    Lick Observatory Website: Automated Planet Finder (APF)
    The newly constructed 2.4-meter APF is framed by a darkening sky, the bright planet Venus, the Lick Observatory Main Building, and the glow of city lights from Silicon Valley. Fully robotic and equipped with a high-resolution spectrograph optimized for precision Doppler measurements, it will enable off-site astronomers to detect rocky planets of Earth-size masses within our local galactic neighborhood.

    R: LH0061_KATZMAN AUTOMATIC IMAGING TELESCOPE
    2004 June 1
    Lick Observatory Website: Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT)
    Painted in the bold blue and gold of its sponsoring institution UC Berkeley, KAIT is one of the world’s most successful detectors of supernova explosions in nearby galaxies. It averages about 7 discoveries per month. It has also observed comets and the early afterglow of elusive gamma ray bursts. With a mirror 76 centimeters in diameter, this modest but highly efficient reflector is fully robotic, operated remotely from Berkeley by astronomers and student researchers. As evening approaches, automatic sensors outside KAIT’s dome determine wind and humidity levels, and open the dome slit if conditions are favorable. KAIT begins a programmed scan of the heavens, and identifies supernova candidates that the astronomers subsequently examine more closely. These data have contributed to the unexpected discovery that the expansion of our universe is currently accelerating, propelled by a mysterious “dark energy.”

    Y: LH7360_NICKEL-NIROSETI-CONJUNCTION
    2015 October 26
    Lick Observatory Website: Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector
    This early morning view through the dome slit of the Nickel 40-inch Reflector shows a conjunction of three planets framing the telescope top ring: Mars at lower left, Venus (brightest) above and right, and Jupiter above and left of Venus. Red observing lights tint the dome interior. The Nickel is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12" Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger field of view. At right in the foreground, the NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) is attached to the bottom of the round black tub. This innovative device is designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. It is the only one of its kind in the world, and the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.  What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

    BACKGROUND: LH0051_SUNSETTE
    2002 November
    This is a view of the Lick Observatory Main Building looking west at sunset from Tycho Brahe Peak. The large dome on the left houses the Lick 36” Refractor; on the right is the Anna Nickel 40” Reflector dome. 


    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    These images are a mix of scanned-digitized film and digital acquisition, using a variety of cameras and lenses. Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output. Please see individual image pages in my Lick Observatory Portfolio for additional information.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Support Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    UCO / Lick Adaptive Optics

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data US Naval Observatory

    Lightning Safety

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories / Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these photographs. 

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    Retro Lick Observatory Postcard
    1280,907
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH4025 LICK OBSERVATORY SNOW SUNSET  

     

    2008 December 17


    Although winter has not officially begun, snow on Mt. Hamilton signals its imminent arrival. The setting sun casts its last rays on the Lick Observatory Main Building before dipping behind the Santa Cruz Mountains. At far left is the Crossley Reflector; the largest dome houses the Shane 3-meter. If the dome shutters are not frozen in place, and atmospheric humidity not too high, observing will begin shortly.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200mm zoom f/3.5-5.6
    f/18
    ISO Equivalent: 125
    Exposure: 1/15 sec
    Native Resolution: 4288x2848 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    More Snow Photographs by Lick Staff

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data — US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH4025_Lick Observatory Snow Sunset
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7310_CLAIRE MAX_3M ADAPTIVE OPTICS /LASER GUIDE STAR 

     

    2015 January 5

    Read about PHOTOGRAPHING THE LASER

     

    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS / LASER GUIDE STAR • AO/LGS •ShARCS

    This image was photographed at Lick Observatory on 2015 January 5. University of California Observatories Interim Director Claire Max is inside the Shane 3m dome while the Adaptive Optics Laser Guide star is propagating.

    Note that the sky is a purple-blue color, with stars peeking through gauzy cirrus clouds. (We were fortunate the laser could propagate on this night as cloud conditions were marginal.) This phenomena is not uncommon in the Silicon Valley region. Decades ago, the city of San José installed low pressure sodium street lighting in a 'good neighbor' collaboration with nearby Lick Observatory. Overcast skies often reflect the city's characteristic saffron glow in delicate colors ranging from pink to gold. Filtered through these thin tinted clouds, the moon-brightened blue night appears purple-blue.

    https://mthamilton.ucolick.org/public/lighting/Pollution2.html

    SUMMARY: ADAPTIVE OPTICS | LASER GUIDE STAR

    Many celestial images are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that pass through as they arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 10-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding precise celestial images that rival those from space telescopes.

    SCALE

    Diameter of laser beam: 25 centimeters (~ 9.8 inches)
    Diameter of top ring of telescope: 3.6 meters (~ 11.8 feet)
    Width of dome opening ("slit"): 6.7 meters (~ 22 feet)

    NOTES

    The slit width is uniform throughout. In this photograph, the apparent spread in diameter is a function of camera position, perspective, and wide angle lens optical distortion. The laser launch tube is positioned on the south side of the telescope, with the slit and telescope oriented in an easterly direction. When seen in neutral light, the brushed aluminum dome interior is silver in color. However, in this photograph it is tinted saffron by scattered light from the laser system. The far rim of the slit opening as well as part of the dome interior and telescope structure are brightly illuminated by a brilliant moon only hours past full (99% disc illumination). The deep blue moonlit sky is subtly tinted purple by saffron-tinted low pressure sodium street lights in nearby San Jose reflecting on a guazy thin layer of high cirrus clouds.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to UCSC Astronomers Dr. Claire Max, and Dr. Shrikar Srinath (who graciously traded science time for the photo session), as well as University of California Observatories astronomers, technicians, staff, and friends. Special thanks go to Dr. Elinor Gates and the Mount Hamilton technical support staff for their generous assistance and invaluable collaboration in producing this photograph.


    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24 mm f/2.8
    15 and 30 seconds @ f/4, 14.0 mm
    ISO digital equivalent: 800
    Native Resolution: 6983x5304 pixels
    Three-frame High Dynamic Range and Panoramic Composite
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    SHOOTING NOTES

    Extreme exposure values between Dr. Max in the foreground and the dark background dome necessitated producing the laser portrait as a composite of three exposures. All frames were shot within moments of each other from the same tripod position, with the same lens and lighting. Two successive frames of the telescope and dome background were exposed for 30 seconds each with flash. One view was lower, the other higher. These frames were stitched together in post production to extend the composition vertically to allow for vertical cropping, as well as horizontal. The subject frame was exposed for 15 seconds with the same flash value, lens, and camera position. It was then layered onto the stitched background frame in post production. Corrections and selective retouching were applied to reduce, and in some places eliminate distortion caused by the wide angle lens. Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output. The composite is an accurate rendering of what I experienced in the dome that night.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    UCO / Lick Adaptive Optics

    ShARCS Instrument

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to UCSC Astronomers Claire Max and Shrinar Srinath, as well as University of California Observatories astronomers, technicians, staff, and friends. Special thanks go to Staff Astronomer Dr. Elinor Gates and the Mount Hamilton technical support staff for their generous assistance and invaluable collaboration in producing this photograph.

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolutiont.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH7310_Claire Max 3m Adaptive Optics / Laser Guide Star
    1280,972
    Price On Request
  • Lick Observatory's Close Call 

    Sky & Telescope Magazine August 2015

    Feature Article By Trudy Bell

    "In fall 2013, the University of California targeted Lick Observatory for zero funding by 2018. Last fall, that decision was reversed. What happened? And what could other endangered observatories learn from Lick's experience?"  (Quoted from Sky & Telescope. The cover is shown here by courtesy of S&T.)

     

    Images which appear in the article can be seen here. Click on "i" underneath each image for information.

     

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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH6022 MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT LASER 

     

    2008 July 21

    Read about PHOTOGRAPHING THE LASER

     

    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS / LASER GUIDE STAR • AO/LGS

    Many celestial images are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary new technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 12-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding substantially better data than would otherwise be possible. The characteristic saffron yellow of Silicon Valley's low pressure sodium lighting illuminates the background.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 17-35 mm f/2.8 wide angle zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100 / f/2.8
    Exposure: 301 seconds
    Muti-Frame High Dynamic Range Stacked Imaging

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    UCO / Lick Adaptive Optics

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images. Special thanks go to Dr. Elinor Gates and the Mount Hamilton technical support staff for their collaboration in coordinating this photograph.

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolutiont.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    Sky & Telescope Magazine Cover Feature :: August 2015
    570,716
    Price On Request

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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH6022 MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT LASER 

     

    2008 July 21

    Read about PHOTOGRAPHING THE LASER

     

    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS / LASER GUIDE STAR • AO/LGS

    Many celestial images are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary new technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 12-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding substantially better data than would otherwise be possible. The characteristic saffron yellow of Silicon Valley's low pressure sodium lighting illuminates the background.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 17-35 mm f/2.8 wide angle zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100 / f/2.8
    Exposure: 301 seconds
    Muti-Frame High Dynamic Range Stacked Imaging

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    UCO / Lick Adaptive Optics

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images. Special thanks go to Dr. Elinor Gates and the Mount Hamilton technical support staff for their collaboration in coordinating this photograph.

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolutiont.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH6022_Mount Hamilton Summit Laser
    638,960
    Price On Request

  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7304 LASER GUIDE STAR_ShARCS 

     

    2014 September 10

    Read about PHOTOGRAPHING THE LASER

     

    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS / LASER GUIDE STAR • AO/LGS •ShARCS

    This image was photographed at Lick Observatory on 2014 September 10, 23:36 PDT, in the Shane 3m dome. UC Santa Cruz Astronomer Angie Wolfgang (http://www.ucolick.org/~wolfgang/) was observing remotely from Santa Cruz. She and fellow UCSC Astronomer Rosalie McGurk contribute the following description:

    "What do lasers, telescopes, and extrasolar planets have in common? Astronomers at Lick Observatory, the world's first permanent mountain-top facility dedicated to studying the cosmos, are using a brand-new camera called ShARCS (Shane Adaptive Red Camera and Spectrometer) to observe stars that are known to host planets. These planets, discovered by NASA's Kepler Mission, have shattered astronomers' expectations for what other planetary systems should be like, as it has found a large number of planets much closer to their stars than Mercury is to our Sun. It is a challenge to explain how these planetary systems could have formed based only on our understanding of our Solar System's birth. Nevertheless, astronomers have good reason to suspect that distant massive bodies slowly revolving around these planet host stars could cause the orbits of the closer-in planets to change. If these distant bodies are other stars, then they can be detected with images that have very high spatial resolution. Unfortunately, the turbulence in Earth's atmosphere blurs images, decreasing our ability to distinguish a star and any nearby companions. The laser shown above is used to carefully measure this turbulence, by exciting high-altitude atoms in Earth's atmosphere to create an artificial star. This measurement is obtained and analyzed by the adaptive optics instrument designed with ShARCS and allows us to correct for the atmospheric blurring. Therefore, with the help of the laser, we can resolve these double-star systems in our astronomical images, helping us understand how these planets came to be the way they are."

    SUMMARY: ADAPTIVE OPTICS | LASER GUIDE STAR

    Many celestial images are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that pass through as they arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 10-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding precise celestial images that rival those from space telescopes.

    SCALE

    Diameter of laser beam: 25 centimeters (~ 9.8 inches)
    Diameter of top ring of telescope: 3.6 meters (~ 11.8 feet)
    Width of dome opening ("slit"): 6.7 meters (~ 22 feet)

    NOTES

    The width of the dome slit, or opening, is uniform throughout. In this photograph, the apparent spread in diameter is a function of camera position, perspective, and wide angle lens optical distortion. The laser launch tube is positioned on the south side of the telescope, with the slit and telescope oriented in a westerly direction. When seen in neutral light, the brushed aluminum dome interior is silver in color. However, in this photograph it is tinted saffron by scattered light from the laser system. The blue sky gradient is a function of the moon's position.


    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D800E
    Nikkor 14-24 mm f/2.8
    30 seconds @ f/2.8, 24.0 mm
    ISO digital equivalent: 800
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    UCO / Lick Adaptive Optics

    ShARCS Instrument

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to UCSC Astronomers Angie Wolfgang and Rosalie McGurk, as well as University of California Observatories astronomers, technicians, staff, and friends. Special thanks go to Staff Astronomer Dr. Elinor Gates and the Mount Hamilton technical support staff for their generous assistance and invaluable collaboration in producing this photograph.

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolutiont.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH7304_Laser Guide Star_ShARCS
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7371 LICK OBSERVATORY SUPERMOON ECLIPSE 

     

    2015 September 27

    9:18:03 PM PDT


    The camera is perched on a rocky outcrop below Lick Observatory's Main Building parapet, on the summit of Mount Hamilton. The rare 'super blood moon' has emerged from the totality stage of a lunar eclipse. A fraction of the disc remains in reddish-brown umbral shadow, and the seemingly bright region is still partially dimmed by earth's penumbral shadow. In the foreground at left, several visitors stand in silhouette near the Nickel 40" Reflector dome. Other guests are observing inside the 36" Great Lick Refractor dome on the right. The 36" dome slit is open toward the south, where sky visibility is less obscured. (Although Lick Observatory is not open to the general public at night, special visitor programs, student tours, and other evening events are frequently hosted by prior arrangement.)

    Two hours earlier, thick clouds concealed the moon in totality as it ascended above the horizon, disappointing thousands of Silicon Valley sky watchers! However, a proverbial 'silver lining' in the clouds, or in this case a very colorful one, is rewarding patient viewers. As the sky begins to clear, increasingly bright moonlight is refracted and reflected by high altitude icy clouds, creating a spectacular jewel-tone lunar halo. (Delicate yet intense halo colors have not been digitally enhanced or artificially saturated in post processing. Great care has been taken to convey colors precisely as they were observed and photographed.)

    Two brief exposures of the moon (1/500 sec) and shadow (1/60 sec) are composited with a landscape-sky frame (1 sec) to more accurately convey details observed in the moment of capture. In the landscape frame, subtle lunar features and muted umbral shadow did not survive the longer exposure. Otherwise, only minimal processing has been applied to the image.

     

     A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    This image is a composite of three exposures shot within moments of each other. Two exposures were blended to generate the moon: A 1/60 second frame for the dark umbral shadow on the moon, and a 1/500 second frame for the brighter portion of the disc. Landscape, clouds, and sky were exposed in a 1 second frame.

    Landscape and sky:
    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6
    1 second @ f4.5
    ISO: 800

    Umbral Moon Shadow (dark):
    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6
    1/60 second @ f5/0
    ISO: 800

    Penumbral Moon Shadow (bright):
    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6
    1/500 second @ f5/0
    ISO: 800

    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    2015 Sep 27-28 Lunar Eclipse Animation (time of photograph 9:18:03 PM PDT)

    University of California Observatories 

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH7371_Lick Observatory Supermoon Eclipse
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH3988 REFRACTOR CONJUNCTION: MOON, VENUS, JUPITER 

     

    2008 December 1


    In this western view from the Main Building roof, a spectacular conjunction, or clustering of celestial objects, brightens the darkening sky over Silicon Valley. Our neighboring planet Venus is centered between Jupiter on the right, and a four-day-old waxing crescent moon (16% illumination) on the left. The dark area of the moon is subtly illuminated by sunlight reflecting off the earth toward the moon; this effect is called “earthshine”. When visible, Venus is the brightest object in the twilight sky other than the moon. Similar conjunctions occur several times a year – the vigilant sky watcher will be rewarded with breathtaking celestial performances.

    HDR IMAGING (HIGH DYNAMIC RANGE)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_dynamic_range_imaging

    Because the human eye is an extraordinarily capable detector, I could simultaneously see the extremely bright moon, planets, Main Building exterior, dome interior, sky, and landscape. However, the digital camera was unable to accurately detect this broad range of exposure values in a single frame. In order to compensate for this deficiency, several frames were shot only moments apart. One brief exposure was made of the exceedingly luminous celestial objects. Longer exposures recorded the Main Building exterior, dome interior, and landscape. All frames were digitally blended in Photoshop using High Dynamic Range Imaging. The finished image faithfully transmits what I witnessed, and overcomes limitations of camera capture.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens @ f/5.6
    ISO Equivalent: 125
    Exposure: several exposures ranging from 1/125 to 30 seconds
    High Dynamic Range Stacked Imaging

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data — US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    BEGIN WebSTAT Activation Code -->
    LH3988_Refractor Conjunction
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7321_REFRACTOR CONJUNCTION 

     

    2015 June 29

    Conjunction of Jupiter (upper left) and Venus (lower right)


    With my sincere thank you to Lick Observatory staff for their invaluable collaboration in producing this photograph, special thanks go to Telescope Operators Patrick Maloney, Rod Norden, and Keith Wandry. We had fun! An unusual and unexpected juxtaposition of green dome and red telescope occurred when the telescope operator was standing out of view at the top of the pier opposite the camera, checking his cell phone. The dome was brightened to reveal its normal green color by the neutral ambient phone light. Red areas on the telescope and camera-side of the pier which were out of the phone's neutralizing range reflected the characteristic cherry-colored tint cast by red observing lamps in the dome.

    Purple sky: Sometimes the early evening / late sunset sky on Mount Hamilton is a lovely purplish-blue, and this was one of those nights. The sky and cloud colors in this photograph have not been artificially tinted or enhanced in post processing -- it really looked like this!

    The following description and comments are contributed by Rem Stone, retired UC Research Astronomer:

    "Lick Observatory's Great 36-inch Refractor was the most powerful telescope in the world when it saw first light in 1888. The long 57-foot focal length (focal ratio f19.3) was intended to make it especially suitable for visual observations of planets, a primary occupation of astronomers of the period. In 1892, E.E. Barnard used this telescope to discover Amalthea, the fifth moon of Jupiter. This was the first such discovery since Galileo observed the first four moons nearly 300 years earlier, and was the last moon discovered with the otherwise unaided eye. This impressive instrument is now used for public viewing and educational programs.

    "In the gap below the telescope and adjacent to the polar axle, note the conjunction of our two brightest planets: Venus, and Jupiter just above and to the left. Although of course still far apart in space, they appear apparently closer together along the line of sight in the sky than the diameter of the moon. Such events are not uncommon, although this occasion was particularly memorable in the early evening sky. With such bright objects in a bright sky, there would have been no reason not to have the dome lights on as shown here, even during actual observing.

    "With such a spectacular machine, it's fun to be able to enjoy it as well. Unfortunately, on this occasion we were unable to observe the conjunction with the telescope. When the very long telescope is pointed low in the sky as it is in this photograph, access to the eyepiece would be gained by raising the movable dome floor 17 feet to the height of the railed ring seen circling the dome, and movable stairs would have been required to reach the eyepiece. At present, the floor awaits engineering evaluation of the aging mechanical components before it can be returned to normal use. This is a wonderful educational and public outreach tool, and we hope it will be returned to full functionality soon!"

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their collaboration and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. Special thanks go to Telescope Operators Patrick Maloney, Rodney Norden, and Keith Wandry. We had fun! An unusual juxtaposition of green dome and red telescope occured when the telescope operator was standing out of view at the top of the pier opposite the camera, checking his cell phone. The neutral ambient phone light rendered the dome in a normal green color. Reddened areas on the telescope and pier not brightened by the phone reflect the characteristic color cast by red observing lamps in the dome.

     

    "Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the Great Telescope."
                                                 

    ~ Lick Observatory Astronomer James Edward Keeler in The Engineer, 1888 July 6

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Single Frame
    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom
    8 seconds @ f4.5
    ISO: 560
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Support Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    National Geographic_Venus Jupiter Conjunction 2015 June 30

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Telescope Operators Patrick Maloney, Rodney Norden, and Keith Wandry, as well as University of California Observatories / Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. 

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH7321_Refractor Conjunction_2015 June 29
    1280,854
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7301_FRANK DRAKE NICKEL OSETI 

     

    OSETI: OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2011 July 28

    Astronomer Frank Drake arrives for a night of observing with his collaborators at the Nickel 40" Reflector at Lick Observatory. Protruding from the bottom of the telescope is a rectangular instrument designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This instrument was replaced in March 2015 by the NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence), which was designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x, Nikkor 12-24mm f/4.0 wide angle zoomlens
    Digital ISO equivalent: 200 / f/4.0
    Exposure: .5 second
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

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    '); WS_d.write('Web Statistics and Counters'); WS_d.write('
    '); WS_didit = 1; } var WS_didit = 0; wf_rfs_get(); if (! WS_didit) wf_doit();
    LH7301_Frank Drake Nickel OSETI
    1024,732
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    2006 July 15

    PLANET HUNTER

    DR. DEBRA FISCHER WRITES:

    "This spectrum shows dark absorption lines which appear because atoms in the atmosphere of the star absorb specific wavelengths of starlight. The presence of these lines reveals the chemical makeup of the star. By measuring subpixel shifts in the positions of these lines with respect to the grid of iodine lines, astronomers can measure the velocity of a star with a precision of one meter per second (or about two miles per hour)." 

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 17-35 mm f/2.8 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/6.3
    Exposure: 1 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    LINKS:

    Exoplanets / Yale Astronomy

    University of California Observatories ~ UCO

    Lick Observatory ~ Mount Hamilton

    ____________________________________________________________________________

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH2137_Debra Fischer Cell Spectrum
    1024,680
    Price On Request
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    2007 June 15

    AUTOMATED PLANET FINDER TELESCOPE

    UCO/Lick Chief Optician Dave Hilyard inspects and cleans optics which are used in the APF Spectrograph.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/3.7
    Exposure: 2 seconds

    Multi-frame digital composite with selective retouching

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.

    The photographer thanks APF and UCO/Lick staff for their invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.


    LINKS:

    University of California Observatories ~ UCO

    Lick Observatory ~ Mount Hamilton

    ____________________________________________________________________________

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

    LH2147_Dave Hilyard Colores_APF Optics
    1024,768
    Price On Request
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    Shane 3-meter Reflector
    2006 August 9

    ABOUT THE IODINE CELL:

    Developed by Geoff Marcy and Paul Butler in collaboration with Steve Vogt, the iodine cell is a sealed glass tube filled with iodine gas, positioned in the telescope light path. It is similar in shape and size to a soda can, and is wrapped in blue insulating foam and silver foil (and of course, duct tape!). Heating wires maintain an internal temperature of 122° F.

    GEOFF MARCY CONTINUES:

    " White starlight enters the iodine cell, but emerges with thousands of specific colors (wavelengths) removed, absorbed by the iodine molecules. These thousands of discreet shades are removed predominantly from the green light, leaving the red and blue to pass through relatively unscathed. Thus the lower part of the beam, emerging from the iodine cell, appears slightly pink in color. The iodine absorption now superimposed on the incoming starlight sets the wavelength scale for the stellar spectrum, like tick marks on a ruler, allowing the Doppler shift to be measured with a precision of one meter per second."

    ABOUT THE ILLUSTRATION:
     
    This is a photo-illustration composite. An actual photograph of the iodine cell is overlaid with a digital illustration (generated in Photoshop) depicting a conical beam of starlight beam which enters the photograph at the upper right corner on its way from the telescope. The gradually narrowing beam passes through the iodine cell, then comes to a focus on the mirrored aperture plate. Most of the beam—now rendered pink/violet by its passage through the iodine gas—continues through the aperture plate into the spectrograph, but a small fraction is reflected diagonally up to a mirror on the right where it used to guide the telescope.   

    IN MORE DETAIL:

    The slowly converging white starlight beam enters the cell from above and emerges, somewhat pink in color, as it comes to a focus on the aperture plate. The majority of the light passes through one of a number of small apertures on the highly polished plate and continues its journey (unseen here) to the Hamilton Spectrograph, which is located in a large room behind this wall. The remaining fraction of light that does not enter the aperture is used to guide the giant telescope above. This diminished and subdued pink beam is then reflected at the focal point by the slightly tilted aperture plate mirror. It begins to diverge as it bounces diagonally up toward a square black-backed mirror tangent to the cell lip on the right. Although out of view in this image, the beam then passes horizontally to the right through a filter wheel and is refocused by a telescope guide camera. This camera automatically guides the telescope to keep the starlight centered upon the spectrograph aperture.

    When astronomers are observing a star, the "slit room" is completely dark and the starlight beam is invisible. (Like laser pointers, the star beam can only be seen when it is reflected by particulates in the air, such as smoke, fog, or steam.) If the iodine cell, surrounding optics, and starlight beam were visible to the human eye during routine observing, this is how they would appear. This scientifically accurate light path illustration is based on experimental test photographs made on 2006 August 9 and 13 with the telescope pointed at the bright star Vega. It was subsequently determined that generating an actual Vega light beam photograph suitable for publication is not possible due to technical limitations. However, sufficient information was derived from the test photographs and from visual assessment to create an overlay illustration that precisely describes the shape, density, color, and position of the actual light beam traveling through the cell. 

    Because this image depicts highly refined optical components and delicate starlight, only white light was used to illuminate the cell interior during the photographic exposure. No false or incorrect light colors have been artificially introduced which might mislead or generate confusion for the lay viewer who may be unfamiliar with the natural colors of focused star light as it enters and emerges from the cell. It is the objective of the photographer to remain as faithful to scientific accuracy as possible and to still produce a visual representation of an otherwise dark and invisible subject.

    This photo illustration is available with or without the starlight beam and hand size reference. It has been cropped from a slightly larger field of view, which is also available on request.

    The photographer thanks UCO / Lick Observatory astronomers and staff for their invaluable guidance, collaboration, and contributions to the production of this image series.

    Special thanks are extended to Professor Debra Fischer on whose telescope program nights the photographic experiments and sessions were performed. The success of this endeavor was in large part a function of Debra's generous and thoughtful input and participation.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    LINKS:

    California and Carnegie Planet Search ~ CCPS

    University of California Observatories ~ UCO

    Lick Observatory ~ Mount Hamilton

    WebElements.com ~ Iodine

    ____________________________________________________________________________

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    LH2162_Iodine Cell_2Starlight_Composite
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH2252_APF Steve Vogt 

     

    2009 May 29


    Principle Investigator Steve Vogt stands near the 2.4-meter primary mirror in the dome of the Automated Planet Finder Telescope at Lick Observatory. APF is fully robotic and equipped with a high-resolution spectrograph (designed by Vogt) optimized for precision Doppler measurements, and will enable off-site astronomers to detect rocky planets of Earth-size masses within our local galactic neighborhood.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 10.5 mm f/2.8 fisheye lens
    ISO digital: 125 / f/3.5
    Exposure: 1/30 second
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Dr. Vogt, and University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

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    LH2152_APF_Steve Vogt
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
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     LH2251_APF Dome Interior 

     

    2009 May 29


    The camera is positioned near the 2.4-meter primary mirror in the dome of the Automated Planet Finder Telescope at Lick Observatory. At upper right is the secondary mirror. APF is fully robotic, and equipped with a high-resolution spectrograph (designed by Steve Vogt) optimized for precision Doppler measurements. This is enabling off-site astronomers to detect rocky planets of Earth-size masses within our local galactic neighborhood. Curvature distortion in this image is a function of the 180° fisheye lens.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 10.5 mm DX f/2.8 fisheye lens
    ISO digital: 125 / f/3.5
    Exposure: 1/30 second
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output. Figures in the far lower background were digitally removed to eliminate distraction.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to APF astronomers, and University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

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    LH2151_APF-Dome Interior
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    2008 December 17

    The newly constructed 2.4-meter APF is framed by a snowy vista with the Lick Observatory Main Building seen in the distance. Fully robotic and equipped with a high-resolution spectrograph optimized for precision Doppler measurements, it will enable off-site astronomers to detect rocky planets of Earth-size masses within our local galactic neighborhood. 

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 12.0-24.0 mm f/40. wide-angle zoom lens
    ISO digital: 125  /  f/14
    Exposure: 1/640 second

    A digital perspective correction filter was subsequently applied to the image file to restore wide angle distortion to a rectillinear view.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Automated Planet Finder Telescope

    The photographer thanks UCO / Lick Observatory staff and friends for their continual and enthusiastic support.


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    CLOSE X
    LH2153_APF Snow Vista West
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    2007 June 16

    The newly constructed 2.4-meter Automated Planet Finder dome is seen in this view looking west toward the Main Building at sunset. Venus appears bright in the sky just left of the dome. Fully robotic and equipped with a high-resolution spectrograph optimized for precision Doppler measurements, the APF telescope will enable off-site astronomers to detect rocky planets of Earth-size masses within our local galactic neighborhood.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 10.5 f/2.8 fisheye lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/5.6
    Exposure: 30 seconds

    A digital perspective correction filter was subsequently applied to the image file to restore fisheye distortion to a rectillinear view.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Automated Planet Finder Telescope

    The photographer thanks UCO / Lick Observatory staff and friends for their continual and enthusiastic support.


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote
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    LH2150_APF Venus Sunset
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    2006 August 29

    AUTOMATED PLANET FINDER TELESCOPE

    This is the Automated Pumpkin Facility, on the shores of Mt. Hamilton's Blue Lagoon. Design concept by Steve Vogt with assistance from Remington Stone and Laurie Hatch. Vogt is in left vent window, Stone is in right vent window. Photo by Vogt and Hatch; composite image processing by Hatch.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100  /  f/11.0
    Exposure: 15 seconds 

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests. This image is also property of Seve Vogt.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    The photographer thanks APF and UCO/Lick staff for their invaluable assistance in producing this photograph


    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH2140_APF Alter Ego Composite
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7308 KAIT and CAL 

     

    2014 April 19


    The Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT) is flanked by enthusiastic students from Professor Alex Filippenko's Astronomy classes at UC Berkeley. (Note that many Cal Bears students are waving with curled-finger 'bear claw paws'!) Painted in Cal's bold blue and gold, KAIT is one of the world’s most successful detectors of supernovae (exploding stars) in relatively nearby galaxies, having discovered about 1000 of them. It has also observed novae, variable stars, comets, active galaxies, and the early afterglow of elusive gamma-ray bursts. With a mirror 76 centimeters in diameter, this modest but highly efficient reflector is fully robotic, and the data are examined remotely from Berkeley by astronomers and student researchers. As evening approaches, automatic sensors outside KAIT’s dome determine wind and humidity levels, and open the dome slit if conditions are favorable. KAIT begins a programmed scan of the heavens, and identifies supernova candidates that the astronomers subsequently examine more closely. These data and other Lick observations have contributed to the unexpected discovery and confirmation that the expansion of our universe is currently accelerating, propelled by a mysterious “dark energy.”

    http://astron.berkeley.edu/~bait/kait.html
    http://www.ucolick.org/public/telescopes/kait.html
    http://mthamilton.ucolick.org

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Dr. Alex Fillipenko and his UC Berkeley students, resident astronomer Dr. Elinor Gates, and University of California Observatories / Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.

     

     A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D800E
    Nikkor 14-24 mm f/2.8
    1/15 second @ f/7.1
    ISO digital equivalent: 2000
    Native Resolution: 5406x4122 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Dr. Alex Fillipenko and his UC Berkeley students, resident astronomer Dr. Elinor Gates, and University of California Observatories / Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. 



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

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    LH7308_KAIT and CAL
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7307_CAL STUDENTS HONOR JAMES LICK 

     

    2014 April 19


    Astronomy Professor Alex Filippenko (far right) and his students from the University of California, Berkeley pay their respects to James Lick. The tomb is underneath the Lick 36" Refractor observing floor, at the base of the telescope support pier. “I intend to rot like a gentleman!” Lick stated unequivocally when asked if he wished his remains to be cremated before interment in the foundation of his Great Refractor. He died quietly on October 1, 1876, after suffering a debilitating stroke three years before. He was temporarily buried at San Francisco’s Masonic Cemetery after a grand funeral parade “fit for a king” that was attended by many thousands. Over a decade later, on January 8, 1887, his body was transferred to Mt. Hamilton. Lick trustees and staff opened the coffin lid to verify that it was indeed Mr. Lick’s corpse sheltered within. Without the fanfare of his first funeral, the body of James Lick was then sealed into his unique tomb. This modest plaque identifies the Great Refractor’s dual function. For a comprehensive history of the Observatory, see the superb text "Eye on the Sky" by Osterbrock et al. 

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Dr. Alex Fillipenko and his UC Berkeley students, resident astronomer Dr. Elinor Gates, and University of California Observatories / Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.

     

     A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D800E
    Nikkor 14-24 mm f/2.8
    1/10 second @ f/2.8
    ISO digital equivalent: 1250
    Native Resolution: 6359x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Dr. Alex Fillipenko and his UC Berkeley students, resident astronomer Dr. Elinor Gates, and University of California Observatories / Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. 



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH7307_Cal Students Honor James Lick
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7361_LICK OBSERVATORY NIROSETI TEAM AND FRIENDS 

     

    2016 June 16

    From left to right at the 1 meter Nickel Reflector: Friends of NIROSETI Gary Jaffe, Bill Bloomfield, and Susan Bloomfield. To the right of the NIROSETI instrument are team members Shelley Wright, Jérome Maire, Frank Drake, and Remington Stone. Also on the team but not shown are Dan Wertheimer, Richard Treffers, and Andrew Siemion. The NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) is designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths..

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24 mm f/2.8
    Multi frame High Dynamic Range Stacked Composite:
    1/50 second @ f/8
    dual flash used on all exposures, plus interior lighting
    ISO digital equivalent: 640
    Native Resolution: 4426x6759 pixels
    Wide angle lens distortion corrections were manually applied.
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

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    LH7361_Lick Observatory NIROSETI Team And Friends
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7360_LICK OBSERVATORY NIROSETI CONJUNCTION 

     

    NIROSETI: NEAR INFRARED OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2015 October 26 Early Morning

    This early morning view through the dome slit of the Anna B. Nickel 40" Reflector shows a conjunction of three planets framing the telescope top ring: Mars at lower left, Venus (brightest) above and right, and Jupiter above and left of Venus. Red observing lights tint the dome interior. The Nickel is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12" Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger field of view. At right in the foreground, the NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) is attached to the bottom of the round black tub. This innovative device is designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. It is the only one of its kind in the world, and the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Two HDR Frames:
    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 zoom  
    ISO 200
    10 sec @ f/7.1
    5 sec @ f/11
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels

    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output. This is a composited High Definition Range exposure stack of two consecutive frames (one lighter, one darker) shot with the same camera, lens, and tripod position. Because the center areas of imagery recorded with the 14-24mm lens typically tend to be unnaturally compressed and reduced in size, while perimeter areas are elongated and stretched, the central upper ring of the telescope and surrounding sky (including planets) and slit edges were moderately adjusted and expanded with the Photoshop Liquefy command to more correctly represent the overall relative shape of the telescope and slit structure. The planets were then readjusted for roundness. Their relative positions to each other and in the sky have been accurately maintained. A digital diffusion filter technique was applied to the planets to slightly expand and soften their glow, and to fine-tune color grading. All adjustments were made in order to overcome limitations in range of exposure and distorted optics, and to more accurately convey what I viewed in the moment of capture. (www.cloudynights.com/page/articles/cat/articles/astrophotography/diffusion-filter-overlay-with-photoshop-r126).

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7360_Lick Observatory NIROSETI Conjunction
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7360vc_LICK OBSERVATORY NIROSETI CONJUNCTION 

     

    NIROSETI: NEAR INFRARED OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2015 October 26 Early Morning

    This early morning view through the dome slit of the Anna B. Nickel 40" Reflector shows a conjunction of three planets framing the telescope top ring: Mars at lower left, Venus (brightest) above and right, and Jupiter above and left of Venus. Red observing lights tint the dome interior. The Nickel is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12" Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger field of view. At right in the foreground, the NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) is attached to the bottom of the round black tub. This innovative device is designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. It is the only one of its kind in the world, and the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Two HDR Frames:
    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 zoom  
    ISO 200
    10 sec @ f/7.1
    5 sec @ f/11
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels

    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output. This is a composited High Definition Range exposure stack of two consecutive frames (one lighter, one darker) shot with the same camera, lens, and tripod position. Because the center areas of imagery recorded with the 14-24mm lens typically tend to be unnaturally compressed and reduced in size, while perimeter areas are elongated and stretched, the central upper ring of the telescope and surrounding sky (including planets) and slit edges were moderately adjusted and expanded with the Photoshop Liquefy command to more correctly represent the overall relative shape of the telescope and slit structure. The planets were then readjusted for roundness. Their relative positions to each other and in the sky have been accurately maintained. A digital diffusion filter technique was applied to the planets to slightly expand and soften their glow, and to fine-tune color grading. All adjustments were made in order to overcome limitations in range of exposure and distorted optics, and to more accurately convey what I viewed in the moment of capture. (www.cloudynights.com/page/articles/cat/articles/astrophotography/diffusion-filter-overlay-with-photoshop-r126).

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7360vc Lick Observatory NIROSETI Conjunction
    640,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7360s_LICK OBSERVATORY NIROSETI CONJUNCTION 

     

    NIROSETI: NEAR INFRARED OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2015 October 26 Early Morning

    This early morning view through the dome slit of the Anna B. Nickel 40" Reflector shows a conjunction of three planets framing the telescope top ring: Mars at lower left, Venus (brightest) above and right, and Jupiter above and left of Venus. Red observing lights tint the dome interior. The Nickel is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12" Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger field of view. At right in the foreground, the NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) is attached to the bottom of the round black tub. This innovative device is designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. It is the only one of its kind in the world, and the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Two HDR Frames:
    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 zoom  
    ISO 200
    10 sec @ f/7.1
    5 sec @ f/11
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels

    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output. This is a composited High Definition Range exposure stack of two consecutive frames (one lighter, one darker) shot with the same camera, lens, and tripod position. Because the center areas of imagery recorded with the 14-24mm lens typically tend to be unnaturally compressed and reduced in size, while perimeter areas are elongated and stretched, the central upper ring of the telescope and surrounding sky (including planets) and slit edges were moderately adjusted and expanded with the Photoshop Liquefy command to more correctly represent the overall relative shape of the telescope and slit structure. The planets were then readjusted for roundness. Their relative positions to each other and in the sky have been accurately maintained. A digital diffusion filter technique was applied to the planets to slightly expand and soften their glow, and to fine-tune color grading. All adjustments were made in order to overcome limitations in range of exposure and distorted optics, and to more accurately convey what I viewed in the moment of capture. (www.cloudynights.com/page/articles/cat/articles/astrophotography/diffusion-filter-overlay-with-photoshop-r126).

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7360s Lick Observatory NIROSETI Conjunction
    960,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7360p_LICK OBSERVATORY NIROSETI CONJUNCTION 

     

    NIROSETI: NEAR INFRARED OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2015 October 26 Early Morning

    This early morning view through the dome slit of the Anna B. Nickel 40" Reflector shows a conjunction of three planets framing the telescope top ring: Mars at lower left, Venus (brightest) above and right, and Jupiter above and left of Venus. Red observing lights tint the dome interior. The Nickel is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12" Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger field of view. At right in the foreground, the NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) is attached to the bottom of the round black tub. This innovative device is designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. It is the only one of its kind in the world, and the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Two HDR Frames:
    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 zoom  
    ISO 200
    10 sec @ f/7.1
    5 sec @ f/11
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels

    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output. This is a composited High Definition Range exposure stack of two consecutive frames (one lighter, one darker) shot with the same camera, lens, and tripod position. Because the center areas of imagery recorded with the 14-24mm lens typically tend to be unnaturally compressed and reduced in size, while perimeter areas are elongated and stretched, the central upper ring of the telescope and surrounding sky (including planets) and slit edges were moderately adjusted and expanded with the Photoshop Liquefy command to more correctly represent the overall relative shape of the telescope and slit structure. The planets were then readjusted for roundness. Their relative positions to each other and in the sky have been accurately maintained. A digital diffusion filter technique was applied to the planets to slightly expand and soften their glow, and to fine-tune color grading. All adjustments were made in order to overcome limitations in range of exposure and distorted optics, and to more accurately convey what I viewed in the moment of capture. (www.cloudynights.com/page/articles/cat/articles/astrophotography/diffusion-filter-overlay-with-photoshop-r126).

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7360p Lick Observatory NIROSETI Conjunction
    1024,379
    Price On Request

  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7317_3m-LASER GUIDE STAR_SLOANE W 

     

    2014 March 16

    Read about PHOTOGRAPHING THE LASER


    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS / LASER GUIDE STAR • AO/LGS •ShARCS

    This view shows instrumentation at the lower end of the Shane 3m telescope while the Adaptive Optics Laser Guide star is propagating. UCSC Astronomer Sloane Wiktorowicz is observing in the adajent 3m control room.

    SUMMARY: ADAPTIVE OPTICS | LASER GUIDE STAR

    Many celestial images are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that pass through as they arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 10-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding precise celestial images that rival those from space telescopes.

    SCALE

    Diameter of laser beam: 25 centimeters (~ 9.8 inches)
    Diameter of top ring of telescope: 3.6 meters (~ 11.8 feet)
    Width of dome opening ("slit"): 6.7 meters (~ 22 feet)

    NOTES

    The slit width is uniform throughout. In this photograph, the apparent spread in diameter and vertical distortion are a function of camera position, perspective, and wide angle lens optical distortion. The laser launch tube is positioned on the upper (south) side of the telescope. In neutral light, the brushed aluminum dome interior is silver in color, as seen in lower center where the dome skin is brightly illuminated by the light of a full moon. The dome interior closest to the laser is tinted saffron by scattered light.


    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D800E
    Nikkor 14-24 mm f/2.8
    30 seconds @ f/2.8, 24.0 mm
    ISO digital equivalent: 800
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    UCO / Lick Adaptive Optics

    Sloane Wiktorowicz

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to UCSC Astronomer Sloane Wiktorowicz for granting access to the dome during observations. Special thanks go to Dr. Elinor Gates and the Mount Hamilton technical support staff for their generous assistance and invaluable collaboration in producing this photograph.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolutiont.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH7317_3m-Laser Guide Star_Sloane W
    772,960
    Price On Request

  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7316 MAIN BUILDING FULL MOON HALO 

     

    2014 April 14


    Lights from a passing car paint the Lick Observatory Main Building as the full moon rises over the roofline. A gauzy layer of cirrus clouds softens the glow of the moon's distinctive 22 degree halo, which also encircles the planet Mars, just above the moon. About half an hour into the partial eclipse stage of a total lunar eclipse, the moon is still is bright enough to illuminate the deep blue sky.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D800
    Nikkor 14.0-24.0 mm f/2.8
    30 seconds @ f/4
    ISO digital equivalent: 200
    Native Resolution: 7360x4780 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data US Naval Observatory

    Moon Halo

    2014 April 15 Eclipse, NASA

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to resident astronomer Dr. Elinor Gates, and University of California Observatories / Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. 



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH7316_Main Building Full Moon Halo
    1280,831

  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH4031 SAN FRANCISCO BAY SMOKY SUNSET PANORAMA  

     

    2008 June 13

    20:16:05 PM PDT


    The setting sun is briliantly reflected in the salt ponds on South San Francisco Bay in this westerly telephoto view from Mt. Hamilton. Thick smoke from a regional forest fire dramatically reddens sky and sun.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2X
    Nikkor 200-400 f/4.0 telephoto zoom lens
    ISO digital: 125  /  f/7.1
    Exposure: 1/30 second
    Native Resolution: 4800x6000px
    Two Frame Panoramic Composite
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Support Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data — US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    BEGIN WebSTAT Activation Code -->
    LH4031_San Francisco Bay Smoky Sunset Panorama
    768,960
    Price On Request

  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH0036 RED SNOW SUNSET 

     

    2001 February 13


    Sunsets are often memorable on the summit, but this frozen landscape seems surreal. In a stunning finale to a fierce winter storm, apparent serenity belies reality as howling winds hurtle sun-reddened mists across Silicon Valley. Thirty inches of snow have fallen, and the telescope domes are immobilized by encrusted ice that will not begin to thaw until the following day. View is looking west toward the Santa Cruz Mountains from Copernicus Peak, the highest point in the Diablo Range..

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Contax 645
    45mm f/2.8 lens
    Kodak 160VC Color Negative film
    Exposure: 6 seconds @ f/8

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    More Snow Photographs by Lick Staff

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data — US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH0036_Red Snow Sunset
    1024,731
    Price On Request

  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7406c LICK OBSERVATORY PRE-SOLSTICE FULL MOONRISE 

     

    2016 June 19

    08:53:12 PM PDT


    In the evening preceding Summer Solstice, the full moon ascends behind Lick Observatory on the summit of Mount Hamilton. Line of sight distance is two miles. This full moon will achieve its maximum illumination about seven hours later, on Solstice morning June 20 PDT. (See LH7407, the full moon setting behind Lick Observatory.)

     

     A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Landscape and sky:
    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 200-400 mm f/4.0 zoom
    1/4 second @ f6.3
    ISO: 200

    Moon (same session, camera, lens, and tripod position):
    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 200-400 mm f/4.0 zoom
    1/100 second @ f6.3
    ISO: 200

    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    2015 Sep 27-28 Lunar Eclipse Animation (time of photograph 9:18:03 PM PDT)

    University of California Observatories 

    Support Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH7406c_Pre-Solstice Lick Observatory Full Moonrise
    1440,960
    Price On Request

  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7406 LICK OBSERVATORY PRE-SOLSTICE FULL MOONRISE 

     

    2016 June 19

    08:53:12 PM PDT


    In the evening preceding Summer Solstice, the full moon ascends behind Lick Observatory on the summit of Mount Hamilton. Line of sight distance is two miles. This full moon will achieve its maximum illumination about seven hours later, on Solstice morning June 20 PDT. (See LH7407, the full moon setting behind Lick Observatory.)

     

     A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Landscape and sky:
    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 200-400 mm f/4.0 zoom
    1/4 second @ f6.3
    ISO: 200

    Moon (same session, camera, lens, and tripod position):
    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 200-400 mm f/4.0 zoom
    1/100 second @ f6.3
    ISO: 200

    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    2015 Sep 27-28 Lunar Eclipse Animation (time of photograph 9:18:03 PM PDT)

    University of California Observatories 

    Support Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH7406w_Pre-Solstice Lick Observatory Full Moonrise
    1440,960
    Price On Request

  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH2255 MOUNT HAMILTON DAWN MOONSET 

     

    2008 March 22


    The first light of dawn arrives on Mt. Hamilton in this view from Kepler Peak looking west, adjacent to the dome of the Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope on the left. All domes on the summit have closed and astronomers and night techinicians are headed to their bunks for a long day's sleep. The top of the large Shane 3-meter Reflector dome at mid right issues a glowing confirmation that the sun has just crested the eastern horizon behind the camera. In the mid background, the Main Building houses the 36" Great Lick Refractor (dome at left) and the 40" Nickel Reflector (dome partially hidden behind the 3m, right). Slightly closer to the camera at mid background left is the small silver dome of the Tauchmann 22" Reflector. At mid right is the Automated Planet Finder, partially obscured by the Carnegie Double Astrograph dome. The descending full moon will soon disappear behind the Santa Cruz Mountains as sky brightens into daylight. Although reflectivity of the lunar surface is similar to that of black velvet, sunlight bounced from its dusty skin is remarkably intense, inspiring many ancient cultures to incorrectly assume that the moon was somehow ignited from within.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 125 @ f/10
    Exposure: 1/6 second
    Multiframe Digitally Composited Panorama

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data  US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

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    LH2255_Mt. Hamilton Dawn Moonset
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    APOD 2016 JUNE 23

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA
    SUMMER SOLSTICE
    2016 JUNE 20

     

     LH7407 LICK OBSERVATORY SOLSTICE DAWN FULL MOONSET  

     

    APOD: Astronomy Picture of the Day  ::  2016 June 23

     

    2016 June 20
    05:48:05 AM PDT

    Summer Solstice: The full moon descends behind Lick Observatory on the summit of Mount Hamilton at sunrise. The Belt of Venus is exceptionally vibrant on this morning due to particulates in the atmosphere. The camera is positioned on Copernicus Peak (4365 feet, 1330 meters) looking west. The shadow of the peak is preventing the sun's rays from brightening the nearby domes of the Shane 3-meter Telescope and Main Building's Great Refractor and Nickel Reflector. However, the Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope at far left is illuminated by dawn's first light. Note Mount Hamilton's subtle triangular shadow rising above the Santa Cruz Mountains in the background, slightly above the horizon to the right of center.

     A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Landscape and sky:
    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 80-400 mm f/4.5-5.6 zoom
    1/50 second @ f10
    ISO: 160

    Moon (same session, camera, lens, and tripod position):
    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 80-400 mm f/4.5-5.6 zoom
    1/100 second @ f10
    ISO: 160

    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories 

    Support Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Thank you to APOD authors & editors Robert Nemiroff (MTU) and Jerry Bonnell (UMCP) for featuring this image! Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these photographs.

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

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    LH7407_Lick Observatory Solstice Dawn Moonset
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH02250 MAIN BUILDING MOONSET 

     

    2007 July 30


    The first light of dawn arrives on Mt. Hamilton in this view looking west from Copernicus Peak, high above the fog-shrouded balley below. Telescope domes have closed and astronomers and night techinicians are headed to their bunks for a long day's sleep. The Main Building issues a glowing confirmation that the sun has just crested the eastern horizon behind the camera. The descending full moon will soon disapperar behind the Santa Cruz Moiuntains as sky brightens into daylight. Although reflectivity of the lunar surface is similar to that of black velvet, sunlight bounced from its dusty skin is remarkably intense, inspiring many ancient cultures to incorrectly assume that the moon was somehow ignited from within.

     

     A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100 / f/5.6
    Exposure: 1/200 second

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH2250_Main Building Moonset
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH0250 LICK O'LANTERN 

     

    2005 September 19


    Reminiscent of a gargantuan Halloween pumpkin, this "Lick O’Lantern" was photographed two nights after the full Harvest Moon. Disk illumination of this waning gibbous moon is 94%, with shadows of craters visible on the upper right edge, or 'limb'. The summit of Mt. Hamilton is seen through an 8” reflector telescope from a location 15.7 miles away in San José, on a compass bearing of 79°. The open dome slit of the Lick 36” Refractor and windows of the Main Building are brightly lit — an uncommon sight after dark. Also seen in silhouette against the lower left limb of the moon is the round dome of the Shane 3-meter Reflector.

    Careful calculation and planning are required to determine the precise time and coordinates from which to view this alignment. The moon rises in a different but predictable place every day.

    HDR COMPOSITE IMAGING  (HIGH DYNAMIC RANGE)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_dynamic_range_imaging


    This photo was challenging to process -- it almost didn't see the light of day (pun intended)! There were many faults in the original capture, but I was determined to try to bring the image to fruition. For starters: although I could simultaneously see both the extremely bright moon and relatively 'darker' Main Building lights when looking through the telescope, the digital camera could not accurately detect this broad range of exposure values in a single frame. In order to compensate, several frames were shot moments apart. One brief exposure was made of the moon rising behind the summit silhouette. Much longer exposures specifically recorded the Main Building lights. The latter frames were then digitally blended with the master moon/summit frame in Photoshop. Substantial corrections were also made to reduce severe CCD underexposure and other digital noise, pronounced chromatic aberration, and glare from surrounding city lights (I was not aware of the glare, but the camera's longer exposure detected it). Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output. The finished image faithfully transmits what I witnessed looking through the camera and telescope, and overcomes the significant limitations of the original camera capture.

    Some people who do not know the provenance of this photograph assume that a photograph of the moon has been "Photoshopped" behind a separate image of the Main Building and Mt. Hamilton summit silhouette — that the entire image is contrived and composited on the computer. While one could certainly do that, it personally holds no appeal as there would be no particular challenge (although it would require more Photoshop skill to do well than one might think). Of far greater satisfaction and reward are mastering the skills required to precisely calculate coordinates and photograph the moon as it rises, like an immense but benign juggernaut, behind the Mt. Hamilton summit. It is thrilling to witness this event, and it is hoped that the photograph inspires the wonder experienced in the moment.
     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Soft focus is due to atmospheric distortion (10.5 air masses) 
    Compass Bearing: 79°
    Nikon D2x
    Meade 8" Schmidt-Cassegrain Reflector Telescope
    Celestron f/6.3 Field Flattener

    Bright moon and Mt. Hamilton summit:   
        1/15 second
        ISO Digital: 100
        Exposure bias: -1

     Main Building lights:
        6 seconds
        ISO Digita: 100
        Exposure bias: -1

    High Dynamic Range Composite Imaging, see COMPOSITE notes above for detailed explanation.

    Also, see TECHNIQUE & ETHICS discussion on my website.

    PUBLICATIONS

     

    2009 October Cover Le Scienze (Italian edition of Scientific American)

    Article: http://www.lescienze.it/news/2009/10/27/news/l_universo-573014/

    This image appears courtesy of Le Scienze:

    2009Ottobre_LeScienze

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Support Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data — US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH0250 Lick O'Lantern
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH0004 SNOW VISTA 

     

    2001 February 11

    Over 30 inches of ice-crusted snow coat the landscape like thick sugar frosting, a confectioner’s fantasy. The Shane 120” dome glistens in late afternoon sunlight as storm clouds diffuse. Some snow is expected during cooler months, but this abundance is rare. The Carnegie Astrograph dome is camouflaged on the right by snow-laden trees; a silver water tank is partially visible behind. In the foreground, one might imagine peppermint sticks and gumdrops embellishing the snow-clad employee residence. View is from the Main Building looking east.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon N90s
    Nikkor 70-210mm f/4.5 zoom lens
    Kodak Supra 100 Color Negative film
    Exposure: unrecorded
    Tango Drum Scan
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    More Snow Photographs by Lick Staff

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



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    LH0004_Snow Vista
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH4026 MOUNT HAMILTON SNOW DAWN PANORAMA  

     

    2008 December 17


    Pastel colors of early dawn paint sky and snow in this 270° panoramic view of the greater San Francisco Bay Area and Santa Clara Valley, as viewed from the Main Building parapet. The Crossley Reflector dome crowns Ptolemy Peak at foreground left. At far right is a landscape viewing telescope, and dome of the 36" Great Lick Refractor. As the landscape brightens, lamps outlining the city steets will soon be turned off. The now-vintage lamps have an interesting history, the unique result of a 'good neighbor' collaboration between the city of San José and Lick Observatory, to serve their respective but disparate night sky requirements. When installed in 1980, the lamps were an upgrade in energy efficiency, which significantly reduced the city's electricity costs. For astronomers on Mt. Hamilton, the narrow Low Pressure Sodium (LPS) frequency (which shines saffron yellow), combined with overhead shielding, has allowed detection and observation of very faint stars whose delicate light would otherwise be lost in a typical city's bright glow. Many important astronomical discoveries have been made as a result, contributing to Lick Observatory's continuing stature as one of the world's forefront research institutions. Although the following webpage was written before the advent of LED street lighting and the more recent collaboration between San José and Lick Observatory to upgrade city lighting, it is an excellent in-depth examination of LPS lighting and its substantial benefits to research at Lick Observatory through the preceding decades.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 17-35mm zoom f/2.8
    f/5.6
    ISO Equivalent: 125
    Exposure: 2 seconds per frame, 11 successive frames
    Stitched 270° Panorama
    Native Resolution: 24502x2768 pixels (yes, it's very long!)
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, corrected for lens distortion, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    More Snow Photographs by Lick Staff

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data — US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH4026_Mt Hamilton Snow Dawn Panorama
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH4027 MOUNT HAMILTON SNOW CITY LIGHTS 

     

    2008 December 16


    Early dawn brightens the sky above Silicon Valley in this western view from the summit of Mt. Hamilton. Lights from the city illumiate clouds above. Why are Silicon Valley street lights yellow? City planners have collaborated with astronomers to help preserve the darkness of the night sky over San José by using low-pressure sodium lighting. Saffron in color, LPS has the least impact on astronomical observation of any type of urban lighting. The city wins too; energy costs have been significantly reduced. Overhead covers shield street lamps so they illuminate the ground where it’s needed, not the sky.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200mm zoom f/3.5-5.6
    f/5.6
    ISO Equivalent: 125
    Exposure: 121 seconds
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    More Snow Photographs by Lick Staff

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data — US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH4027_Mountt Hamilton Snow City Lights
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH4028 MT HAMILTON METEOR  

     

    2008 December 17


    The elongated streak of a vaporizing meteor sears through the pattern of star trails in this predawn five-minute time exposure. Seven of the ten summit telescopes are seen left to right: Lick 36-inch Refractor, Tauchmann 22-inch Reflector, Crocker Dome, Automated Planet Finder (APF), Carnegie Double Astrograph, Shane 3-meter Reflector, Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT).

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 17-35mm zoom f/2.8
    f/5.6
    ISO Equivalent: 125
    Exposure: 300 seconds

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    More Snow Photographs by Lick Staff

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data — US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

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    LH4028_Mt. Hamilton Meteor
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7312_LAUREN WEISS UCB APF OBSERVING

     

    2015 January 3


    From the Berkeley remote workstation (about 70 miles away from Lick Observatory on Mt. Hamilton), astronomer Lauren Weiss monitors the Automated Planet Finder (APF), a fully automated telescope that is searching for planets around the nearest stars. On her laptop, Lauren examines some preliminary data revealing planet discoveries while the APF runs. From right to left, the four workstation monitors show (1) the latest webcam view of the APF at Lick Observatory, (2) the guider image as the telescope moves from one star to the next, (3) the latest image of a spectrum from the telescope, in which is hidden the signatures of stellar motion indicative of planets, and (4) another view of the latest spectrum, along with the spectrograph controls.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24 mm f/2.8
    1/30 second @ f/6.5, 14.0 mm
    ISO digital equivalent: 1100
    Native Resolution: 4222x3405 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, corrected for lens distortion, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to UCB astronomer Lauren Weiss for her patience and good humor. We had fun on this photo shoot! 



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

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    LH7312_Lauren Weiss UCB Observing APF
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    1999

    PLANET HUNTER

    Astronomer Dr. Paul Butler in the control room of the Shane 3m Telescope at Lick Observatory.        

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon N90x
    Exposure: unrecorded

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.

    The photographer thanks Dr. Butler and UCO/Lick staff for their invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.

     


    LINKS:


    University of California Observatories ~ UCO

    Lick Observatory ~ Mount Hamilton

    ____________________________________________________________________________

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

     

    LH2138_Paul Butler 3m Portrait
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7323_REFRACTOR CONJUNCTION_wide angle view 

     

    2015 June 30


    The following description and comments are contributed by Rem Stone, retired UC Research Astronomer:

    "Lick Observatory's Great 36-inch Refractor was the most powerful telescope in the world when it saw first light in 1888. The long 57-foot focal length (focal ratio f19.3) was intended to make it especially suitable for visual observations of planets, a primary occupation of astronomers of the period. In 1892, E.E. Barnard used this telescope to discover Amalthea, the fifth moon of Jupiter. This was the first such discovery since Galileo observed the first four moons nearly 300 years earlier, and was the last moon discovered with the otherwise unaided eye. This impressive instrument is now used for public viewing and educational programs.

    "In the gap between the telescope and the polar axle, note the conjunction of our two brightest planets: Venus, and Jupiter just above and to the right. Although of course still far apart in space, they appear apparently closer together along the line of sight in the sky than the diameter of the moon. Such events are not uncommon, although this occasion was particularly memorable in the early evening sky. With such bright objects in a bright sky, there would have been no reason not to have the dome lights on as shown here, even during actual observing.

    "With such a spectacular machine, it's fun to be able to enjoy it as well. Unfortunately, on this occasion we were unable to observe the conjunction with the telescope. When the very long telescope is pointed low in the sky as it is in this photograph, access to the eyepiece would be gained by raising the movable dome floor 17 feet to the height of the railed ring seen circling the dome, and movable stairs would have been required to reach the eyepiece. At present, the floor awaits engineering evaluation of the aging mechanical components before it can be returned to normal use. This is a wonderful educational and public outreach tool, and we hope it will be returned to full functionality soon!"

    Note the sunset peek-a-boo view over South San Francisco Bay through the dome window, lower mid right.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their collaboration and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. Special thanks go to Telescope Operators Patrick Maloney, Rodney Norden, and Keith Wandry. We had fun!

     

    "Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the Great Telescope."
                                                 

    ~ Lick Observatory Astronomer James Edward Keeler in The Engineer, 1888 July 6

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Single Frame
    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 zoom
    4 seconds @ f8
    ISO digital equivalent: 200
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    National Geographic_Venus Jupiter Conjunction 2015 June 30

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Telescope Operators Patrick Maloney, Rodney Norden, and Keith Wandry, as well as University of California Observatories / Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. 



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH7323_Refractor Conjunction_2015 June 30
    1440,960
    Price On Request

  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7323_REFRACTOR CONJUNCTION_wide angle view + vignette 

     

    2015 June 30


    The following description and comments are contributed by Rem Stone, retired UC Research Astronomer:

    "Lick Observatory's Great 36-inch Refractor was the most powerful telescope in the world when it saw first light in 1888. The long 57-foot focal length (focal ratio f19.3) was intended to make it especially suitable for visual observations of planets, a primary occupation of astronomers of the period. In 1892, E.E. Barnard used this telescope to discover Amalthea, the fifth moon of Jupiter. This was the first such discovery since Galileo observed the first four moons nearly 300 years earlier, and was the last moon discovered with the otherwise unaided eye. This impressive instrument is now used for public viewing and educational programs.

    "In the gap between the telescope and the polar axle, note the conjunction of our two brightest planets: Venus, and Jupiter just above and to the right. Although of course still far apart in space, they appear apparently closer together along the line of sight in the sky than the diameter of the moon. Such events are not uncommon, although this occasion was particularly memorable in the early evening sky. With such bright objects in a bright sky, there would have been no reason not to have the dome lights on as shown here, even during actual observing.

    "With such a spectacular machine, it's fun to be able to enjoy it as well. Unfortunately, on this occasion we were unable to observe the conjunction with the telescope. When the very long telescope is pointed low in the sky as it is in this photograph, access to the eyepiece would be gained by raising the movable dome floor 17 feet to the height of the railed ring seen circling the dome, and movable stairs would have been required to reach the eyepiece. At present, the floor awaits engineering evaluation of the aging mechanical components before it can be returned to normal use. This is a wonderful educational and public outreach tool, and we hope it will be returned to full functionality soon!"

    Note the sunset peek-a-boo view over South San Francisco Bay through the dome window, lower mid right.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their collaboration and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. Special thanks go to Telescope Operators Patrick Maloney, Rodney Norden, and Keith Wandry. We had fun!

     

    "Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the Great Telescope."
                                                 

    ~ Lick Observatory Astronomer James Edward Keeler in The Engineer, 1888 July 6

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Single Frame
    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 zoom
    4 seconds @ f8
    ISO digital equivalent: 200
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    National Geographic_Venus Jupiter Conjunction 2015 June 30

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Telescope Operators Patrick Maloney, Rodney Norden, and Keith Wandry, as well as University of California Observatories / Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. 



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH7323_Refractor Conjunction_2015 June 30
    1440,960
    Price On Request

  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7323_REFRACTOR CONJUNCTION_zoom view 1 

     

    2015 June 30


    The following description and comments are contributed by Rem Stone, retired UC Research Astronomer:

    "Lick Observatory's Great 36-inch Refractor was the most powerful telescope in the world when it saw first light in 1888. The long 57-foot focal length (focal ratio f19.3) was intended to make it especially suitable for visual observations of planets, a primary occupation of astronomers of the period. In 1892, E.E. Barnard used this telescope to discover Amalthea, the fifth moon of Jupiter. This was the first such discovery since Galileo observed the first four moons nearly 300 years earlier, and was the last moon discovered with the otherwise unaided eye. This impressive instrument is now used for public viewing and educational programs.

    "In the gap between the telescope and the polar axle, note the conjunction of our two brightest planets: Venus, and Jupiter just above and to the right. Although of course still far apart in space, they appear apparently closer together along the line of sight in the sky than the diameter of the moon. Such events are not uncommon, although this occasion was particularly memorable in the early evening sky. With such bright objects in a bright sky, there would have been no reason not to have the dome lights on as shown here, even during actual observing.

    "With such a spectacular machine, it's fun to be able to enjoy it as well. Unfortunately, on this occasion we were unable to observe the conjunction with the telescope. When the very long telescope is pointed low in the sky as it is in this photograph, access to the eyepiece would be gained by raising the movable dome floor 17 feet to the height of the railed ring seen circling the dome, and movable stairs would have been required to reach the eyepiece. At present, the floor awaits engineering evaluation of the aging mechanical components before it can be returned to normal use. This is a wonderful educational and public outreach tool, and we hope it will be returned to full functionality soon!"

    Note the sunset peek-a-boo view over South San Francisco Bay through the dome window, lower mid right.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their collaboration and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. Special thanks go to Telescope Operators Patrick Maloney, Rodney Norden, and Keith Wandry. We had fun!

     

    "Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the Great Telescope."

    ~ Lick Observatory Astronomer James Edward Keeler in The Engineer, 1888 July 6

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Single Frame
    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 zoom
    4 seconds @ f8
    ISO digital equivalent: 200
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    National Geographic_Venus Jupiter Conjunction 2015 June 30

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Telescope Operators Patrick Maloney, Rodney Norden, and Keith Wandry, as well as University of California Observatories / Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. 



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH7323_Refractor Conjunction_2015 June 30
    1440,960
    Price On Request

  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7323_REFRACTOR CONJUNCTION_zoom view 2  

     

    2015 June 30


    The following description and comments are contributed by Rem Stone, retired UC Research Astronomer:

    "Lick Observatory's Great 36-inch Refractor was the most powerful telescope in the world when it saw first light in 1888. The long 57-foot focal length (focal ratio f19.3) was intended to make it especially suitable for visual observations of planets, a primary occupation of astronomers of the period. In 1892, E.E. Barnard used this telescope to discover Amalthea, the fifth moon of Jupiter. This was the first such discovery since Galileo observed the first four moons nearly 300 years earlier, and was the last moon discovered with the otherwise unaided eye. This impressive instrument is now used for public viewing and educational programs.

    "In the gap between the telescope and the polar axle, note the conjunction of our two brightest planets: Venus, and Jupiter just above and to the right. Although of course still far apart in space, they appear apparently closer together along the line of sight in the sky than the diameter of the moon. Such events are not uncommon, although this occasion was particularly memorable in the early evening sky. With such bright objects in a bright sky, there would have been no reason not to have the dome lights on as shown here, even during actual observing.

    "With such a spectacular machine, it's fun to be able to enjoy it as well. Unfortunately, on this occasion we were unable to observe the conjunction with the telescope. When the very long telescope is pointed low in the sky as it is in this photograph, access to the eyepiece would be gained by raising the movable dome floor 17 feet to the height of the railed ring seen circling the dome, and movable stairs would have been required to reach the eyepiece. At present, the floor awaits engineering evaluation of the aging mechanical components before it can be returned to normal use. This is a wonderful educational and public outreach tool, and we hope it will be returned to full functionality soon!"

    In wider angle views of this image, a sunset peek-a-boo view over South San Francisco Bay can be seen through the dome window, lower mid right. The window is not visible in this close up view.Sincere gratitude is extended to Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their collaboration and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. Special thanks go to Telescope Operators Patrick Maloney, Rodney Norden, and Keith Wandry. We had fun!

     

    "Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the Great Telescope."

    ~ Lick Observatory Astronomer James Edward Keeler in The Engineer, 1888 July 6

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Single Frame
    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 zoom
    4 seconds @ f8
    ISO digital equivalent: 200
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    National Geographic_Venus Jupiter Conjunction 2015 June 30

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Telescope Operators Patrick Maloney, Rodney Norden, and Keith Wandry, as well as University of California Observatories / Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. 



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH7323_Refractor Conjunction_2015 June 30
    1440,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH0002 LICK OBSERVATORY LIGHTNING 

     

    1999 September 8

    In this one-minute time exposure looking west from Kepler Peak, a turbulent cloud hurtles lightning into Mt. Hamilton foothills. Across Silicon Valley, more bolts shock the Santa Cruz Mountains twenty miles away. Thunder rumbles across hillsides announcing repeated strikes. Sheets of rain drench valley neighborhoods. It is a spectacle of rare intensity on Mt. Hamilton, and one that will continue past daybreak. Domes remain closed for the duration of the storm, shielding telescopes from the assault.

    PERSONAL NOTES

    On the evening of September 8, 1999, a massive storm system engulfed the greater San Francisco Bay Area. My astronomer husband Rem Stone and I watched from the southern window of our home on the summit of Mt. Hamilton as a behemoth fast-moving cell advanced north like a juggernaut toward San José. Clusters of lightning pulsed from its dark belly. We grabbed my camera gear and raced to a windy vantage point on Kepler Peak. I began to shoot one minute exposures of the Observatory as the giant cell approached Mt. Hamilton’s foothills ten miles west of the summit. In every direction as far as we could see, storm clouds spiked jagged bolts and sheets of rain into cities and bordering hills. For nearly two hours I continued to shoot while ‘safety officer’ Rem monitored cells which surrounded us, counting eerie interludes between flashes and thunderous explosions, and marveling as mega-amps discharged into the ground. It was like being on a surreal sci-fi movie set.

    The storm continued overnight and well past daybreak. It was the most chaotic and photogenic lightning event I experienced in eighteen years of residence at Lick Observatory.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon N90s
    Nikkor 20mm f/2.8 lens
    Kodak Supra 100 Color Negative film exposure: 1 minute @ f/8
    Tango Drum Scan
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lightning Safety

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH0002_Lick Observatory Lightning
    1024,674
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH0002 LICK OBSERVATORY LIGHTNING: GHOST IMAGE 

     

    1999 September 8

    In this one-minute time exposure looking west from Kepler Peak, a turbulent cloud hurtles lightning into Mt. Hamilton foothills. Across Silicon Valley, more bolts shock the Santa Cruz Mountains twenty miles away. Thunder rumbles across hillsides announcing repeated strikes. Sheets of rain drench valley neighborhoods. It is a spectacle of rare intensity on Mt. Hamilton, and one that will continue past daybreak. Domes remain closed for the duration of the storm, shielding telescopes from the assault.

    The apparent lightning figure which appears on the Shane dome is an optical phenomenon caused by an internal reflection in the camera. A ghost image from the section outlined just below was inverted both horizontally and vertically, as shown in the extracted example adjacent to the dome. Compare the inverted sample with the ghosted lightning figure on the dome, and note that the lightning outlines are identical. The ghost image was superimposed on the film, but is not ‘real’. Lightning appears to be striking the dome but was actually ten miles away.

    PERSONAL NOTES

    On the evening of September 8, 1999, a massive storm system engulfed the greater San Francisco Bay Area. My astronomer husband Rem Stone and I watched from the southern window of our home on the summit of Mt. Hamilton as a behemoth fast-moving cell advanced north like a juggernaut toward San José. Clusters of lightning pulsed from its dark belly. We grabbed my camera gear and raced to a windy vantage point on Kepler Peak. I began to shoot one minute exposures of the Observatory as the giant cell approached Mt. Hamilton’s foothills ten miles west of the summit. In every direction as far as we could see, storm clouds spiked jagged bolts and sheets of rain into cities and bordering hills. For nearly two hours I continued to shoot while ‘safety officer’ Rem monitored cells which surrounded us, counting eerie interludes between flashes and thunderous explosions, and marveling as mega-amps discharged into the ground. It was like being on a surreal sci-fi movie set.

    The storm continued overnight and well past daybreak. It was the most chaotic and photogenic lightning event I experienced in eighteen years of residence at Lick Observatory.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon N90s
    Nikkor 20mm f/2.8 lens
    Kodak Supra 100 Color Negative film exposure: 1 minute @ f/8
    Tango Drum Scan
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lightning Safety

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH0002_Lick Observatory Lightning: Ghost Image
    1024,674
    Price On Request

  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7303 GREAT REFRACTOR OBSERVING 

     

    2014 April 19


    Dr. Elinor Gates moves the Great Lick Refractor into the next viewing position, while students from Alex Filippenko's UC Berkeley Astronomy classes await their turn at the eyepiece.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D800E
    Nikkor 14-24 mm f/2.8
    1/15 second @ f/2.8
    ISO digital equivalent: 1600
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Panoramic Composite
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Dr. Alex Fillipenko and his UC Berkeley students, resident astronomer Dr. Elinor Gates, and University of California Observatories / Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. 



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH7303_Great Refractor Observing
    1080,721
    Price On Request

  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH4028 MAIN BUILDING GEMINIDS  

     

    2014 December 13

    8:00:45 PM PST


    In this view through a fisheye lens, a Geminids meteor streaks over the Main Building. Note the Pleiades above the meteor trail, and Orion rising through gauzy clouds at the roof line. Both the Main Building and clouds are tinted by saffron-colored low pressure sodium lights from the city of San José in the valley below.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    This image is a High Dynamic Range composite of three frames from one photo session, using the same camera, lens, and tripod position. My objective in shooting and processing this composite was to maximize capabilities of the camera CCD and fisheye lens, and to avoid their respective weaknesses in capturing a wide range of light values. The goal was to more authentically convey what I witnessed in the moment of capture.

    Sky and Meteor
    Nikon D800E
    Nikkor 16mm fisheye f/2.8
    15 seconds @ f2.8
    ISO digital equivalent: 800

    Main Building
    Nikon D800E
    Nikkor 16mm fisheye f/2.8
    120 seconds @ f/8
    ISO digital equivalent: 400

    Maing Building Entry
    Nikon D800E
    Nikkor 16mm fisheye f/2.8
    60 seconds @ f/8
    ISO digital equivalent: 400

    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data — US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    BEGIN WebSTAT Activation Code -->
    LH7319_Main Building Geminids
    1280,864
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     LH7353_LICK NIROSETI FIRST LIGHT NIGHT 

     

    NIROSETI: NEAR INFRARED OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2015 March 15

    The NIROSETI (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) instrument saw first light on the Nickel 1-meter Telescope shortly before this photograph was made. The Nickel is housed inside the Main Building's near foreground dome. NIROSETI team members are counting their 'lucky stars' that clouds did not prevent star light from reaching the instrument. Enjoying a celebratory walk under the night sky, astronomer Shelley Wright pauses in view of the camera. Wright's image is ghosted because she was stationary for only a brief moment during the camera's longer time exposure. Inside the dome, Jérome Maire, Patrick Dorval, and Remington Stone continue to test the instrument, albeit through changing clouds. Other team members include Frank Drake, Geoffrey Marcy, Andrew Siemion, Richard Treffers, and Dan Wertheimer. The NIROSETI instrument is designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    Saffron colored low pressure sodium street lamps in nearby San José tint the clouds a soft orange-pink.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24 mm f/2.8
    Exposure: 30 seconds f/2.8
    ISO digital equivalent: 400
    Native Resolution: 7323x6313 pixels
    Two-frame Composited Panorama
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



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    LH7353_Lick NIROSETI First Light Night
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     LH7306 REFRACTOR TWILIGHT OBSERVING 

     

    2014 April 19


    As darkness approaches, Dr. Alex Filippenko's UC Berkeley Astronomy students begin observations at the Great Lick 36" Refractor.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D800E
    Nikkor 14-24 mm f/2.8
    1/15 second @ f/7.1
    ISO digital equivalent: 6400
    Native Resolution: 7360x5220 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Dr. Alex Fillipenko and his UC Berkeley students, resident astronomer Dr. Elinor Gates, and University of California Observatories / Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. 



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

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    LH7306_Refractor Twilight Observing
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     LH0021_GREAT LICK REFRACTOR 

     

    2001 April 8


    Considered to be an irreplaceable national astronomical treasure, the Lick 36” Refractor saw first light in 1888. At that time it was the most powerful telescope on earth. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. For over a century many significant discoveries were made, such as that of the fifth moon of Jupiter in 1892. In late summer of 2003, and again in fall of 2005, the close approach of Mars was studied and recorded. This impressive instrument is frequently used for public viewing and educational programs.

    As twilight approaches, bright daytime sky reflections on the telescope gradually transform with the darkening sky into deep, intensely saturated blues. To ensure precise focus from foreground to background, an aperture of f/45 on 100 ISO film necessitated an exceptionally long, unenhanced 25-minute time exposure. Recorded here is the elusive transition when stars begin to appear, yet the ultramarine sky and its brilliant reflections have not fully given way to darkness. A bank of photographic lights illuminate subtle details of telescope, pier, and dome, features otherwise not easily discerned as the muted interior eases into night. An additional 30-second exposure of the sky was also shot and then digitally composited in the original photograph to more accurately represent the stars as perceived by the human eye. Polaris (North Star) is visible in the dome slit just above the telescope.

    A 5’x7’ photomural version of this image is installed in the Explore the Universe Exhibition, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington D.C. It is a trompe l’oeil (fool the eye) backdrop on which the famous 1894 Brashear “Mills Spectrograph” is displayed. (The instrument is not shown here.) My assistants and I thank NASM for their initiation and support of this endeavor. A percentage of proceeds from sales of this picture will be dedicated to preservation of the Great Refractor and to enrichment of visitor programs.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Sinar p2 4x5, Sinaro 135mm f/5.6 S lens
    Kodak VC T100 Color Negative film
    Exposures:
    25 minutes @ f/45, 30 seconds @ f/5.6
    Digital drum scans from the original film frames were composited and corrected in Photoshop
    Photography assisted by Steve Lawrence and Anthony Marino

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    NASM Explore the Universe Exhibition

    Support Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Lick Observatory Summer Series

    Two Weeks On Mars

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, Steve Lawrence, Anthony Marino, and University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

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    LH0021_Great Lick Refractor
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     LH7352_LICK NIROSETI COMPUTER ROOM 

     

    NIROSETI: NEAR INFRARED OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2015 March 14

    In the Nickel 1 meter telescope control room, astronomers Shelley Wright (lower right), Patrick Dorval (left) and Jérome Maire (center) are shown with computers and other electronic components of the NIROSETI (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) instrument. Coupled with the detector mounted on the telescope a few meters from the control room, this instrument is designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative system is the only one of its kind in the world, the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    Other team members include Frank Drake, Geoffrey Marcy, Andrew Siemion, Remington Stone, Richard Treffers, and Dan Wertheimer.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 35 mm f/2.8
    Exposure: 1/30 second f/10
    Camera mount bounce flash, plus interior lighting
    ISO digital equivalent: 2200
    Native Resolution: 4912x7360 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



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    LH7352_Lick NIROSETI Computer Room
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     LH7351_LICK NIROSETI WRIGHT DICHROIC 

     

    NIROSETI: NEAR INFRARED OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2015 March 14

    At the Nickel 1 meter telescope, astronomer Shelley Wright discusses the dichroic filter with her colleague Jérome Maire (only his hand is visible). Her right hand is holding a fiber that emits infrared light for calibration of the detectors. The NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) is designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, and the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    Other team members include Patrick Dorval, Frank Drake, Geoffrey Marcy, Andrew Siemion, Remington Stone, Richard Treffers, and Dan Wertheimer.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 35 mm f/2.8
    Exposure: 1/45 second f/5.6
    Camera mount bounce flash, plus interior lighting
    ISO digital equivalent: 9000
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



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    LH7351_Lick NIROSETI Wright Dichroic
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     OSETI VIDEO CONFERENCE 

     

    OSETI: OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2011 July 28

    Astronomer and Lick OSETI Principal Investigator Shelley Wright is flanked by collaborators Remington Stone (left) and Frank Drake (right). They are in the control room of the Nickel 40" Reflector, and in the midst of a video conference with Geoffrey Marcy at UC Berkeley. (Note that Dr. Drake has arrived with provisions for the night's observing: a bag of home-baked chocolate chip cookies, and almost enough m&m's for everyone.) Mounted on the telescope is an instrument designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This instrument was replaced in March 2015 by the NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence), which was designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress (shown in the framed photograph on the desk) whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x

    Nikkor 12-24mm f/4.0 wide angle zoomlens
    Digital ISO equivalent: 200 / f/4.0
    Exposure: 1/13 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



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    OSETI_Vid Con
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     LH0007_NICKEL OSETI 

     

    OSETI: OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2002

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture. Protruding from the bottom of the telescope is a rectangular instrument designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This instrument was replaced in March 2015 by the NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence), which was designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon N90s, Nikkor 22mm f/2.8 lens
    Fuji Supra 100 Color Negative film
    Exposure: unrecorded

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



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    LH0007_Nickel OSETI
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     LH7351_LICK NIROSETI FIRST LIGHT TEAM

     

    NIROSETI: NEAR INFRARED OPTICAL SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

    2015 March 12

    From left to right at the 1 meter Nickel Reflector: Remington Stone, Dan Wertheimer, NIROSETI instrument, Jérome Maire, Shelley Wright, Patrick Dorval, and Richard Treffers. Also on the team but not shown here are Frank Drake, Geoffrey Marcy, and Andrew Siemion. The NIROSETI instrument (Near Infrared Optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) is designed to detect as-yet-undiscovered nanosecond laser pulses from beyond our solar system. This innovative device is the only one of its kind in the world, the first capable of detecting such brief bursts at near infrared wavelengths.

    The Anna B. Nickel 40-inch Reflector is named for the San Francisco seamstress whose generous and unexpected bequest provided funding to design and build this telescope. Constructed in-house in the late 1970’s, the Nickel presently occupies the first dome to be completed on Mt. Hamilton, at the north end of the Main Building. The dome originally housed a 12” Alvan Clark Refractor which was placed in service in 1881. Careful dome modifications accommodate the Nickel’s larger aperture.

    What would Anna think if her telescope was the first to discover ET?

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24 mm f/2.8
    Four frame High Dynamic Range Stacked Composite:
    1/45 second @ f/4.8, ISO 1600
    2 seconds @ f/9.5, ISO 140
    15 seconds @ f/9.5, ISO 140
    14.0 mm all exposures
    dual flash used on all exposures, plus interior lighting
    ISO digital equivalent: 1600 and 140
    Native Resolution: 4426x6759 pixels
    Wide angle lens distortion corrections were manually applied.
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to the NIROSETI Team, and to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



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    LH7350_Lick NIROSETI First Light Team
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     LH7311_CLAIRE MAX_OBSERVERS 3M CONTROL ROOM 

     

    2015 January 6

    Read about PHOTOGRAPHING THE LASER


    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS / LASER GUIDE STAR • AO/LGS •ShARCS

    This photograph was made at Lick Observatory on 2015 January 6 at 1:15 AM. University of California Observatories Interim Director Claire Max (left) is discussing the night's program with fellow astronomers Lauren Schatz (middle) and Srikar Srinath (right). They are using the Shane Adaptive Optics Laser Guide Star system on the telescope. Shrikar says, "We were working on Schatz' senior thesis, and observing star clusters (NGC 2419 among them) to help characterize how well the new Shane AO adaptive optics system on the Shane telescope is doing." This is the first of a two night observing run, and they've already had a long day, preparing for the run and traveling to Mt. Hamilton. If all goes well with the weather and equipment, they have many more hours ahead of them on this long winter's night. The reward is acquiring critical data for their research, and to test the new system.


    SUMMARY: ADAPTIVE OPTICS | LASER GUIDE STAR

    Many celestial images are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that pass through as they arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 10-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding precise celestial images that rival those from space telescopes.

    NOTES

    Sincere gratitude is extended to UCSC Astronomers Dr. Claire Max, Shrikar Srinath, and Lauren Statz, as well as University of California Observatories astronomers, technicians, staff, and friends. Special thanks go to Dr. Elinor Gates and the Mount Hamilton technical support staff for their generous assistance and invaluable collaboration in producing Lick Observatory photographs.


    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24 mm f/2.8
    1/30 second @ f/4, 19.0 mm
    ISO digital equivalent: 3200
    Native Resolution: 5130x3326 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, corrected for lens distortion, and sharpened for digital output

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    UCO / Lick Adaptive Optics

    ShARCS Instrument

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to UCSC Astronomers Claire Max, Shrinar Srinath, and Lauren Schatz, as well as University of California Observatories astronomers, technicians, staff, and friends. Special thanks go to Staff Astronomer Dr. Elinor Gates and the Mount Hamilton technical support staff for their generous assistance and invaluable collaboration in producing Lick Observatory photographs.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolutiont.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH7311_Claire Max Observers 3m Control Room
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     LH7305_ROCKOSI-KUPKE_SHANE AO 

     

    2014 April 12

    Read about PHOTOGRAPHING THE LASER


    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS / LASER GUIDE STAR • AO/LGS •ShARCS

    This image was photographed at Lick Observatory inside the Shane 3m control Room. Pictured are UC Santa Cruz Associate Professor of Astronomy Connie Rockosi (http://www.ucolick.org/~crockosi/), left, and UCSC Project Scientist Renate Kupke, right (http://www.astro.ucsc.edu/about_department/people/singleton.php?&singleton=true&cruz_id=rkupke).

    Dr. Kupke contributes the following description:

    "In April, 2014 a powerful new instrument, ShaneAO, was commissioned on the 3-meter telescope at Lick Observatory. ShaneAO, coupled with a new crystal fiber-based laser guide star (to be deployed in early 2015) represents a significant advance in adaptive optics capabilities for Lick Observatory. It utilizes a high-order, high-bandwidth 'wavefront sensor' to measure the distortions caused by the Earth’s atmosphere, and two 'deformable' mirrors to optimally compensate for the distortion. The system produces sharp, clear images that rival those of a space-based telescope, at shorter wavelengths than previously possible."

    SUMMARY: ADAPTIVE OPTICS | LASER GUIDE STAR

    Many celestial images are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that pass through as they arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 10-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding precise celestial images that rival those from space telescopes.


    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D800E
    Nikkor 28-300 f/3.5-5.6
    1/60 second @ f/5 24.0 mm
    ISO digital equivalent: 1250
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.
    This is a depth of field composite of two successively shot images at different focus points, to ensure precise focus on both individuals.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    UCO / Lick Adaptive Optics

    ShARCS Instrument

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to UCSC Astronomers Connie Rockosi and Renate Kupke, as well as University of California Observatories astronomers, technicians, staff, and friends. Special thanks go to Staff Astronomer Dr. Elinor Gates and the Mount Hamilton technical support staff for their generous assistance and invaluable collaboration in producing this photograph.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolutiont.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

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    LH7305_Rockosi-Kupke_ShaneAO
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    2006 July 27

    AUTOMATED PLANET FINDER TELESCOPE

    Planet hunter Geoff Marcy anxiously awaits completion of the 2.4-meter Automatic Planet Finder telescope at Lick Observatory. The anticipated performance of this dedicated and robotic facility may enable discovery of other earth-like planets.  

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 12-24 mm f/4.0 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 100 / f/5.6
    Exposure: 1/125 second

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.

    The photographer thanks Dr. Marcy and UCO/Lick staff for their invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.


    LINKS:


    University of California Observatories ~ UCO

    Lick Observatory ~ Mount Hamilton

    ____________________________________________________________________________

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    LH2113_APF Geoffrey Marcy
    614,960
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH0255p TWIN GATES MOON 

     

    2006 February 11


    The moon rises behind the Main Building on the summit of Mt. Hamilton just before sunset. The disc is 99% illuminated—a waxing gibbous moon. This juxtaposition is not a fortuitous “accident”; the moon appears in a different but predictable location every day. Careful calculation and planning are required to determine the precise time and place from which to view such an alignment. This camera position is 2.3 line-of-sight miles from the observatory, several hundred feet up the hill from the Twin Gates Trail Head parking lot on Highway 130. The compass bearing (azimuth) is 70°. A digital camera with 400mm telephoto lens was used to record the breathtaking event.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Compass Bearing: 70°
    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 200mm-400mm f/4.0 zoom @ f/8
    1/100 second
    ISO digital equivalent: 100

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data — US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH0255p_Twin Gates Moon
    1024,457
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  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH0255c TWIN GATES MOON 

     

    2006 February 11


    The moon rises behind the Main Building on the summit of Mt. Hamilton just before sunset. The disc is 99% illuminated—a waxing gibbous moon. This juxtaposition is not a fortuitous “accident”; the moon appears in a different but predictable location every day. Careful calculation and planning are required to determine the precise time and place from which to view such an alignment. This camera position is 2.3 line-of-sight miles from the observatory, several hundred feet up the hill from the Twin Gates Trail Head parking lot on Highway 130. The compass bearing (azimuth) is 70°. A digital camera with 400mm telephoto lens was used to record the breathtaking event.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Compass Bearing: 70°
    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 200mm-400mm f/4.0 zoom @ f/8
    1/100 second
    ISO digital equivalent: 100

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data — US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH0255c_Twin Gates Moon
    1024,768
    Price On Request

  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH0254p TWIN GATES JET MOONRISE 

     

    2006 December 3


    The moon rises behind the Main Building on the summit of Mt. Hamilton just before sunset. The disc is 99% illuminated—a waxing gibbous moon. This juxtaposition is not a fortuitous “accident”; the moon appears in a different but predictable location every day. Careful calculation and planning are required to determine the precise time and place from which to view such an alignment. This camera position is 2.3 line-of-sight miles from the observatory, near the Twin Gates trail head on Highway 130. A digital camera with 400mm telephoto lens was used to record the breathtaking event.

     

    Careful calculation and planning are required to determine the precise time and coordinates from which to view this alignment. The moon rises in a different but predictable place every day.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 200mm-400mm f/4.0 zoom @ f/5.6
    1/400 second
    ISO digital equivalent: 125

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH0254p_Twin Gates Jet Moonrise
    1024,497
    Price On Request

  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH0254c TWIN GATES JET MOONRISE 

     

    2006 December 3


    The moon rises behind the Main Building on the summit of Mt. Hamilton just before sunset. The disc is 99% illuminated—a waxing gibbous moon. This juxtaposition is not a fortuitous “accident”; the moon appears in a different but predictable location every day. Careful calculation and planning are required to determine the precise time and place from which to view such an alignment. This camera position is 2.3 line-of-sight miles from the observatory, near the Twin Gates trail head on Highway 130. A digital camera with 400mm telephoto lens was used to record the breathtaking event.

     

    Careful calculation and planning are required to determine the precise time and coordinates from which to view this alignment. The moon rises in a different but predictable place every day.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 200mm-400mm f/4.0 zoom @ f/5.6
    1/400 second
    ISO digital equivalent: 125

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH0254c_Twin Gates Jet Moonrise
    1024,699
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

     

    LH0003 GOLD SNOW SUNSET

     

    2001 February 12

    The evening sun sets storm clouds ablaze after a week’s winter gale, reflected on the Main Building and on the dome of the Lick 36” Refractor. Harsh winds have driven a 30-inch blanket of snow into panoramas of sculpted, ice-encrusted drifts. Mt. Hamilton’s youngest residents have been sledding all day, but astronomers are less enthusiastic. Domes are frozen shut, preventing any possibility of observation if the sky clears. Occasional snowfalls are routine from late fall through spring, but accumulations like this typically occur only once in a decade.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon N90s
    Sigma 15mm f/4.5 Semi-Fisheye lens
    Kodak Supra 100 Color Negative film
    Exposure: unrecorded

    A digital perspective correction filter was subsequently applied to the image file to restore fisheye distortion to a rectillinear view. The results were imperfect, and localized retouching was also used to complete the process. These adjustments were made prior to the advent of sophisticated digital global correction tools, so it was a much more time consuming and laborious process than in contemporary times. Also, this image was made early in my career as a photographer, when my processing skills were exceedingly modest at best -- I chose the long-and-wrong way to do things more often than not! A learning process, it was.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    More Snow Photographs by Lick Staff

    The photographer thanks UCO / Lick Observatory staff and friends for their continual and enthusiastic support.


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote
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    LH0003_Gold Snow Sunset
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH0307 MAIN BUILDING SNOW 

     

    2006 February 19


    President’s Day Weekend: From Copernicus Peak looking southwest 25 minutes before sunrise, the saffron-colored street lights of south Silicon Valley glow curiously pink through the fog. Small cumulus clouds scattered along the horizon reflect the approaching light of dawn. Coyotes bark and sing in the canyons below, piercing the frosty silence. Seven of the Observatory’s ten telescopes are visible from left to right: Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope, Crossley 36” Reflector, Shane 120” Reflector, Tauchmann 22” Reflector, Crocker Dome (partially hidden in shrubs), and the Main Building with Lick 36” Refractor on the left, and Nickel 40” Reflector on the right.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 200-400 mm f/4.0 zoom lens
    ISO Digital: 100
    Exposure: 1/125 second @ f/8

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    More Snow Photographs by Lick Staff

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data — US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH0307_Main Building Snow
    1024,768
    Price On Request

  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH0315 PREDAWN SNOW 

     

    2006 February 19


    President’s Day Weekend: From Copernicus Peak looking southwest 25 minutes before sunrise, the saffron-colored street lights of south Silicon Valley glow curiously pink through the fog. Small cumulous clouds scattered along the horizon reflect the approaching light of dawn. Coyotes bark and sing in the canyons below, piercing the frosty silence. Seven of the Observatory’s ten telescopes are visible from left to right: Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope, Crossley 36” Reflector, Shane 120” Reflector, Tauchmann 22” Reflector, Crocker Dome (partially hidden in shrubs), and the Main Building with Lick 36” Refractor on the left, and Nickel 40” Reflector on the right.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 60 mm f/2.8 zoom lens @ f/8
    ISO Equivalent: 100
    Exposure: 4 seconds

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    More Snow Photographs by Lick Staff

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data — US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH0315_PreDawn Snow
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH0067 PINK SNOW DAWN  

     

    2001 February


    The delicate first blush of dawn arrives on Mt. Hamilton. View is looking west toward the Santa Cruz Mountains from Copernicus Peak, the highest point in the Diablo Range.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon N90s

    Stitched Multi-Frame Panorama

    Exposure Unrecorded

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    More Snow Photographs by Lick Staff

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data — US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH0067 Pink Snow Dawn
    1280,488
    Price On Request

  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH0305 RATTLESNAKE RIDGE SNOW  

     

    2008 January 28


    Snow-frosted oaks and pines frame the dome of the Lick 36” Refractor, in this northeast view from Rattlesnake Ridge several hundreds yards away.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 17-35 mm f/2.8 wide-angle zoom lens
    ISO Equivalent: 100
    Exposure: 1/320 second @ f/14
    Exposure bias: -0.33

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    More Snow Photographs by Lick Staff

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data ? US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • ? here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.?

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    ?FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH0305_Rattlesnake Ridge Snow
    1024,768
    Price On Request

  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH4033 GOLD SUMMIT SNOW  

     

    2010 February 21


    Constructed in the 1880's and seen here just before sunrise, the iconic Main Building Visitor Center crowns the summit overlooking Silicon Valley in Northern California. Forefront research, inventive technologies, and influential discoveries continue to sustain Lick Observatory's legendary stature in its second century of operation. University of California astronomers, collaborators, and students observe both on site and remotely using control rooms established on the UC campuses.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 80-400.0 mm f/4.5-5.6
    ISO Equivalent: 160 / f/8
    Exposures: 1/50, 1/250, 1/400 second
    Multi-Exposure Digitally Stacked High Definition Range Image

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    More Snow Photographs by Lick Staff

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data — US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH4033_Gold Summit Snow
    1024,683
    Price On Request

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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH0350 PINK SUMMIT SNOW  

     

    2008 January 28


    Constructed in the 1880's and seen here in the blush of a cloudy winter sunset, the iconic Main Building Visitor Center crowns the summit overlooking Silicon Valley in Northern California. Forefront research, inventive technologies, and influential discoveries continue to sustain Lick Observatory's legendary stature in its second century of operation. University of California astronomers, collaborators, and students observe both on site and remotely using control rooms established on the UC campuses.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 200.0-400.0 mm f/4.0
    ISO Digital: 100
    Exposure: 3/10 second @ f/5.6
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Support Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    More Snow Photographs by Lick Staff

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data — US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH0350_Pink Summit Snow
    1024,740
    Price On Request

  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH0200f LASER WEST 

     

    2005 June 26

    Read about PHOTOGRAPHING THE LASER

    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS / LASER GUIDE STAR • AO/LGS


    SUMMARY: ADAPTIVE OPTICS | LASER GUIDE STAR

    Many celestial images are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that pass through as they arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 10-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding precise celestial images that rival those from space telescopes.


    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 17-35 mm f/2.8 wide angle zoom lens
    ISO Digital: 320
    Exposure: 120 seconds @ f/2.8
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    Read more about LASER GUIDE STAR: Terrestrial Photography. This is primarily a discussion about the creation of two of my 2007 Keck Observatory laser images that illustrate author Robert Irion's feature article "Homing in on Black Holes" in the 2008 April Smithsonian Magazine. Although the image on this page did not appear in the magazine, logistics of photographing the laser still apply.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Support Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    UCO / Lick Adaptive Optics

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolutiont.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH0200f_Laser West
    638,960
    Price On Request

  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH0200c LASER WEST 

     

    2005 June 26

    Read about PHOTOGRAPHING THE LASER

    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS / LASER GUIDE STAR • AO/LGS


    SUMMARY: ADAPTIVE OPTICS | LASER GUIDE STAR

    Many celestial images are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that pass through as they arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 10-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding precise celestial images that rival those from space telescopes.


    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 17-35 mm f/2.8 wide angle zoom lens
    ISO Digital: 320
    Exposure: 120 seconds @ f/2.8
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    Read more about LASER GUIDE STAR: Terrestrial Photography. This is primarily a discussion about the creation of two of my 2007 Keck Observatory laser images that illustrate author Robert Irion's feature article "Homing in on Black Holes" in the 2008 April Smithsonian Magazine. Although the image on this page did not appear in the magazine, logistics of photographing the laser still apply.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Support Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    UCO / Lick Adaptive Optics

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolutiont.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH0200c_Laser West
    1024,768
    Price On Request

  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH0034 LASER STAR TRAILS 

     

    2001 August

    Read about PHOTOGRAPHING THE LASER

     

    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS / LASER GUIDE STAR • AO/LGS

    Many celestial objects are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary new technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 12-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding substantially better data than would otherwise be possible.

    This predawn 20-minute time exposure records the blurred paths of the Shane 120" Reflector, laser, and dome as they follow an object, with a backdrop of multi-colored star trails and a streak of red blinking lights from a passing aircraft. Dark stripes in the laser "fan" record periods when the laser beam was extinguished. This happens for many reasons; protecting an overhead aircraft's pilot and passengers from highly improbable but possible eye damage is one example. They would have to stare directly into the 12-watt beam to sustain injury.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Hasselblad 503 CW
    CFE 40 f/4 lens
    E100VS Color Reversal film, scanned-digitized
    Exposure: 20 minutes @ f/8
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Support Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    UCO / Lick Adaptive Optics

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolutiont.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH0034_Laser Star Trails
    960,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

     

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    2003 Spring

    Looking west from Kepler Peak at twilight, dome lights briefly illuminate  the Lick 36” (left) and Shane 120“ (right) telescopes. Soon the lights will be extinguished, and telescopes and domes will rotate toward the first objects of the night. Observing has already begun at the Nickel 40” Reflector in the smaller dome at horizon level just left of center; its darkened slit is also facing east. Midway between the Main Building and the Shane are the Tauchmann 22” Reflector left, and Carnegie Double Astrograph right.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Pentax 67ii, 90mm f/2.8 lens
    Velvia 50 Color Reversal film, shot at 100 ISOExposure: 4 seconds @ f/8
    Tango Drum Scans
    Multiframe Digitally Composited Panorama

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatoryand City Lighting

    The photographer thanks UCO / Lick Observatory staff and friends for their continual and enthusiastic support.


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote
    PHOTO GIFTS:
    Coming soon!

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0032_Lit Slits
    1024,856
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

     

     

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    2002 November 23

     A technicolor sunset ignites fast-moving clouds over Mt. Hamilton. The winter storm season has arrived, bringing unsettled weather to the region. Astronomers arriving at the telescopes are dismayed because they had hoped for clear skies; the passing squall will thwart observations for much of the night. The Main Building is profiled in this view from Tycho Brahe Peak looking west toward the Santa Cruz Mountains. The large dome on the left houses the Lick 36” Refractor; on the right is the Anna Nickel 40” Reflector dome. San José lights are beginning to twinkle in Santa Clara Valley; Stevens Creek Boulevard is prominent on the right.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Pentax 67ii, 75mm f/2.8 lens
    Velvia 50 Color Reversal film, shot at 100 ISO
    Exposure: unrecorded

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatoryand City Lighting

    The photographer thanks UCO / Lick Observatory staff and friends for their continual and enthusiastic support.


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote
    PHOTO GIFTS:
    Coming soon!

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0016_Red Blue Dusk
    1024,768
    Price On Request

  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH0052 ORION CITY LIGHTS 

     

    2008 December 16


    Early dawn brightens the sky above Silicon Valley in this western view from the summit of Mt. Hamilton. Lights from the city illumiate clouds above. Why are Silicon Valley street lights yellow? The now-vintage lamps have an interesting history, the unique result of a 'good neighbor' collaboration between the city of San José and Lick Observatory, to serve their respective but disparate night sky requirements. When installed in 1980, the lamps were an upgrade in energy efficiency, which significantly reduced the city's electricity costs. For astronomers on Mt. Hamilton, the narrow Low Pressure Sodium (LPS) frequency (which shines yellow), combined with overhead shielding, has allowed detection and observation of very faint stars whose delicate light would otherwise be lost in a typical city's bright glow. Many important astronomical discoveries have been made as a result, contributing to Lick Observatory's continuing stature as one of the world's forefront research institutions. Although the following webpage was written before the advent of LED street lighting and the more recent collaboration between San José and Lick Observatory to upgrade city lighting, it is an excellent in-depth examination of yellow LPS lighting and its substantial benefits to research at Lick Observatory through the preceding decades. 

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Pentax 67ii, 75mm f/2.8 lens
    Velvia 50 Color Reversal film, shot at 100 ISO
    Exposure: 1 minute @ f/5.6
    Scanned and digitized image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Support Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory and City Lighting Cooperation

    San José Flips the Switch on LED Streelights_2015 Feb 11

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data — US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH0052h_Orion City Lights
    1024,768
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

     

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    2005 September 6

    In this western view from Kepler Peak, a spectacular conjunction, or clustering of celestial objects, adorns the darkening sky over Silicon Valley. Our neighboring planet Venus is upper left; the first magnitude star Spica shines faintly below. A three-day-old waxing crescent moon (10% illumination) is flanked on the upper right by the planet Jupiter. The dark area of the moon is subtly illuminated by sunlight reflecting off the earth toward the moon; this effect is called “earthshine”. Spica is 260 light years from Earth, and is one of two stars that orbit closely around each other. This pair of stars appears as one to the naked eye. When visible, Venus is the brightest object in the twilight sky other than the moon. Similar conjunctions occur several times a year – the vigilant sky watcher will be rewarded with breathtaking celestial performances.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Pentax 67ii, 90mm f/2.8 lens
    Velvia 50 Color Reversal film, shot at 100 ISO
    Exposure: 4 seconds @ f/8

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Sun / Moon Data ~ US Naval Observatory

    Sky Calendar / Ephemeri

    The photographer thanks UCO / Lick Observatory staff and friends for their continual and enthusiastic support.


    FINE ART PRINTS:
    Available now Email for size options and price quote
    PHOTO GIFTS:
    Coming soon!

    LICENSING

    email comment / inquiry

     

     

    LH0400_Conjunction
    1024,680
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  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH0013 LUNAR ECLIPSE 

     

    2003 May 15


    This three hour time exposure traces the path of the moon as it has risen into the sky during a total lunar eclipse. When the moon first became visible near the horizon after sunset, it was dimmed by the shadow of the earth. As the moon ascended, it eventually moved out of the earth's shadow and attained its full sunlight-reflected brightness in the latter half of the camera exposure. The view is from the summit of Mt. Hamilton at Lick Obesrvatory, looking southeast across Mt. Isabel to the right. Lights in the Central Valley visible in the farthest distance at lower left.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Pentax 67ii, 75mm f/2.8 lens
    Velvia 50 Color Reversal film, at 100 ISO
    ISO digital: 125  /  f/4.5
    Exposure: 180 minutes

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data — US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH0013_Lunar Eclipse
    1024,821
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  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH1917 MOUNT HAMILTON SPRING STORM  

     

    2005 March 28


    A spring storm has drenched Mt. Hamilton. As clouds begin to clear, the evening sun illuminates Lick Observatory's Main Building Visitor Center. Sprouting grass and multi-hued baby tree leaves are exceptionally colorful during this unusually wet season. Home to a broad variety of plant and animal species both common and rare, Mt. Hamilton is recognized by The Nature Conservancy as an exceptionally rich and diverse biological habitat, and is one of their designated Project Zones.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D100
    Nikkor 24-120mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 400 / f/14
    Exposure: 1/125 second

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data ? US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH1917_Mount Hamilton Spring Storm
    679,960
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH0450 MOUNT HAMILTON SKYLINE 

     

    2006 May 14


    An early 20th century travel booklet states: “It is a liberal education to visit Mt. Hamilton. The vastness of the universe, the achievements of science are sufficient to fill the heart and to occupy the mind of the most intellectual and ambitious.” Formerly known as La Sierra Ysabel, “The Ham” is now populated by ten telescopes whose ages span over 130 years. Looking east from left to right, foreground: The Main Building houses the 40“ Nickel Reflector on the left; the larger open dome of the Lick 36” Refractor is right. In the middle ground are four domes left to right (only three are readily visible): the silver Crocker dome, the large Shane 3-meter Reflector, the Carnegie Astrograph (virtually hidden), and the 2.4-meter Automated Planet Finder (APF). The dome of the 0.76-meter Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT) is in the center background.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens @ f/5.0
    ISO Equivalent: 100
    Exposure: 1/1250 second

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Support Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

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    LH0450c_Mt. Hamilton Skyline
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH0450 MOUNT HAMILTON SKYLINE 

     

    2006 May 14


    An early 20th century travel booklet states: “It is a liberal education to visit Mt. Hamilton. The vastness of the universe, the achievements of science are sufficient to fill the heart and to occupy the mind of the most intellectual and ambitious.” Formerly known as La Sierra Ysabel, “The Ham” is now populated by ten telescopes whose ages span over 130 years. Looking east from left to right, foreground: The Main Building houses the 40“ Nickel Reflector on the left; the larger open dome of the Lick 36” Refractor is right. In the middle ground are four domes left to right (only three are readily visible): the silver Crocker dome, the large Shane 3-meter Reflector, the Carnegie Astrograph (virtually hidden), and the 2.4-meter Automated Planet Finder (APF). The dome of the 0.76-meter Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT) is in the center background.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens @ f/5.0
    ISO Equivalent: 100
    Exposure: 1/1250 second

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Support Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

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    LH0450f_Mt. Hamilton Skyline
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH0001 SPRING VISTA  

     

    2003 May 19


    Observatory domes are resplendent on this unusually clear spring morning. Patches of lush grass and wildflowers carpet the rocky mountaintop; oak leaves are just beginning to sprout. Seven of the Observatory’s ten telescopes can be seen within this vista. From left to right: Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope, Crossley 36” Reflector, Shane 120" Reflector, Tauchmann 22" Reflector, Crocker Dome, and finally, the Main Building with Lick 36" Refractor on the left, and Nickel 40" Reflector on the right. View is from Copernicus Peak looking west across south San José toward the Santa Cruz Mountains.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Pentax 67ii, 75mm f/2.8 lens
    Velvia 50 Color Reversal film, Tango Drum Scans
    Exposure: 1/125 and 1/250 @ f/8
    Multi-Frame Digitally Composited Panorama

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    More Snow Photographs by Lick Staff

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data ? US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

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    LH0001_Spring Vista
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH2290 MOUNT HAMILTON RIDGE 

     

    2008 May 10


    An early 20th century travel booklet states: “It is a liberal education to visit Mt. Hamilton. The vastness of the universe, the achievements of science are sufficient to fill the heart and to occupy the mind of the most intellectual and ambitious.” Formerly known as La Sierra Ysabel, “The Ham” is now populated by ten telescopes whose ages span over 130 years. Looking east along the summit ridge, foreground: The Main Building houses the 40“ Nickel Reflector on the left; the larger open dome of the Lick 36” Refractor is right. Note the covered 36" lens through the open dome slit, and the shadow of the photography aircraft on the slope below. At middle ground right is the silver dome of the 22" Tauchmann Reflector. Farther back, the large Shane 3-meter Reflector is flanked forward left by the silver Crocker dome, and forward right by the 2.4-meter Automated Planet Finder. The Carnegie Astrograph is virtually hidden behind APF. The dome of the 0.76-meter Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope is in the far background, above and slightly left of the Shane.


     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18-200 mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens @ f/5.0
    ISO Equivalent: 100
    Exposure: 1/4000 second

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data — US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

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    LH2290_Mount Hamilton Ridge
    697,960
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    2004 June 1

    Painted in the bold blue and gold of its sponsoring institution UC Berkeley, the Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope is the world's most successful detector of supernova explosions in nearby galaxies. It averages about seven discoveries per month. It has also observed comets and the early afterglow of elusive gamma ray bursts. With a mirror 76 centimeters in diameter, this modest but highly efficient reflector is fully robotic, operated remotely from Berkeley by astronomers and student researchers. As evening approaches, automatic sensors outside KAIT's dome determine wind and humidity levels, and open the dome slit if conditions are favorable. KAIT begins a programmed scan of the heavens, and identifies supernova candidates that the astronomers subsequently examine more closely. These data have contributed to the unexpected discovery that the expansion of our universe is currently accelerating, propelled by a mysterious "dark energy."

    See the Berkeley supernova team in action at the Keck II control room in Hawai`i.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon N90s
    Nikkor 20mm f/2.8 lens
    Fuji Velvia 100 color reversal film
    Exposures: unrecorded
    Multi-Frame High Dynamic Range Imaging

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope

    The photographer thanks KAIT astronomers and UCO / Lick Observatory staff and friends for their continual and enthusiastic support.


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    LH0061_KAIT
    755,960
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH0063_KATZMAN AUTOMATIC IMAGING TELESCOPE  

     

    2004 June 1


    Painted in the bold blue and gold of its sponsoring institution UC Berkeley, the Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope is the world’s most successful detector of supernova explosions in nearby galaxies. It averages about 7 discoveries per month. It has also observed comets and the early afterglow of elusive gamma ray bursts. With a mirror 76 centimeters in diameter, this modest but highly efficient reflector is fully robotic, operated remotely from Berkeley by astronomers and student researchers. As evening approaches, automatic sensors outside KAIT’s dome determine wind and humidity levels, and open the dome slit if conditions are favorable. KAIT begins a programmed scan of the heavens, and identifies supernova candidates that the astronomers subsequently examine more closely. These data have contributed to the unexpected discovery that the expansion of our universe is currently accelerating, propelled by a mysterious “dark energy.”

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon N90s
    Nikkor 20mm f/2.8
    Fuji Velvia Color Reversal film
    Exposures: unrecorded
    Multi-Frame High Dynamic Range Imaging

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    More Snow Photographs by Lick Staff

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data ? US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

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    LH0063_Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope
    1024,661
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH7299 36" LENS CLEANING 

     

    2009 October 9


    Technicians Bob Owen (left) and Darrell Severinsen (right) carefully clean the interior surfaces of the two 36" lenses in the Great Lick Refractor.

    In 2006, UCO Lick Principal Optician David Hilyard described the 1986-1987 refiguring of the lenses:

    "On the 36" refractor; I started work on it in late 1986 and finished in 1988. I worked on this off and on during that time, with most of the work done in 1987. To start, I had made a spherical test plate to match the radius of the outer surface of the crown lens. This gave me a reference in radius and figure to work from. I first qualified the radius and figure using this 12.5" diameter test plate and found the figure irregular. The problem was that the outer region of that surface had trefoil of many waves, probably due to the support used to hold the lens during grinding and re-polishing in the early 1980's before I got here. It seemed easy enough to refigure that surface to a smooth spherical figure while maintaining the radius of curvature. My notes show that it only took 15 hours of careful polishing to restore that surface to 1/10 wave spherical, all the way to the edge. But the test of the objective in auto-collimation against a 40" flat showed spherical aberration of about 2 waves (single-pass). We didn't expect an asphere in the system, but had read that the Clarks sometimes did polish in an asphere to correct for glass inhomogeneities or lens spacing inaccuracies. It took some time to decide whether to figure that surface to an asphere to correct the test, or to do the work on another surface. After starting correction on that same surface, I think it took about 6 months before we decided it was as good as it could be and needed confirmation in the telescope. (Each polishing run, mostly corrected by hand, walking around the lens just like the Clark's did, was followed by re-assembling the objective in the cell and testing at the focus (is it 60 feet?) against the 40" flat, waiting for the glass to equilibrate and the floor to stop vibrating enough to get stable fringes.) Arnold Klemola, the most familiar with the quality of the image from the Clark's work, did the on-the-sky test in 1988. He deemed it as good or better than the original Clark lens."

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 18 mm f/2.8 Fisheye
    ISO Equivalent: 125 / f/2.8
    Exposure: 1/4 second

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data — US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

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    LH7299_36" Lens Cleaning
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH0240_SVP-Dorothy Schaumberg  

     

    2005 September 10


    As part of the Lick Observatory Summer Programs, Dorothy Schaumberg is seen speaking at the podium (far side of the group of people) on the beautiful dome floor of the Great Lick Refractor. She is entertaining visitors with the fascinating history of this historic California institution. She enjoyed doing these talks for many years, as a natural extension to her decades of service to the Mary Lea Shane Archives of Lick Observatory, located on the UCSC campus, where she served ultimately as Curator. When her talk is concluded, the chairs will be whisked away, the lights turned off, and visitors will peer through the Great Lick Refractor at the evening's pick of celestial delights.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 12-24 mm f/4.0 wide-angle zoom lens
    ISO Equivalent: 400
    Exposure: 0.4 second @ f/4.0

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    More Snow Photographs by Lick Staff

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

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    LH0240_SVP-Dorothy Schaumberg
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH0005_JAMES LICK TOMB  

     

    1999 May 8


    “I intend to rot like a gentleman!” James Lick stated unequivocally when asked if he wished his remains to be cremated before interment in the foundation of his Great Lick Refractor. After suffering a debilitating stroke three years before, he died quietly on October 1, 1876, and was temporarily buried at San Francisco’s Masonic Cemetery after a grand funeral parade “fit for a king” that was attended by many thousands. On January 8, 1887 his body was transferred to Mt. Hamilton. Lick trustees and staff opened the coffin lid to verify that it was indeed Mr. Lick’s corpse sheltered within. Without the fanfare of his first funeral, the body of James Lick was then sealed into his unique tomb at the base of the telescope pier. This modest plaque identifies the Great Refractor’s dual function. For a comprehensive history of the Observatory, see the superb text "Eye on the Sky" by Osterbrock et al.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon N90s
    Nikkor 70-210mm f/4.5 zoom lens
    Kodak Supra 100 Color Negative film
    Exposure: unrecorded

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    More Snow Photographs by Lick Staff

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

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    LH0005_James Lick Tomb
    619,960
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH0055 LICK 36" CLASSIC 

     

    2004 May 29

    Considered to be an irreplaceable national astronomical treasure, the Lick 36” Refractor saw first light in 1888. At that time it was the most powerful telescope on earth. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. For over a century many significant discoveries were made, such as that of the fifth moon of Jupiter in 1892. In late summer of 2003, and again in fall of 2005, the close approach of Mars was studied and recorded.

    The Great Refractor and dome interior are seen through the encompassing eye of a 180-degree fisheye lens, with longtime Mt. Hamilton resident and Research Astronomer Remington Stone pictured near the eyepiece. It is challenging to capture the unique ambiance inside this enormous Victorian structure. Perhaps the experience is described most eloquently by early Lick Director and accomplished astronomer James Keeler in a fascinating article written for the 1888 July 6 issue of The Engineer: “Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the great telescope.” Both dome and telescope were technological marvels in their day, and have seen many seminal discoveries. Occasionally used in its second century for research, this venerable telescope frequently inspires visiting classes and summer visitors with enchanting views of the heavens. 

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon N90s
    Nikkor 16mm f/2.8 semi-fisheye lens
    Fuji Velvia Color Reversal film
    Exposure: unrecorded.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Two Weeks On Mars

    Support Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Lick Observatory Summer Series

     

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this image.

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH0055_Lick 36" Classic
    639,960
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH0101_FULL MOON OBSERVING

     

    2003 September 10

    Considered to be an irreplaceable national astronomical treasure, the Lick 36” Refractor saw first light in 1888. At that time it was the most powerful telescope on earth. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. For over a century many significant discoveries were made, such as that of the fifth moon of Jupiter in 1892. In late summer of 2003, and again in fall of 2005, the close approach of Mars was studied and recorded. In this photograph Mars observers William Sheehan and Tony Misch are taking a break from observing the red planet and instead are viewing the full moon.

    The Great Refractor and dome interior are seen through the encompassing eye of a 180-degree fisheye lens. It is challenging to capture the unique ambiance inside this enormous Victorian structure. Perhaps the experience is described most eloquently by early Lick Director and accomplished astronomer James Keeler in a fascinating article written for the 1888 July 6 issue of The Engineer: “Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the great telescope.” Both dome and telescope were technological marvels in their day, and have seen many seminal discoveries. Occasionally used in its second century for research, this venerable telescope frequently inspires visiting classes and summer visitors with enchanting views of the heavens. 

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon N90s, Sigma 15mm
    f/2.8 semi-fisheye lens
    Provia 400 Color Reversal film
    Exposure: unrecorded, two composited frames, one shot for highlights, the other for midtones and shadows

    A digital perspective correction filter was subsequently applied to the image file to partially restore fisheye distortion to a rectilinear view.

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Two Weeks On Mars

    Support Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Lick Observatory Summer Series

     

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to William Sheehan, Tony Misch, and University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this image.

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

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    LH0101_Full Moon Observing
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH0020_REM 'n TELLY 

     

    2001 April


    Research Astronomer and long-time Mt. Hamilton resident Remington Stone cleans the Right Ascension counterweight arm of the Great Lick Refractor. Considered to be an irreplaceable national astronomical treasure, the Lick 36” Refractor saw first light in 1888. At that time it was the most powerful telescope on earth. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. For over a century many significant discoveries were made, such as that of the fifth moon of Jupiter in 1892. In late summer of 2003, and again in fall of 2005, the close approach of Mars was studied and recorded. This impressive instrument is frequently used for public viewing and educational programs.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon N90s
    Exposure: unrecorded

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data — US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote


    LH0020_Rem 'n Telly
    651,960
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH4029 RED TELLY 

     

    2008 July 12


    Dusk begins to darken the sky in this view of the telescope pier in the 36" Great Lick Refractor dome. White desk lights have been turned off, and red observing lights bathe the interior in a strange crimson glow, enhanced by a long film exposure. It is very quiet and peaceful, inviting those within the dome to leave mundane thoughts behind. Perhaps the experience is described most eloquently by early Lick Director and accomplished astronomer James Keeler in a fascinating article written for the 1888 July 6 issue of The Engineer: “Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the great telescope.”

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x, Nikkor 12-24 mm f/4 wide-angle zoom lens
    f/4.0
    ISO Equivalent: 125
    Exposure: 120 secondsd

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data — US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH4029_RedTelly
    638,960
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  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH4029 LICK REFRACTOR OBSERVING 

     

    2009 October 2


    The Lick 36” Refractor is seen through the encompassing eye of a 180-degree fisheye lens. It is
    challenging to capture the unique ambience inside this enormous Victorian structure. Perhaps the experience is described most eloquently by early Lick Director and accomplished astronomer James Keeler in a fascinating article written for the 1888 July 6 issue of The Engineer: “Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the great telescope.” Both dome and telescope were technological marvels in their day, and have seen many seminal discoveries. Occasionally used in its second century for research, this venerable telescope frequently inspires visiting classes (shown here) and summer visitors with enchanting views of the heavens.

     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 10.5 mm f/2.8 Fisheye
    ISO Equivalent: 125 / f/2.8
    Exposure: 120 seconds

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data — US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH7295_Lick Refractor Observing
    638,960
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    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA


     LH0300 36" SANTA SOX 

     

    2005 December 22


    Santa and his reindeer have made a preliminary test flight to Mt. Hamilton in anticipation of their annual World Tour on December 24. Apparently, all systems are "go" -- the stockings are filled and awaiting discovery by resident children both young and old. The Lick Great Refractor has served in this capacity in the past; a similar photograph, dated 1927, is shown in the definitive Lick history entitled "Eye on the Sky" by Osterbrock et al. That vintage photo inspired this 21st century counterpart.


     

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

     

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 12-24 mm f/4.0 wide-angle zoom lens
    ISO Equivalent: 100 @ f/16
    Exposure: 3 seconds

     

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Save Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data — US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories | Lick Observatory astronomers, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing these images.



    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  •  here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH0300_36" Santa Sox
    1024,747
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

     

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON
    CALIFORNIA

    2006 July 9

    INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
    ADAPTIVE OPTICS /
    LASER GUIDE STAR ~ AO/LGS

    Many celestial images are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth’s turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But an extraordinary new technology is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 12-watt laser beam creates a bright “artificial star“ high in the atmosphere, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance, or twinkling in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser “star” and faint target object then come into precise focus, yielding substantially better data than would otherwise be possible.

    The Shane 120" Reflector was the second largest telescope in the world when it was completed in 1959. It bears the name of former Lick Observatory director and astronomer Donald Shane, who spearheaded its development. The mirror was originally a test blank for the Palomar 200" Reflector, then the world’s largest telescope. (Pyrex glass was invented specifically for use in these mirrors.) Although the Shane is modest in size by current standards, state-of-the-art research progresses in several fields, including the Adaptive Optics and Laser Guide-Star system shown here. Using the incomparable Hamilton Spectrograph, the Shane is a leader in discovering planets orbiting nearby stars.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2x
    Nikkor 12-24 mm f/4 zoom lens
    ISO digital: 160  /  f/4.0
    Exposure: 60 seconds

    Read more about LASER GUIDE STAR: Terrestrial Photography</