• "i" is for Information :: Image Names :: Descriptions

    On the navigation bar below, click "i" to read about each portfolio when it opens, and descriptions for each image contained within. Click "i" again to close the pop up window.

    For example: Several astronomy photos feature contributions written by observers about their forefront research with the telescopes when the shutter was clicked.

    LH7419_"i" is for Information
    1440,698
    Price On Request
  • For the classic collection of Lick Observatory images, see LICK OBSERVATORY entry in the ASTRONOMY portfolio menu

    LH4033_GoldSummitSnow
    1344,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11


    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA



    LH7431 COMET NEOWISE RISING OVER LICK OBSERVATORY 


    2020 July 8

    This scene shows comet NEOWISE rising above Lick Observatory shortly before dawn.

    Domes left to right are the Automated Planet Finder (APF), the Carnegie Double Astrograph (newly refurbished and housing a PANOSETI experiment, and the Shane 3-meter. Astronomer Treu Tommaso describes his group's Shane program on this evening:

    "The observing program is aimed at measuring the mass of supermassive black holes in distant active galaxies, using a technique called 'echo mapping'. The team has been monitoring the galaxies containing the black holes for almost 5 years with the goal of measuring the delay between the emission by the hot gas immediately surrounding the black hole and the 'echo' produced by the same light as it bounces off by hydrogen a few light-months away. The program is a collaboration between the University of California, Seoul National University, and other partners."

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D850
    Nikkor 80-400mm zoom f/4.5-5.6
    2.5 seconds @ f5.0
    ISO digital equivalent: 2500
    Native Resolution: 5504x8256 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.



    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    UCLA Astronomy Professor Treu Tommaso

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory



    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS


    Email for size options and price quote


    LICENSING


    Email your inquiry / comment





    LH7431_Comet NEOWISE Rising Over Lick Observatory
    1344,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11


    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA



    LH7432 COMET NEOWISE OVER LICK OBSERVATORY 


    2020 July 8

    This scene shows comet NEOWISE rising above Lick Observatory shortly before dawn.

    Domes left to right are the Automated Planet Finder (APF), the Carnegie Double Astrograph (newly refurbished and housing a PANOSETI experiment, and the Shane 3-meter with open shutters revealing the telescope within. UCLA Astrophysics Professor Tommaso Treu describes his group's program on this evening:

    "The observing program is aimed at measuring the mass of supermassive black holes in distant active galaxies, using a technique called 'echo mapping'. The team has been monitoring the galaxies containing the black holes for almost 5 years with the goal of measuring the delay between the emission by the hot gas immediately surrounding the black hole and the 'echo' produced by the same light as it bounces off by hydrogen a few light-months away. The program is a collaboration between the University of California, Seoul National University, and other partners."

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D850
    Nikkor 80-400mm zoom f/4.5-5.6
    2 seconds @ f5.3
    ISO digital equivalent: 1000
    Native Resolution: 5504x8256 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.



    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    UCLA Astronomy Professor Treu Tommaso

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory



    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS


    Email for size options and price quote


    LICENSING


    Email your inquiry / comment





    LH7432_Comet NEOWISE Over Lick Observatory
    800,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11


    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA



    LH7431 COMET NEOWISE - ISS - BIG DIPPER OVER SAN FRANCISCO BAY 


    2020 July 16

    This scene shows comet NEOWISE setting over the horizon of north San Francisco Bay. Wildfires in the region have blanketed the area in smoke. The International Space Station (ISS) streaks across the scene, with spaces marking one-second intervals between a series of 17 six-second frames. The Big Dipper/Ursa Major constellation gleams high in the sky above.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D850
    Nikkor 24 mm f/1.4
    6 seconds @ f4.0
    17 stacked exposures to record ISS
    ISO: 2000
    Native Resolution: 5504x8256 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.



    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory



    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS


    Email for size options and price quote


    LICENSING


    Email your inquiry / comment





    LH7432_Comet NEOWISE-ISS-Big Dipper Over San Francisco Bay
    640,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7333_LICK OBSERVATORY PERSEID PIERCES THE MOON

     

    2016 August 11

    A Perseid meteor trail cooincidentally appears to be piercing the waxing crescent Moon in this view of Lick Observatory from Kepler Peak. Although the Moon appears as a bright round glow, it actually is only 35% illuminated. The dome of the Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope is in the near foreground.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 zoom lens
    20 seconds @ f2.8, 14mm
    ISO digital: 320
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7333_Lick Observatory Persied Pierces the Moon
    1378,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7420_GREAT REFRACTOR MOONRISE PANO 

     

    2009 July 6

    As the full moon rises over Mount Isabel, the Lick 36" Great Refractor is viewed on Mount Hamilton, from a camera position on the roof of the Lick Observatory Main Building entry foyer.It is challenging to capture the unique ambience inside this enormous Victorian structure. Perhaps the experience is described most eloquently by early Lick Director and accomplished astronomer James Keeler in a fascinating article written for the 1888 July 6 issue of The Engineer: "Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the great telescope." Both dome and telescope were technological marvels in their day, and have seen many seminal discoveries. Occasionally used in its second century for research, this venerable telescope frequently inspires visiting classes and summer visitors with enchanting views of the heavens..

    It is challenging to capture the unique ambience inside this enormous Victorian structure. Perhaps the experience is described most eloquently by early Lick Director and accomplished astronomer James Keeler in a fascinating article written for the 1888 July 6 issue of The Engineer: "Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the great telescope." Both dome and telescope were technological marvels in their day, and have seen many seminal discoveries. Occasionally used in its second century for research, this venerable telescope frequently inspires classes and visitor groups with enchanting views of the heavens.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their collaboration and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2X
    Nikkor 10.5mm lens
    2 seconds @ f5.0
    dual flash used on all exposures, plus interior lighting
    ISO digital equivalent: 125
    Native Resolution: 4288x2646 pixels (including black border)
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7419_Great Refractor Moonrise Pano
    1440,698
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7411_GREAT REFRACTOR VISITOR VIEW 

     

    2016 August 9

    The following description and comments are contributed by Rem Stone, retired UC Research Astronomer:

    "Lick Observatory's Great 36-inch Refractor was the most powerful telescope in the world when it saw first light in 1888. The long 57-foot focal length (focal ratio f19.3) was intended to make it especially suitable for visual observations of planets, a primary occupation of astronomers of the period. E.E. Barnard used this telescope to discover Amalthea, the fifth moon of Jupiter. This was the first such discovery since Galileo discovered the first four moons nearly 300 years earlier, and was the last moon discovered with the otherwise unaided eye. This impressive instrument is now used for public viewing and educational programs."

    It is challenging to capture the unique ambience inside this enormous Victorian structure. Perhaps the experience is described most eloquently by early Lick Director and accomplished astronomer James Keeler in a fascinating article written for the 1888 July 6 issue of The Engineer: "Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the great telescope." Both dome and telescope were technological marvels in their day, and have seen many seminal discoveries. Occasionally used in its second century for research, this venerable telescope frequently inspires classes and visitor groups with enchanting views of the heavens.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their collaboration and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 20 mm f/1.8
    30 seconds @ f16
    ISO digital equivalent: 80
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7411_Great Refractor Visitor View
    1439,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7414_36-INCH DOME IN MOTION TOP OF PIER 

     

    2015 August 26

    During this 30 second exposure as seen through a fisheye lens, the dome of the 36-Inch Great Refractor rotates toward the waiting telescope which has been positioned to view the next celestial object. The deep sky blue of early evening registers as a blur through the open slit. At lower right, the small bright oval of the crescent moon can be seen. Circular streaks of light near the left corner and bottom border reveal the paths of rotating dome lights.

    It is challenging to capture the unique ambience inside this enormous Victorian structure. Perhaps the experience is described most eloquently by early Lick Director and accomplished astronomer James Keeler in a fascinating article written for the 1888 July 6 issue of The Engineer: "Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the great telescope." Both dome and telescope were technological marvels in their day, and have seen many seminal discoveries. Occasionally used in its second century for research, this venerable telescope frequently inspires classes and visitor groups with enchanting views of the heavens.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their collaboration and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 16 mm f/2.8 fisheye
    30 seconds @ f16
    ISO digital equivalent: 100
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7414_36-Inch Dome In Motion Top of Pier
    1439,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7428_SUMMER SERIES GREAT REFRACTOR WITH PETER AND KEITH 

     

    2016 August 13

    Two telescope Operaters are rotating the Great Refractor telescope into position for viewing the next viewing celestial object. Keith is on top of the pier behind the rail with his back to the camera, turning the right ascension setting wheel, while Peter stands on the ladder reading out coordinates.

    It is challenging to capture the unique ambiance inside this enormous Victorian vault. Both dome and telescope were technological marvels when built in the late 19th century, and in succeeding decades have seen many seminal discoveries. Occasionally used in its second century for research, this telescope frequently inspires visiting classes and visitors with enchanting views of the heavens.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 20 mm f/2.8
    .6 second @ f4.5
    ISO digital: 320

    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels (including black border)
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    7428_Summer Series Great Refractor With Peter And Keith
    641,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7427_SUMMER SERIES GREAT REFRACTOR PORTRAIT 

     

    2016 August 13

    The dome interior of the Great Lick Refractor is illuminated by red observing lights, which preserve night vision acuity of observers who have become dark-adapted. The red color is more pronounced and saturated in the camera's 15-seconds time exposure than would appear to the naked eye when one is inside the dome.

    It is challenging to capture the unique ambiance inside this enormous Victorian vault. Both dome and telescope were technological marvels when built in the late 19th century, and in succeeding decades have seen many seminal discoveries. Occasionally used in its second century for research, this telescope frequently inspires visiting classes and visitors with enchanting views of the heavens.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 20 mm f/2.8
    15 seconds @ f2.8
    ISO digital: 400

    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels (including black border)
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7427_Summer Series Great Refractor Portrait
    641,960
    Price On Request

  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7321_REFRACTOR CONJUNCTION PANORAMA 

     

    2015 June 29

    Conjunction of Jupiter (upper left) and Venus (lower right)


    The following description and comments are contributed by Rem Stone, retired UC Research Astronomer:

    "Lick Observatory's Great 36-inch Refractor was the most powerful telescope in the world when it saw first light in 1888. The long 57-foot focal length (focal ratio f19.3) was intended to make it especially suitable for visual observations of planets, a primary occupation of astronomers of the period. In 1892, E.E. Barnard used this telescope to discover Amalthea, the fifth moon of Jupiter. This was the first such discovery since Galileo observed the first four moons nearly 300 years earlier, and was the last moon discovered with the otherwise unaided eye. This impressive instrument is now used for public viewing and educational programs.

    "In the gap below the telescope and adjacent to the polar axle, note the conjunction of our two brightest planets: Venus, and Jupiter just above and to the left. Although of course still far apart in space, they appear apparently closer together along the line of sight in the sky than the diameter of the moon. Such events are not uncommon, although this occasion was particularly memorable in the early evening sky. With such bright objects in a bright sky, there would have been no reason not to have the dome lights on as shown here, even during actual observing.

    "With such a spectacular machine, it's fun to be able to enjoy it as well. Unfortunately, on this occasion we were unable to observe with the telescope. When the very long telescope is pointed low in the sky as it is in this photograph, access to the eyepiece would be gained by raising the movable dome floor 17 feet to the height of the railed ring seen circling the dome, and movable stairs would have been required to reach the eyepiece. At present, the floor awaits engineering evaluation of the aging mechanical components before it can be returned to normal use. This is a wonderful educational and public outreach tool, and we look forward to restoration of full functionality!"

    "Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the Great Telescope."
                                                 

    ~ Lick Observatory Astronomer James Edward Keeler in The Engineer, 1888 July 6

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Single Frame
    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 16mm f/2.8 fisheye
    2 seconds @ f5.6
    ISO: 200
    Native Resolution: 4912x9000 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Support Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    National Geographic_Venus Jupiter Conjunction 2015 June 30

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Telescope Operators Patrick Maloney, Rodney Norden, and Keith Wandry, as well as University of California Observatories / Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. 

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH7324_Refractor Conjunction Panorama_2015June29
    548,960
    Price On Request

  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7321_RED-GREEN REFRACTOR PANORAMA 

     

    2015 June 29

    Conjunction of Jupiter (upper left) and Venus (lower right)


    With my sincere thank you to Lick Observatory staff for their invaluable collaboration in producing this photograph, special thanks go to Telescope Operators Patrick Maloney, Rod Norden, and Keith Wandry. We had fun! An unusual and unexpected juxtaposition of green dome and red telescope occurred when the telescope operator was standing out of view at the top of the pier opposite the camera, checking his cell phone. The dome was brightened to reveal its normal green color by the neutral ambient phone light. Red areas on the telescope and camera-side of the pier which were out of the phone's neutralizing range reflected the characteristic cherry-colored tint cast by red observing lamps in the dome.

    The following description and comments are contributed by Rem Stone, retired UC Research Astronomer:

    "Lick Observatory's Great 36-inch Refractor was the most powerful telescope in the world when it saw first light in 1888. The long 57-foot focal length (focal ratio f19.3) was intended to make it especially suitable for visual observations of planets, a primary occupation of astronomers of the period. In 1892, E.E. Barnard used this telescope to discover Amalthea, the fifth moon of Jupiter. This was the first such discovery since Galileo observed the first four moons nearly 300 years earlier, and was the last moon discovered with the otherwise unaided eye. This impressive instrument is now used for public viewing and educational programs.

    "In the gap below the telescope and adjacent to the polar axle, note the conjunction of our two brightest planets: Venus, and Jupiter just above and to the left. Although of course still far apart in space, they appear apparently closer together along the line of sight in the sky than the diameter of the moon. Such events are not uncommon, although this occasion was particularly memorable in the early evening sky. With such bright objects in a bright sky, there would have been no reason not to have the dome lights on as shown here, even during actual observing.

    "With such a spectacular machine, it's fun to be able to enjoy it as well. Unfortunately, on this occasion we were unable to observe with the telescope. When the very long telescope is pointed low in the sky as it is in this photograph, access to the eyepiece would be gained by raising the movable dome floor 17 feet to the height of the railed ring seen circling the dome, and movable stairs would have been required to reach the eyepiece. At present, the floor awaits engineering evaluation of the aging mechanical components before it can be returned to normal use. This is a wonderful educational and public outreach tool, and we look forward to restoration of full functionality!"

    "Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the Great Telescope."
                                                 

    ~ Lick Observatory Astronomer James Edward Keeler in The Engineer, 1888 July 6

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Two Frame Panorama
    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 16mm f/2.8 fisheye
    10 seconds @ f2.8
    ISO: 560
    Native Resolution: 4912x9000 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Support Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    National Geographic_Venus Jupiter Conjunction 2015 June 30

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

    Sun / Moon Data US Naval Observatory

     

     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Telescope Operators Patrick Maloney, Rodney Norden, and Keith Wandry, as well as University of California Observatories / Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. 

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH7325_Red Green Refractor Panorama_2015June29
    548,960
    Price On Request

  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7332_GREAT REFRACTOR MEZZANINE SUNSET 

     

    2015 June 30

    This is a 180° fisheye two-frame stitched panoramic image. The camera was positioned on the mezzanine just underneath the exquisitely crafted bracing supports on the lip of the dome, seen here at very close range at the top of the image. The copper-colored swath on the dome at left is light from the setting sun.

    The following description and comments are contributed by Rem Stone, retired UC Research Astronomer:

    "Lick Observatory's Great 36-inch Refractor was the most powerful telescope in the world when it saw first light in 1888. The long 57-foot focal length (focal ratio f19.3) was intended to make it especially suitable for visual observations of planets, a primary occupation of astronomers of the period. E.E. Barnard used this telescope to discover Amalthea, the fifth moon of Jupiter. This was the first such discovery since Galileo discovered the first four moons nearly 300 years earlier, and was the last moon discovered with the otherwise unaided eye. This impressive instrument is now used for public viewing and educational programs.

    It is challenging to capture the unique ambience inside this enormous Victorian structure. Perhaps the experience is described most eloquently by early Lick Director and accomplished astronomer James Keeler in a fascinating article written for the 1888 July 6 issue of The Engineer: "Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the great telescope." Both dome and telescope were technological marvels in their day, and have seen many seminal discoveries. Occasionally used in its second century for research, this venerable telescope frequently inspires classes and visitor groups with enchanting views of the heavens.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Lick Observatory staff and friends for their collaboration and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.

    "Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the Great Telescope."
                                                 

    ~ Lick Observatory Astronomer James Edward Keeler in The Engineer, 1888 July 6

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Two frame vertical panorama
    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 16mm f/2.8 fisheye
    1 second @ f8
    ISO digital: 400
    Native Resolution: 4912x9272 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    PUBLICATIONS

    This image is available in high resolution.

     


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    Support Lick Observatory

    HamCam

    The Nature Conservancy's Mt. Hamilton Project

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    Lick Observatory Collections Project

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Telescope Operators Patrick Maloney, Rodney Norden, and Keith Wandry, as well as University of California Observatories / Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph. 

     


    COPYRIGHT  •  All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.

    IMAGE USE CAVEATS  • here

    PUBLISHERS  •  This image is available in high resolution.

    LICENSING  •   email comment / inquiry

    FINE ART PRINTS  •  Email for size options and price quote

    LH7332_Great Refractor Mezzanine Sunset
    493,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7339_GREAT REFRACTOR VOLUNTEER APPRECIATION NIGHT 

     

    2016 September 10

    Lick Observatory's dedicated cadre of volunteers are treated to an annual Appreciation Night. A highlight of the evening's festivities is viewing favorite celestial objects through the Great Refractor. Note the distintive shadow of the great refractor and open slit on the ceiling panel.

    The following description and comments are contributed by Rem Stone, retired UC Research Astronomer:

    "Lick Observatory's 36-inch Great Refractor was the most powerful telescope in the world when it saw first light in 1888. The long 57-foot focal length (focal ratio f19.3) was intended to make it especially suitable for visual observations of planets, a primary occupation of astronomers of the period. E.E. Barnard used this telescope to discover Amalthea, the fifth moon of Jupiter. This was the first such discovery since Galileo discovered the first four moons nearly 300 years earlier, and was the last moon discovered with the otherwise unaided eye. This impressive instrument is now used for public viewing and educational programs.

    "Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the Great Telescope."
    Lick Observatory Astronomer James Edward Keeler in 'The Engineer', 1888 July 6

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories / Lick Observatory astronomer staff and volunteers for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 16mm f/2.8 fisheye
    13 seconds @ f/4.5
    ISO digital: 400
    Native Resolution: 4912x7360 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7339_Great Refractor Volunteer Appreciation Night
    641,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7385_LICK REFRACTOR VISITOR OBSERVING 

     

    2015 June 26

    Lick Observatory Summer Series: This four second exposure inside the dome of the Lick 36" Great Refractor shows a young visitor observer at the eyepiece, as her older brother looks on. This venerable chamber is often perceived as a place of transition between everyday life on our planet and mysteries of the universe beyond. Perhaps the experience is described most eloquently by early Lick Director and accomplished astronomer James Keeler in a fascinating article written for the 1888 July 6 issue of 'The Engineer', several months after the behemoth instrument saw first light: "Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the great telescope."

    The Summer Series Program series has long been a favorite outing for Bay Area families, with a number of activities ensuring an informative and enjoyable evening. Observing through the Great Refractor is a highlight of the evening. Behind the telescope pier, visitors are seated on the upper level mezzanine. They are awaiting their turn at the eyepiece while listening to a volunteer describe the night's viewing object. The children's parents and Lick Observatory volunteer assistants are standing in the lower foreground. The dome interior is illuminated by red observing lights, which promote dark-adapted vision. The red color is more pronounced in the camera's 4 second time exposure than would appear to the naked eye when one is inside the dome.

    It is challenging to capture the unique ambiance inside this enormous Victorian vault. Both dome and telescope were technological marvels when built in the late 19th century, and in succeeding decades have seen many seminal discoveries. Occasionally used in its second century for research, this telescope frequently inspires visiting classes and summer visitors with enchanting views of the heavens.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories / Lick Observatory astronomer staff and volunteers for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 20 mm f/2.8
    15 seconds @ f2.8
    ISO digital: 400

    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels (including black border)
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7385_Lick Refractor Visitor Observing
    1439,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7401_SUMMER SERIES RON BRICMONT JAMES LICK TOMB TALK 

     

    2015 June 27

    Lick Observatory Summer Series: This fisheye lens multi-frame composite view inside the dome of the Lick 36" Great Refractor features long-time chief volunteer Ron Bricmont wrapping up his history lecture as attendees clap with enthusiastic approval. This venerable chamber is often perceived as a place of transition between everyday life on our planet and mysteries of the universe beyond. Perhaps the experience is described most eloquently by early Lick Director and accomplished astronomer James Keeler in a fascinating article written for the 1888 July 6 issue of 'The Engineer', several months after the behemoth instrument saw first light: “Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the great telescope.”

    The Summer Series Program series has long been a favorite outing for Bay Area families, with a number of activities ensuring an informative and enjoyable evening. Observing through the Great Refractor is a highlight of the evening, as is listening to history and science talks by faculty and volunteers. Ron has been a 'regular' at Lick Observatory since he was a little boy, and several decades ago he founded and continues to lead the Lick Observatory Volunteers program. Ron's dedicated service and that of his fellow volunteers literally makes the Summer Series possible. Ron is also an avid and knowledgeable historian, and has been involved in the Lick Observatory Historical Collections project since it began.

    It is challenging to capture the unique ambiance inside this enormous Victorian vault. Both dome and telescope were technological marvels when built in the late 19th century, and in succeeding decades have seen many seminal discoveries. Occasionally used in its second century for research, this telescope frequently inspires visiting classes and visitors with enchanting views of the heavens.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D800E
    Nikkor 16 mm f/2.8 fisheye
    1/30 second @ f2.8
    ISO digital equivalent: 4500
    Native Resolution: 6860x4084 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7402_Summer Series Ron Bricmont James Lick Tomb Talk
    1440,857
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7401_SUMMER SERIES RON BRICMONT HISTORY LECTURE 

     

    2015 September 12

    Lick Observatory Summer Series: This fisheye lens multi-frame composite view inside the dome of the Lick 36" Great Refractor features long-time chief volunteer Ron Bricmont wrapping up his history lecture as attendees clap with enthusiastic approval. This venerable chamber is often perceived as a place of transition between everyday life on our planet and mysteries of the universe beyond. Perhaps the experience is described most eloquently by early Lick Director and accomplished astronomer James Keeler in a fascinating article written for the 1888 July 6 issue of 'The Engineer', several months after the behemoth instrument saw first light: “Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the great telescope.”

    The Summer Series Program series has long been a favorite outing for Bay Area families, with a number of activities ensuring an informative and enjoyable evening. Observing through the Great Refractor is a highlight of the evening, as is listening to history and science talks by faculty and volunteers. Ron has been a 'regular' at Lick Observatory since he was a little boy, and several decades ago he founded and continues to lead the Lick Observatory Volunteers program. Ron's dedicated service and that of his fellow volunteers literally makes the Summer Series possible. Ron is also an avid and knowledgeable historian, and has been involved in the Lick Observatory Historical Collections project since it began.

    It is challenging to capture the unique ambiance inside this enormous Victorian vault. Both dome and telescope were technological marvels when built in the late 19th century, and in succeeding decades have seen many seminal discoveries. Occasionally used in its second century for research, this telescope frequently inspires visiting classes and visitors with enchanting views of the heavens.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D800E
    Nikkor 16 mm f/2.8 fisheye
    1/15 second @ f2.8
    ISO digital equivalent: 3200
    Four-frame stitched panoramic composite, spanning 180° horizontally and 110° vertically.
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels (including black border)
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7401_Summer Series Ron Bricmont History Lecture
    816,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7420_GREAT REFRACTOR OBSERVING 

     

    2018 June 17

    During this 13-second exposure through an 8mm fisheye lens, visitor observing is underway inside the dome of the Lick 36" Great Refractor. The group is seated on the upper mezzanine bench. When it is their turn at the eyepiece, they will circle around the mezzanine to the stairway at center far left. Volunteers and staff are assisting on the floor, describing objects seen through the telescope and answering visitor's questions.

    The dome interior is illuminated by red observing lights, which preserve night vision acuity of visitors who have become dark-adapted. The red color is more pronounced and saturated in the camera's 13 seconds time exposure than would appear to the naked eye when one is inside the dome.

    It is challenging to capture the unique ambience inside this enormous Victorian structure. Perhaps the experience is described most eloquently by early Lick Director and accomplished astronomer James Keeler in a fascinating article written for the 1888 July 6 issue of The Engineer: "Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the great telescope." Both dome and telescope were technological marvels in their day, and have seen many seminal discoveries. Occasionally used in its second century for research, this venerable telescope frequently inspires classes and visitor groups with enchanting views of the heavens.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their collaboration and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 8-15 mm f/3.5-4.5 fisheye
    13 seconds @ f3.5
    dual flash used on all exposures, plus interior lighting
    ISO digital equivalent: 5000
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels (including black border)
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7420_Great Refractor Observing
    1127,960
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7420_GOOD NIGHT GREAT REFRACTOR 

     

    2018 June 17

    During this 20 second exposure through an 8mm fisheye lens, the Lick Observatory's Public Tour observing is drawing to a close. The last visitors are leaving the Main Building parking lot, and telescope operators will soon rotate the 36-Inch Great Refractor to its stow position, and close the dome.

    A multitude of lens flairs mimic imaginary UFOs mingling with the Milky Way above the great dome.

    "Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the Great Telescope." Lick Observatory Astronomer James Edward Keeler in The Engineer, 1888 July 6

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their collaboration and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 8-15 mm f/3.5-4.5 fisheye
    20 seconds @ f3.5
    ISO digital equivalent: 800
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels (including black border)
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7417_Goodnight Great Refractor
    1127,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7319_MAIN BUILDING GEMINIDS 

     

    2014 December 13

    In this view through a fisheye lens, a Geminids meteor streaks over the Main Building. Note the Pleiades above the meteor trail, and Orion rising through gauzy clouds at the roof line. Both the Main Building and clouds are tinted by saffron-colored low pressure sodium lights from the city of San José in the valley below.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their collaboration and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    This image is a High Dynamic Range composite of three frames from one photo session, using the same camera, lens, and tripod position. My objective in shooting and processing this composite was to maximize capabilities of the camera CCD and fisheye lens, and to avoid their respective weaknesses in capturing a wide range of light values. The goal was to more authentically convey what I witnessed in the moment of capture.

    Sky and Meteor:
    Nikon D800E
    Nikkor 16 mm f/2.8 fisheye
    15 seconds @ f2.8
    ISO digital: 800

    Main Building:
    Nikon D800E
    Nikkor 16 mm f/2.8 fisheye
    120 seconds @ f8
    ISO digital: 400

    Main Building Entry:
    Nikon D800E
    Nikkor 16 mm f/2.8 fisheye
    60 seconds @ f8
    ISO digital: 400

    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels (including black border)
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7319_Main Building Geminids
    1421,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11


    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA



    LH7431 MAIN BUILDING MILKY WA - SATURN - JUPITER CONJUNCTION 


    2020 July 23

    This scene shows comet NEOWISE setting over the horizon of north San Francisco Bay. Wildfires in the region have blanketed the area in smoke. The International Space Station (ISS) streaks across the scene, with spaces marking one-second intervals between a series of 17 six-second frames. The Big Dipper/Ursa Major constellation gleams high in the sky above.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D850
    Nikkor 24 mm f/1.4
    5.7 seconds @ f2.2
    ISO: 1600
    Native Resolution: 5631x4922 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.



    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory



    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS


    Email for size options and price quote


    LICENSING


    Email your inquiry / comment





    LH7434_Main Bulilding Milky Way Saturn Jupiter Conjunction
    1098,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7413_SEPTEMBER SUNNY MAIN BUILDING 

     

    2015 September 29

    It's a beautiful day in September at Lick Observatory's Main Building. The dome of the 36" Great Refractor is at right. A late 1890's travel booklet states: "It is a liberal education to visit Mt. Hamilton. The vastness of the universe, the achievements of science are sufficient to fill the heart and to occupy the mind of the most intellectual and ambitious." Visitors, scientists, and photographers have been irresistibly drawn here since the Great Refractor saw first light in 1888.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Two frame panoramic composite:
    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 28-300 mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom
    1/6000 second @ f5.6
    ISO digital equivalent: 140
    Native Resolution: 7800x5100 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7413_September Sunny Main Building
    1439,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7424_MAIN BUILDING SUNSET PORTRAIT 

     

    2020 May 24

    It's a beautiful sunset evening in May at Lick Observatory's Main Building. The dome of the 36" Great Refractor is at right. A late 1890's travel booklet states: "It is a liberal education to visit Mt. Hamilton. The vastness of the universe, the achievements of science are sufficient to fill the heart and to occupy the mind of the most intellectual and ambitious." Visitors, scientists, and photographers have been irresistably drawn here since the Great Refractor saw first light in 1888.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Two frame panoramic composite:
    Nikon D850
    Nikkor 80-400 mm f/4.5-5.6 zoom
    1/100 second @ f5.6
    ISO digital equivalent: 160
    Native Resolution: 8256x5504 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7424_MB Sunset Portrait
    1440,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7318_MAIN BUILDING LUNAR ECLIPSE  

     

    2014 April 15

    The "Blood Moon" lunar eclipse is shown in totality. The time is 12:41:06 AM Pacific Daylight at Lick Observatory's Main Building parapet, with the 36" Great Lick Refractor visible through the open dome slit. A gauzy layer of cirrus clouds partially obscures the moon and softens its glow, and enhances the blue glow of the star Spica to the right. Mars is shining higher, with its characteristic ruddy color. Saffron-colored low pressure sodium lights from the city of San José in the valley below are reflected by the clouds, tinting them reddish-gold.

    This image is a multi-frame stacked and stitched panoramic composite, with extended dynamic range (HDR) and enlarged field of view. The various frames were shot using two cameras placed side by side, with different lenses on each camera. My objective in shooting and processing this composite was to more accurately convey what I saw in the moment of capture.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Dr. Elinor Gates and her University of California Observatories / Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    This image is a stacked and stitched combination of High Dynamic Range and Panoramic Compositing. Frames were from two side by side cameras, using different lenses on each camera.

    Moon, Spica, Mars
    Nikon D800
    Nikkor 300mm f/2.8mm lens
    2 seconds @ f2.8
    ISO digital: 125

    Land and Sky
    Nikon D7000
    Nikkor 28-300 f/3.5-5.6
    30 seconds @ f/3.5
    ISO digital: 100

    Native Resolution: 4347x6193 pixels (including black border)
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7318_2014Apr15_LO-Main Building Lunar Eclipse Totality Panoram
    674,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7409_LICK OBSERVATORY GOOGLE NIGHT 2016 

     

    2016 September 23

    Google staff members and their families enjoy a VIP night of private viewing and exploring Lick Observatory. Thank you Google for your generous donations! The general pubic is invited to attend the Summer Series Program series, which has long been a favorite outing for Bay Area families, with a number of activities ensuring an informative and enjoyable evening.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their collaboration and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 20 mm 1.8
    8 seconds @ f4.5
    ISO digital equivalent: 320
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7409c_Lick Observatory Google Night 2016
    873,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7409_NICKEL REFLECTOR GOOGLE NIGHT 2016 

     

    2016 September 23

    A view of the Nickel 40" Reflector, on Google Night at Lick Observatory. Google staff members and their families enjoy a VIP night of private viewing and exploring the Observatory. Thank you Google for your generous donations! The general pubic is invited to attend the Summer Series Program series, which has long been a favorite outing for Bay Area families, with a number of activities ensuring an informative and enjoyable evening.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 28-300 zoom f3.5-5.6
    5 seconds @ f6.3
    ISO digital equivalent: 200
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH74012_Nickel Reflector Google Night 2016
    1439,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7411_GREAT REFRACTOR VISITOR VIEW 

     

    2016 June 11

    Volunteer amateur astronomers have set up an array of refracting and reflecting telescopes in the courtyard behind the Lick Observatory Main Building. Visitors are viewing selected objects at each instrument, and discussing astronomy and equipment with the knowledgeable volunteers. This 26-frame stacked composite consists of twenty seconds per successive frame with a one second interlude between frames -- just over nine minutes total elapsed time. The International Space Station arcs overhead from left to right, visible for almost three minutes during this period. The composited ISS streak is separated into segments which show distance traveled during each twenty second exposure. Dark spaces reveal one second intervals when the camera shutter blinked between frames. Streaks at lower right show the paths of aircraft. All sky light sources (stars, planets, etc.) are composited into nine minute trails, and the foreground is a selected blending of courtyard activity. The dome just left of center and to the rear in the lower part of the image houses the Nickel 40" Reflector, which is also being used for visitor observing. The Nickel dome is fortuitously aimed toward the camera, and red observing lights are visible in the open slit. Red lights inside and outside preserve night vision to enable more sensitive observations. The dome at foreground mid right does not enclose a telescope but rather is a cupola which houses a sculpture of the Reverend Laurentine Hamilton, for whom Mount Hamilton is named.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their collaboration and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 16 mm f/2.8
    20 seconds per frame, 1 second intervals@ f5
    26 successive frames
    545 second stacked time exposure, 9 minutes 5 seconds
    ISS Transit: 2 minutes 47 seconds
    ISO digital equivalent: 800
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7410_Lick Observatory ISS Summer Series
    1439,960
    Price On Request
  • 7443_Main Building ISS Occults the Moon © 2015 Laurie Hatch, image and text - LICK OBSERVATORY - Mt. Hamilton California - 2015 June 21 The International Space Station streaks across the sky above the Main Building courtyard and dome of the Lick Great Refractor. The ISS trajectory is segmented into 44 exposures of 4 seconds each with 1 second intervals between frames. How exciting it was to see the ISS trail perfectly occult the waxing crescent Moon (29% illumination)! This occultation was unplanned and unexpected. At the end of the ISS transit, Retired University of California Research Astronomer Remington Stone returns to the Main Building. - Thank you to UCO/Lick Observatory for supporting this documentary endeavor. - A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY - Lick Observatory crowns the 4,200-foot Mt. Hamilton summit above Silicon Valley in central California. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area tycoon and philanthropist James Lick (1796-1876) bequeathed funding for construction which spanned from 1880 to 1887, fulfilling his vision of the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility. In 1959, the Shane 3-meter reflecting telescope was completed on Mt. Hamilton. It continues to provide data for forefront research and engineering programs. In total, the mountain top is home to ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space. - EXPOSURE DATA: Nikon D810 Nikkor 16mm f/2.8 fisheye 4 sec @ f/5.6 ISO digital: 100 44 stacked frames ISS contrast against the sky is corrected to more closely resemble brightness as seen at the time of exposure. Native Resolution: 7361x4914 pixels Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output. - For more information: http://w
    LH7443_Main Building ISS Occults the Moon
    1440,816
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7415_PANORAMIC SETI IN THE ASTROGRAPH 

     

    2020 February 7

    A team* of astronomers have installed two prototype SETI (Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence) telescopes into the refurbished dome at Lick Observatory which houses the historic Carnegie Astrograph. Panoramic SETI (PANOSETI) will ultimately utilize a configuration of many SETI telescopes which will allow simultaneously monitoring the entire observable sky whenever weather permits. The unique, compact telescope design uses Fresnel lenses combined with fast-response (nanosecond) optical sensors to search for very brief optical pulses. The first pair of 0.5m telescopes will image the sky with a 10 degree by 10 degree field of view every billionth of a second. The program aims to discover very brief optical pulses that may arise either from astrophysical sources or extraterrestrial communication ("technosignatures"). Lick staff has recently completed a magnificent restoration of the 80-year old dome. The new installation has been achieved without disturbing the historic first telescope occupant of the dome.

    *Team Members: Shelley Wright (PI, UCSD), Franklin Antonio (Qualcomm), Michael Aronson (Electronic Packaging Man), Samuel Chaim-Weismann (Berkeley), Maren Cosens (UCSD), Frank Drake (SETI Institute), Paul Horowitz (Harvard), Andrew Howard (Caltech), Jérôme Maire (UCSD), Rick Raffanti (Techne Instruments), Andrew Siemon (Berkeley), Remington Stone (Lick Observatory), Richard Treffers (Starman Systems), Avinash Uttamchandani (Harvard), Dan Werthimer (Berkeley, Space Sciences Laboratory).

    Thank you to UCO/Lick Observatory and the PANOSETI team for supporting this documentary endeavor.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Dome Interior:
    Nikon D850
    Nikkor 24 mm f/1.4
    5 minutes @ f8
    ISO digital equivalent: 125

    Dome Exterior and Star Trails:
    Nikon D850
    Nikkor 24 mm f/1.4
    10 minutes @ f8
    ISO digital equivalent: 100

    Native Resolution: 8256x5504 pixels (including black border)
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

    PANOSETI

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    7415_Panoramic SETI in the Astrograph
    1440,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH2165 MOONLIT APF AND BIG DIPPER 

     

    2015 August 26

    In this view through a fisheye lens, the 2.4-meter moonlit APF is framed by a starry sky, with the Lick Observatory Main Building seen in the distance. Fully robotic and equipped with a high-resolution spectrograph optimized for precision Doppler measurements, it enables enable off-site astronomers to detect rocky planets of Earth-size masses within our local galactic neighborhood.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 16MM F/2.8 fisheye lens
    15 seconds @ f/4.8
    ISO digital: 800
    Native Resolution: 6015x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH2165_Moonlit APF and Big Dipper
    1176,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH0035_VENUS MOONRISE MORNING 

     

    2001 August

    This early morning 20-minute time exposure records the paths of the Venus and the Moon rising above dome of the Shane 120" Reflector. Light from the brightening eastern sky spills over the flank of nearby Kepler Peak.

    - The Shane 120" Reflector was the second largest telescope in the world when it was completed in 1959. It bears the name of former Lick Observatory director and astronomer Donald Shane, who spearheaded its development. The mirror was originally a test blank for the Palomar 200" Reflector, then the world's largest telescope. (Pyrex glass was invented specifically for use in these mirrors.) Although the Shane is modest in size by current standards, state-of-the-art research progresses in several fields, including adaptive optics and laser guide-star programs. Using the incomparable Hamilton Spectrograph, the Shane is a leader in discovering planets orbiting nearby stars.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Hasselblad 503 CW, CFE 40 f/4 lens
    Kodak E100VS Color Reversal film
    Exposure: 20 minutes @ f/8
    Imacon digital scan
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH0035_3-Meter Venus Moonrise Morning
    959,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7330_SHANE 3M VOLUNTEER TOUR - REM STONE SMILING 

     

    2016 September 23

    Research Astronomer (Retired) Remington Stone accompanies Lick Observatory volunteers as they enter the Shane 3-meter Reflector dome. This is their annual Volunteer Appreciation Night, being let by Dr. Elinor Gates (see image LH7330)..

    The Shane 120" Reflector was the second largest telescope in the world when it was completed in 1959. It bears the name of former Lick Observatory director and astronomer Donald Shane, who spearheaded its development. The mirror was originally a test blank for the Palomar 200" Reflector, then the world's largest telescope. (Pyrex glass was invented specifically for use in these mirrors.) Although the Shane is modest in size by current standards, state-of-the-art research progresses in several fields, including adaptive optics and laser guide-star programs. Using the incomparable Hamilton Spectrograph, the Shane is a leader in discovering planets orbiting nearby stars.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 8.0-15.0 f/3.5-4.5 fisheye lens
    1/8000 second @ f/5.0, 8 mm
    ISO digital: 800
    Native Resolution: 5100x5100 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7331_Shane 3m Volunteer Tour - Rem Stone Smiling
    960,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7330_SHANE 3M VOLUNTEER TOUR WITH DR. ELINOR GATES 

     

    2016 September 23

    Resident Astronomer Dr. Elinor Gates describes the Shane 3-meter Reflector to Lick Observatory Volunteers during their annual Volunteer Appreciation Night.

    The Shane 120" Reflector was the second largest telescope in the world when it was completed in 1959. It bears the name of former Lick Observatory director and astronomer Donald Shane, who spearheaded its development. The mirror was originally a test blank for the Palomar 200" Reflector, then the world's largest telescope. (Pyrex glass was invented specifically for use in these mirrors.) Although the Shane is modest in size by current standards, state-of-the-art research progresses in several fields, including adaptive optics and laser guide-star programs. Using the incomparable Hamilton Spectrograph, the Shane is a leader in discovering planets orbiting nearby stars.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 8.0-15.0 f/3.5-4.5 fisheye lens
    1/80 second @ f/5.0, 8 mm
    ISO digital: 1250
    Native Resolution: 5100x5100 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7330_Shane 3m Volunteer Tour With Dr. Elinor Gates
    960,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7334_SHANE 3M AND LICK OBSERVATORY VOLUNTEERS

     

    2015 September 19

    The annual 2015 Volunteer Appreciation Night includes an exclusive tour of the Shane 3-meter Telescope. These volunteers have concluded the Summer Series season, which otherwise would not be possible without their generous assistance and leadership.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 zoom lens
    1/45 second @ f2.8, 14mm
    ISO digital: 2200
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7334_Shane 3m and Lick Observatory Volunteers
    1440,659
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7326_SHANE 3M LASER GUIDE STAR PORTRAIT 

     

    2014 March 15

    SUMMARY: ADAPTIVE OPTICS \ LASER GUIDE STAR

    Many celestial images are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth's turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that pass through as they arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But the extraordinary technology described above is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 10 -watt laser beam creates a bright "artificial star" high in the atmosphere 90 kilometers above the ground, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance or "twinkling" in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser "star" and faint target object then come into clear focus, yielding precise celestial images that rival those from space telescopes.

    SCALE

    Diameter of laser beam: 25 centimeters (~ 9.8 inches)
    Diameter of top ring of telescope: 3.6 meters (~ 11.8 feet)
    Width of dome opening ("slit"): 6.7 meters (~ 22 feet)

    NOTES

    The slit width is uniform throughout. In this photograph, the apparent spread in diameter and vertical distortion are a function of camera position, perspective, and wide angle lens optical distortion. The laser launch tube is positioned on the side of the telescope. In neutral light, the brushed aluminum dome interior is silver in color. However, the dome is tinted by scattered light from the laser.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24 mm f/2.8 lens
    1/1000 second @ f5.6
    ISO digital: 800
    Native Resolution: 7360X4912x2848 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7326_Shane 3m LGS Portrait
    1438,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7327_SHANE 3M LASER GUIDE STAR MOON GLOW 

     

    2014 March 15

           
    SUMMARY: ADAPTIVE OPTICS \ LASER GUIDE STAR

    Many celestial images are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth's turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that pass through as they arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But the extraordinary technology described above is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 10 -watt laser beam creates a bright "artificial star" high in the atmosphere 90 kilometers above the ground, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance or "twinkling" in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser "star" and faint target object then come into clear focus, yielding precise celestial images that rival those from space telescopes.

    This view shows Shane 3m telescope while the Adaptive Optics Laser Guide star is propagating. Astronomer Sloane Wiktorowicz is observing in the adajent 3m control room.

    SCALE

    Diameter of laser beam: 25 centimeters (~ 9.8 inches)
    Diameter of top ring of telescope: 3.6 meters (~ 11.8 feet)
    Width of dome opening ("slit"): 6.7 meters (~ 22 feet)

    NOTES

    The slit width is uniform throughout. In this photograph, the apparent spread in diameter and vertical distortion are a function of camera position, perspective, and wide angle lens optical distortion. In neutral light, the brushed aluminum dome interior is silver in color. However, the dome is tinted by scattered light from the laser. Due to the lengthy 30-second exposure, colors in both dome and laser are more saturated and intense than are seen with the naked eye, which refreshes every fraction of a second.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24 mm f/2.8 lens
    30 seconds @ f7.1
    ISO digital: 800
    Native Resolution: 4912x5433 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7327_Shane 3m LGS Moon Glow
    786,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7329_SHANE 3M LASER GUIDE STAR ORION 

     

    2017 October 3

    This view shows the Shane 3m telescope through a fisheye lens. Moonlight brightens the edge of the slit and makes a swath on the dome. The laser launch tube is positioned on the right side of the telescope. In neutral light, the brushed aluminum dome interior is silver in color. However, the dome is tinted by scattered light from the sodium laser..

          
    SUMMARY: ADAPTIVE OPTICS \ LASER GUIDE STAR

    Many celestial images are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth's turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that pass through as they arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But the extraordinary technology described above is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 10 -watt laser beam creates a bright "artificial star" high in the atmosphere 90 kilometers above the ground, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance or "twinkling" in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser "star" and faint target object then come into clear focus, yielding precise celestial images that rival those from space telescopes.

    This view shows Shane 3m telescope while the Adaptive Optics Laser Guide star is propagating. Astronomer Sloane Wiktorowicz is observing in the adajent 3m control room.

    SCALE

    Diameter of laser beam: 25 centimeters (~ 9.8 inches)
    Diameter of top ring of telescope: 3.6 meters (~ 11.8 feet)
    Width of dome opening ("slit"): 6.7 meters (~ 22 feet)

    NOTES

    The slit width is uniform throughout. In this photograph, the apparent spread in diameter and vertical distortion are a function of camera position, perspective, and wide angle lens optical distortion. The laser launch tube is positioned on the side of the telescope. In neutral light, the brushed aluminum dome interior is silver in color. However, the dome is tinted by scattered light from the laser.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Mount Hamilton technical support staff for their generous assistance and invaluable collaboration in producing this photograph.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 8.0-15.0  f/3.5-4.5  fisheye lens8 lens
    20 seconds @ f4.5, 15.0mm
    ISO digital: 2500
    Native Resolution: 73604912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7329_Shane 3m Laser Guide Star Orion
    1439,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7329p_SHANE 3M LASER GUIDE STAR ORION 

     

    2017 October 3

    This view shows the Shane 3m telescope through a fisheye lens. Moonlight brightens the edge of the slit and makes a swath on the dome. The laser launch tube is positioned on the right side of the telescope. In neutral light, the brushed aluminum dome interior is silver in color. However, the dome is tinted by scattered light from the sodium laser..

          
    SUMMARY: ADAPTIVE OPTICS \ LASER GUIDE STAR

    Many celestial images are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth's turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that pass through as they arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But the extraordinary technology described above is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 10 -watt laser beam creates a bright "artificial star" high in the atmosphere 90 kilometers above the ground, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance or "twinkling" in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser "star" and faint target object then come into clear focus, yielding precise celestial images that rival those from space telescopes.

    This view shows Shane 3m telescope while the Adaptive Optics Laser Guide star is propagating. Astronomer Sloane Wiktorowicz is observing in the adajent 3m control room.

    SCALE

    Diameter of laser beam: 25 centimeters (~ 9.8 inches)
    Diameter of top ring of telescope: 3.6 meters (~ 11.8 feet)
    Width of dome opening ("slit"): 6.7 meters (~ 22 feet)

    NOTES

    The slit width is uniform throughout. In this photograph, the apparent spread in diameter and vertical distortion are a function of camera position, perspective, and wide angle lens optical distortion. The laser launch tube is positioned on the side of the telescope. In neutral light, the brushed aluminum dome interior is silver in color. However, the dome is tinted by scattered light from the laser.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Mount Hamilton technical support staff for their generous assistance and invaluable collaboration in producing this photograph.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 8.0-15.0  f/3.5-4.5  fisheye lens8 lens
    20 seconds @ f4.5, 15.0mm
    ISO digital: 2500
    Native Resolution: 73604912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7329p_Shane 3m Laser Guide Star Orion
    1440,630
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7317_SHANE 3M LASER GUIDE STAR SLOANE 

     

    2014 March 16

    This view shows instrumentation at the lower end of the Shane 3m telescope while the Adaptive Optics Laser Guide star is propagating. UCSC Astronomer Sloane Wiktorowicz is observing in the adajent 3m control room.

          
    SUMMARY: ADAPTIVE OPTICS \ LASER GUIDE STAR

    Many celestial images are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth's turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that pass through as they arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But the extraordinary technology described above is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 10 -watt laser beam creates a bright "artificial star" high in the atmosphere 90 kilometers above the ground, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance or "twinkling" in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser "star" and faint target object then come into clear focus, yielding precise celestial images that rival those from space telescopes.

    This view shows Shane 3m telescope while the Adaptive Optics Laser Guide star is propagating. Astronomer Sloane Wiktorowicz is observing in the adajent 3m control room.

    SCALE

    Diameter of laser beam: 25 centimeters (~ 9.8 inches)
    Diameter of top ring of telescope: 3.6 meters (~ 11.8 feet)
    Width of dome opening ("slit"): 6.7 meters (~ 22 feet)

    NOTES

    The laser beam can be seen in upper left of the open slit.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to UCSC Astronomer Sloane Wiktorowicz for granting access to the dome during observations. Special thanks go to Dr. Elinor Gates and the Mount Hamilton technical support staff for their generous assistance and invaluable collaboration in producing this photograph.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 14-24 mm f/2.8 lens
    15 and 30 seconds @ f5.6
    ISO digital: 800
    Native Resolution: 73604912 pixels
    Two-frame Panoramic Composite
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7317_3mLGS_SloaneW
    772,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7328_SHANE 3M LASER GUIDE STAR WAXING MOON 

     

    2017 October 3

    This view shows the moonlit Shane 3m telescope through a 180 degree fisheye lens. The bright Moon (93% illuminated) appears at the top of the photograph, but is in fact behind the camera and approaching the (upside down) horizon slightly south of west. Above the image disc is a lens flair or similar internal reflection in the camera. Rather than crop it out of the image, I chose to include it as it lent an otherworldly quality to the image.

    Also note that although the open slit width is actually uniform, the apparent spread in diameter in this photograph is a function of camera position, perspective, and ultra-wide fisheye optical distortion. The laser launch tube is positioned on the right side of the telescope. In neutral light, the brushed aluminum dome interior is silver in color. However, the dome is tinted by scattered light from the laser.

          
    SUMMARY: ADAPTIVE OPTICS \ LASER GUIDE STAR

    Many celestial images are very faint, such as those that lie in the most remote regions of the universe. Earth's turbulent atmosphere blurs celestial images that pass through as they arrive at the telescope, making observation and analysis difficult. But the extraordinary technology described above is revolutionizing ground-based astronomy. This 10 -watt laser beam creates a bright "artificial star" high in the atmosphere 90 kilometers above the ground, along the line of sight to the object being observed. Astronomers then measure the atmospheric disturbance or "twinkling" in the artificial star, and make rapid counter-corrections by continually deforming a small flexible mirror in the light path. Both laser "star" and faint target object then come into clear focus, yielding precise celestial images that rival those from space telescopes.

    This view shows Shane 3m telescope while the Adaptive Optics Laser Guide star is propagating. Astronomer Sloane Wiktorowicz is observing in the adajent 3m control room.

    SCALE

    Diameter of laser beam: 25 centimeters (~ 9.8 inches)
    Diameter of top ring of telescope: 3.6 meters (~ 11.8 feet)
    Width of dome opening ("slit"): 6.7 meters (~ 22 feet)

    NOTES

    The slit width is uniform throughout. In this photograph, the apparent spread in diameter and vertical distortion are a function of camera position, perspective, and wide angle lens optical distortion. The laser launch tube is positioned on the side of the telescope. In neutral light, the brushed aluminum dome interior is silver in color. However, the dome is tinted by scattered light from the sodium laser.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Mount Hamilton technical support staff for their generous assistance and invaluable collaboration in producing this photograph.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 8.0-15.0  f/3.5-4.5  fisheye lens8 lens
    25 seconds @ f4.5, 8.0 mm
    ISO digital: 1000
    Native Resolution: 7360x5433 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7329_Shane 3m Laser Guide Star Waxing Moon
    823,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7439_MAIN BUILDING - MOON - PLANETS - PERSEID 

     

    2020 August 12

    In this view through a fisheye lens, the Lick Observatory Main Building is crowned by the rising waxing Moon (44% illumination). Flanking either side of the Moon is Venus at lower left, just cresting the roofline, and Mars at upper right. A Perseid Meteor flashes at lower right, between the foyer entrance and dome of the Great Lick Refractor.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Single Frame
    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 8.0-15.0 f/3.5-4.5 fisheye lens
    20 seconds @ f/3.5, 8 mm
    ISO digital: 1250
    Native Resolution: 5100x5100 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7439_Main Building Moon-Planets-Perseid
    960,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7438_MAIN BUILDING - ISS - FULL MOONRISE - SATURN - JUPITER 

     

    2020 August 2

    In this view through a fisheye lens, the International Space Station streaks over the Lick Observatory Main Building. The moon has risen, and its path intersects with the trail of Saturn. Just forward and slightly right is Jupiter's trail. The ISS' segmented trail shows one-second lapses between a series of 128 stacked frames.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 8.0-15.0 f/3.5-4.5 fisheye lens
    15 seconds @ f/3.5, 8 mm
    ISO digital: 500
    Native Resolution: 5696x5696 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7438_Main Building-ISS-FullMoonrise-Saturn-Jupiter
    960,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7335_MAIN BUILDING - ISS - STAR TRAILS 

     

    2020 July 15

    In this view through a fisheye lens, the Lick Observatory Main Building is seen in the distance (lower left) as the International Space Station arcss overhead. Its segmented trail shows one-second lapses between a series of 79 stacked eight-second frames. Headlights and red taillights mark the paths of vehicles coming and going on Mount Hamilton Road.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 8.0-15.0 f/3.5-4.5 fisheye lens
    8 seconds @ f/5.0, 8 mm
    ISO digital: 640
    Native Resolution: 5100x5100 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7435_Main Building-ISS-Star Trails
    960,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH730_MAIN BUILDING MILKY WAY STAR TRAILS 

     

    2018 June 17

    During this 5-minute exposure, star trails and fuzzy smudges record motion of the Milky Way just above the Main Building. Light from departing Summer Visitor vehicles illuminates the domes and highway below.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor lens unrecorded
    300 seconds
    ISO digital: 500
    Native Resolution: 7360X4912x2848 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7430_Main Building Milky Way Star Trails
    1439,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH741_MAIN BUILDING MAY MOONRISE I 

     

    2018 May 28

    The full moon rises behind Lick Observatory's Main Building.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 80-400 f/4.5-5.6 zoom
    1/20 sec @ f/8
    ISO digital: 125
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7441_Main Building May Moonrise I
    1121,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH742_MAIN BUILDING MAY MOONRISE II 

     

    2018 May 28

    The full moon is obscured by foreground leaves as it rises beyond Lick Observatory's Main Building.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 80-400 f/4.5-5.6 zoom
    1/20 sec @ f/8
    ISO digital: 125
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7442_Main Building May Moonrise II
    1121,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7422 MAIN BUILDING WILDFLOWERS 

     

    2005 April 12

    A rainy spring has produced an abundant variety of wildflowers on what is known to Mount Hamilton residents as Tortilla Flat -- a scenic hillock from which to view Lick Observatory's Main Building. Tall purple-blue Lupine clumps are interspersed with Gilia, Fiddlenecks, Owls Clover, Popcorn flowers, Yellow Violets, and more. If only the camera could capture the fragrance of wildflowers!

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D100
    Nikkor 20 mm lens
    1/1500 second @ f9.0
    ISO digital: 400
    Native Resolution: 3008x200 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    unds for construction which spanned the 1880s, fulfilling his vision of a premier astronomical facility. The 36-inch Great Refactor was the most powerful telescope on the planet when inaugurated in 1888. The Shane 3-meter Reflector saw first light in 1959; it produces forefront research and innovative engineering programs, and is used to train student scientists. Newer robotic telescopes detect supernovae, and discover extra-solar planets in our Milky Way Galaxy. Most of Mt. Hamilton's ten telescopes are in active use, supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space. - EXPOSURE DATA: Nikon D100 Nikkor 20mm wide angle lens 1/1500 second @ f9 ISO:400 Native Resolution: 3008x2000 pixels Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output. - Thank you to UCO/Lick Observatory for supporting this documentary endeavor. - FOR MORE INFORMATION: http://www.ucolick.org, https://www.ucolick.org/public/telescopes/36-inch.html, info@lauriehatch.com, http://www.lauriehatch
    LH7422_Main Building Wildflowers
    1440,957
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7335_MAIN BUILDING PEEK A BOO TOO 

     

    2008 May 10

    The covered lens of the Lick 36" Great Refractor is visible through the open slit in this aerial view of Lick Observatory's Main Building.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2X
    Nikkor 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    1/5000 second @ f/4.0, 48mm
    ISO digital: 100
    Native Resolution: 4288x2848 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7335_Main Building Peek A Boo Too
    1362,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7425_MOUNT HAMILTON SKYLINE III 

     

    2006 May 14

    An early 20th century travel booklet states: "It is a liberal education to visit Mt. Hamilton. The vastness of the universe, the achievements of science are sufficient to fill the heart and to occupy the mind of the most intellectual and ambitious." Formerly known as La Sierra Ysabel, "The Ham" is now populated by ten telescopes whose ages span over 130 years. Looking east from left to right, foreground: The Main Building houses the 4-inch Nickel Reflector on the left; the larger open dome of the Lick 36-inch Refractor is right. In the middle ground are four domes left to right (only three are readily visible): the silver Crocker dome, the large Shane 3-meter Reflector, the Carnegie Astrograph (virtually hidden), and the 2.4-meter Automated Planet Finder. The dome of the 0.76-meter Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope is in the center background. Although the Shane dome appears smaller in this photo than that of the Lick Refractor, they are actually very similar in size.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2X
    Nikkor 24-120 mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    1/1000 second @ f5.6
    ISO digital: 100
    Native Resolution: 4288x2848 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7425_Mount Hamilton Skyline III
    1440,956
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7425c_MOUNT HAMILTON SKYLINE III 

     

    2006 May 14

    An early 20th century travel booklet states: "It is a liberal education to visit Mt. Hamilton. The vastness of the universe, the achievements of science are sufficient to fill the heart and to occupy the mind of the most intellectual and ambitious." Formerly known as La Sierra Ysabel, "The Ham" is now populated by ten telescopes whose ages span over 130 years. Looking east from left to right, foreground: The Main Building houses the 4-inch Nickel Reflector on the left; the larger open dome of the Lick 36-inch Refractor is right. In the middle ground are four domes left to right (only three are readily visible): the silver Crocker dome, the large Shane 3-meter Reflector, the Carnegie Astrograph (virtually hidden), and the 2.4-meter Automated Planet Finder. The dome of the 0.76-meter Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope is in the center background. Although the Shane dome appears smaller in this photo than that of the Lick Refractor, they are actually very similar in size.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2X
    Nikkor 24-120 mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    1/1000 second @ f5.6
    ISO digital: 100
    Native Resolution: 4288x2848 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7425c_Mount Hamilton Skyline III
    942,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7437_MAIN BUILDING DOWNTOWN MOUNT HAMILTON 

     

    2019 February 18

    "Downtown" Mount Hamilton and the Main Building are seen from Tycho Brahe Peak.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their collaboration and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D850
    Nikkor 35mm f/1.4
    1/400 sec @ f/16
    ISO digital: 125
    Native Resolution: 82256x5504 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your usage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7437_Main Building Downtown Mountt Hamilton
    1440,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH4036_SNOW MIST MAIN BUILDING 

     

    2006 March 11

    Clad in new fallen snow, the summit of Mount Hamilton gleams as mist dances about the Main Building.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2X
    Nikkor 200-400 mm f/4.0 zoom lens

    1/250 second @ f/8
    ISO digital: 100
    Native Resolution: 4956x2800 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH4036_Snow Mist Main Building
    1440,525
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH4034_LICK OBSERVATORY SNOW CLOUDS DEPARTING 

     

    2007 February 23

    The Shane 3m Reflector dome glistens in mid-day sunlight as dome ice melts and storm clouds diffuse. The smaller white dome of the 2.4m Automated Planet Finder (APF) is in front of the 3m, and peeking between the two is a glimpse of the Carnegie Astrograph dome. The silver dome to the left houses the Tauchmann 22" Reflector, which is used by Mount Hamilton residents and staff. View is from the Main Building driveway looking east-northeast.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their collaboration and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2X
    Nikkor 18-200 mm f/3.5-5.6 zoomlens
    1/250 second @ f16
    ISO digital: 200
    Native Resolution:
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH4034_LO-Snow Clouds Departing
    742,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7436_LICK OBSERVATORY SNOWY MOONRISE 

     

    2019 February 18

    A waxing gibbous Moon (100% illuminated) rises above the Lick Observatory domes.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their collaboration and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D850
    Nikkor 80-400 f/4.5-5.6 zoom
    1/320 sec @ f/16
    ISO digital: 160
    Native Resolution: 82256x5504 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7436_Lick Observatory Snowy Moonrise
    1440,810
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7336_FRANK DRAKE AND REM STONE UCSC STUDENT TOUR I 

     

    2008 July 22

    Renouned Astronomer and SETI pioneer Frank Drake (left), and Lick Observatory Research Astronomer Remington Stone (right) lead a group of UC Santa Cruz students on a tour of the Observatory. Behind them is the dome of the 36" Great Refractor.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2X
    Nikkor 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    1/1250 second @ f/6.3, 46mm
    ISO digital: 100
    Native Resolution: 4288x2848 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7336_Frank Drake and Rem Stone UCSC Student Tour I
    1440,956
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11

    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA

     

     LH7337_FRANK DRAKE AND REM STONE UCSC STUDENT TOUR II 

     

    2008 July 22

    Renouned Astronomer and SETI pioneer Frank Drake (left), and Lick Observatory Research Astronomer Remington Stone (right) lead a group of UC Santa Cruz students on a tour of the Observatory. Behind them is the dome of the 36" Great Refractor.

    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D2X
    Nikkor 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    1/200 second @ f/11, 24mm
    ISO digital: 125
    Native Resolution: 4288x2848 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.


    FOR MORE INFORMATION

    University of California Observatories

    HamCam

    Lick Observatory Telescopes

    The History of Lick Observatory

     


     

    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.



    FINE ART PRINTS

    Email for size options and price quote

    LICENSING

    Email your inquiry / comment

    LH7337_Frank Drake and Rem Stone UCSC Student Tour II
    1440,956
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11


    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA



    LH7420_MERCURY, VENUS, CRESCENT MOON FROM LICK OBSERVATORY 


    2020 May 23

    This San Francisco Bay view was photographed from Lick Observatory on 4,200-foot Mount Hamilton, spanning a distance of 50 miles line-of-sight. Mercury, Venus, and the crescent Moon are gradually descending toward the horizon as the earth rotates relative to these objects. At far distant right, "Sleeping Lady" Mount Tamalpais is a backdrop for San Francisco, the Golden Gate Bridge, and surrounding Bay Area cities.

    Venus is somewhat fuzzy because its light is diffused by clouds. Although it appears circular in the photograph, disc illumination is only 4%. Mercury is 64% illuminated, and the waxing crescent Moon is 2% illuminated. The lunar crescent appears partially distorted due to a relatively long 4 second exposure and differential refraction.

    Two vertical format frames with the same camera position and settings were shot within moments of each other, then subsequently stitched together in Photoshop to create this panorama.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their collaboration and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.


    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D850
    Nikkor 80-400mm zoom f/4.5-5.6
    4 seconds @ f5.6
    ISO digital equivalent: 800
    Native Resolution: 9480x8224 pixels (including black border)
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.




    FOR MORE INFORMATION


    University of California Observatories


    HamCam


    Lick Observatory Telescopes


    The History of Lick Observatory


     




     


    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.





    FINE ART PRINTS


    Email for size options and price quote


    LICENSING


    Email your inquiry / comment





    LH7423_Mercury, Venus, and Crescent Moon from Lick Observatory
    1800,1099
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11


    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA



    LH7420_MERCURY, VENUS, CRESCENT MOON FROM LICK OBSERVATORY: LOCATIONS 


    2020 May 23

    This San Francisco Bay view was photographed from Lick Observatory on 4,200-foot Mount Hamilton, spanning a distance of 50 miles line-of-sight. Mercury, Venus, and the crescent Moon are gradually descending toward the horizon as the earth rotates relative to these objects. At far distant right, "Sleeping Lady" Mount Tamalpais is a backdrop for San Francisco, the Golden Gate Bridge, and surrounding Bay Area cities.

    Venus is somewhat fuzzy because its light is diffused by clouds. Although it appears circular in the photograph, disc illumination is only 4%. Mercury is 64% illuminated, and the waxing crescent Moon is 2% illuminated. The lunar crescent appears partially distorted due to a relatively long 4 second exposure and differential refraction.

    Two vertical format frames with the same camera position and settings were shot within moments of each other, then subsequently stitched together in Photoshop to create this panorama.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their collaboration and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.


    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D850
    Nikkor 80-400mm zoom f/4.5-5.6
    4 seconds @ f5.6
    ISO digital equivalent: 800
    Native Resolution: 9480x8224 pixels (including black border)
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.




    FOR MORE INFORMATION


    University of California Observatories


    HamCam


    Lick Observatory Telescopes


    The History of Lick Observatory


     




     


    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.





    FINE ART PRINTS


    Email for size options and price quote


    LICENSING


    Email your inquiry / comment





    LH7423_Conjunction of Mercury, Venus, and Crescent Moon from Lic
    1800,1099
    Price On Request
  • 7444_Mt Hamilton Rim of the World Conjunction © 2012 Laurie Hatch, image and text - LICK OBSERVATORY - Mt. Hamilton California - 2012 March 26 The waxing crescent Moon (17% illumination) descends toward the Santa Cruz Mountains rimming Silicon Valley. To the right and just below is the bright planet Venus, and further below, Jupiter. This stretch of Mount Hamilton Road is known as Rim of the World. - Thank you to UCO/Lick Observatory for supporting this documentary endeavor. - A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY - Lick Observatory crowns the 4,200-foot Mt. Hamilton summit above Silicon Valley in central California. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area tycoon and philanthropist James Lick (1796-1876) bequeathed funding for construction which spanned from 1880 to 1887, fulfilling his vision of the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility. In 1959, the Shane 3-meter reflecting telescope was completed on Mt. Hamilton. It continues to provide data for forefront research and engineering programs. In total, the mountain top is home to ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space. - EXPOSURE DATA: Nikon D2X Nikkor 17-35mm f/2.8 zoom 483 sec @ f/5.6 ISO digital: 100 Native Resolution: 2848x4288 pixels Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output. - For more information: http://www.ucolick.org, http://www.ucolick.org/public/telescopes/, info@lauriehatch.com, http://www.lauriehatch.com
    7444_Mt Hamilton Rim of the World Conjunction
    638,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11


    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA



    LH7338_SAN FRANCISCO FOGGY SUNSET FROM MOUNT HAMILTON 


    2016 June 11

    This San Francisco Bay foggy sunset view was photographed from Lick Observatory on 4,200-foot Mount Hamilton, spanning a distance of 50 miles line-of-sight. "Sleeping Lady" Mount Tamalpais is a backdrop for San Francisco, the Golden Gate Bridge, and the Bay Bridge.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their collaboration and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.


    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Nikon D810
    Nikkor 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens
    1/320 second @ f/13, 14mm
    ISO digital: 125
    Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.




    FOR MORE INFORMATION


    University of California Observatories


    HamCam


    Lick Observatory Telescopes


    The History of Lick Observatory


     




     


    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.





    FINE ART PRINTS


    Email for size options and price quote


    LICENSING


    Email your inquiry / comment





    LH7338_San Francisco Foggy Sunset from Mt Hamilton
    1439,960
    Price On Request
  • view in FULL SCREEN toggle F11


    LICK OBSERVATORY
    MOUNT HAMILTON SUMMIT
    CALIFORNIA



    LH7338_SAN FRANCISCO BAY MOONSET FROM MOUNT HAMILTON 


    2006 February 8

    This panorama shows the Moon setting over San Francisco Bay, with its shimmering reflection blazing an ephemeral path across the water. The pano is a composite of twelve frames using the same lens and camera position in one continuous session. Individual frames were tiled together in Photoshop to form a seamless mosaic and also to blend disparate esposure values from very bright to very dark, to more closely represent what I witnessed in the moment of capture.

    The image was photographed at a distance of 70 miles line-of-sight to the San Francisco waterfront through a telephoto lens, from the bedroom window of our home near the Mount Hamilton summit. Although the apparent size of the moon might seem large, it's actually the city which appears very small by comparison in the far distance.

    Red lights outlining Sutro Tower are visible on the left. The Golden Gate Bridge towers are topped by red lights, just to the right of the Moon reflection on the far side of the city. Individual lights on the Bay Bridge cables are at far right. Foreground towers on the right top Mission Peak.

    During the 17 years I lived on Mount Hamilton, sunsets and moonsets with their accompanying Bay water reflections never ceased to amaze me.

    Sincere gratitude is extended to Lick Observatory astronomer colleagues, staff, and friends for their collaboration and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.


    A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY

    Lick Observatory crowns the 4200-foot summit of Mt. Hamilton above central California’s Silicon Valley. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area businessman and philanthropist James Lick funded construction in the 1880’s, envisioning the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility, and also as his memorial and final resting place. Lick is entombed in the base of the Lick 36” Refractor, the most powerful telescope on the planet when built. It remains the world’s second largest refractor. The mountaintop is populated by ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space.

    EXPOSURE DATA

    Landscape:
    Nikon D2X
    Nikkor 200-400 mm f/4.0 telephoto zoom
    15 seconds @ f5.6
    ISO:100

    Moon:
    Nikon D2X
    Nikkor 200-400 mm f/4.0 telephoto zoom
    1/4 second @ f5.6
    ISO:100

    Eight frame blended panorama
    Native Resolution: 4288x13016 pixels
    Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output.

    COPYRIGHT

    All images and text are property of Laurie Hatch Photography; unauthorized use is a violation of copyright law. You are welcome to email me with your useage requests.




    FOR MORE INFORMATION


    University of California Observatories


    HamCam


    Lick Observatory Telescopes


    The History of Lick Observatory


     




     


    Sincere gratitude is extended to University of California Observatories astronomers and staff for their generous and invaluable assistance in producing this photograph.





    FINE ART PRINTS


    Email for size options and price quote


    LICENSING


    Email your inquiry / comment





    LH7421_San Francisco Bay Moonset Seen From Mount Hamilton
    1440,516
    Price On Request
  • LH7440_36" Refractor Window Shutter Smokey Sunset © 20196 Laurie Hatch, image and text - LICK OBSERVATORY - Mt. Hamilton California - 2016 August 19 The sun is setting in the open window of the Lick 36" Great Refractor dome. The ornate brass latching mechanism embodies superb Victorian craftsmanship evi.dent throughout the Main Building. - Thank you to UCO/Lick Observatory for supporting this documentary endeavor. - A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY - Lick Observatory crowns the 4,200-foot Mt. Hamilton summit above Silicon Valley in central California. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area tycoon and philanthropist James Lick (1796-1876) bequeathed funding for construction which spanned from 1880 to 1887, fulfilling his vision of the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility. In 1959, the Shane 3-meter reflecting telescope was completed on Mt. Hamilton. It continues to provide data for forefront research and engineering programs. In total, the mountain top is home to ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space. - EXPOSURE DATA: Nikon D810 Nikkor 28-300 f/4.5-5.6 zoom .4 sec @ f/16 ISO digital: 64 Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output. - For more information: http://www.ucolick.org, http://www.ucolick.org/public/telescopes/, info@lauriehatch.com, http://www.lauriehatch.com
    LH7440_36" Refractor Window Shutter Smokey Sunset
    1440,618
    Price On Request
  • 1440,495
    Price On Request
  • LH7449_Main Building Crescent Moon and Venus Rising © 2014 Laurie Hatch, image and text - LICK OBSERVATORY - Mt. Hamilton California - 2014 June 24 Bright Venus and the waning crescent moon (8% illumination) rise above Mount Hamilton. The iconic Lick Observatory Main Building is to the right. - Thank you to UCO/Lick Observatory for supporting this documentary endeavor. - A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY - Lick Observatory crowns the 4,200-foot Mt. Hamilton summit above Silicon Valley in central California. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area tycoon and philanthropist James Lick (1796-1876) bequeathed funding for construction which spanned from 1880 to 1887, fulfilling his vision of the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility. In 1959, the Shane 3-meter reflecting telescope was completed on Mt. Hamilton. It continues to provide data for forefront research and engineering programs. In total, the mountain top is home to ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space. - EXPOSURE DATA: Nikon D800E Nikkor 200-400mm f/4.0 zoom 1.6 seconds @ f/4.0 ISO digital: 1000 Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output. - For more information: http://www.ucolick.org, http://www.ucolick.org/public/telescopes/, info@lauriehatch.com, http://www.lauriehatch.com
    LH7449_Main Building Crescent Moon and Venus Rising
    1440,548
    Price On Request
  • LH7446_Lick Observatory Shane Dome Moonrise © 2017 Laurie Hatch, image and text - LICK OBSERVATORY - Mt. Hamilton California - 2017 November 14 The waxing gibbous Moon (97% illumination) rises behind the dome of the Shane 3m Reflector, as seen from a location 12 miles away in Silicon Valley California. The iconic Lick Observatory Main Building is at right. - Thank you to UCO/Lick Observatory for supporting this documentary endeavor. - A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY - Lick Observatory crowns the 4,200-foot Mt. Hamilton summit above Silicon Valley in central California. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area tycoon and philanthropist James Lick (1796-1876) bequeathed funding for construction which spanned from 1880 to 1887, fulfilling his vision of the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility. In 1959, the Shane 3-meter reflecting telescope was completed on Mt. Hamilton. It continues to provide data for forefront research and engineering programs. In total, the mountain top is home to ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space. - EXPOSURE DATA: Nikon D810 Nikkor 600mm f/4.0 1/80sec @ f/4.0 ISO digital: 400 Native Resolution: 1920x1383 pixels Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output. - For more information: http://www.ucolick.org, http://www.ucolick.org/public/telescopes/, info@lauriehatch.com, http://www.lauriehatch.com
    LH7446_Lick Observatory Shane Dome Moonrise
    1440,525
    Price On Request
  • LH7446_Lick Observatory Shane Dome Moonrise © 2017 Laurie Hatch, image and text - LICK OBSERVATORY - Mt. Hamilton California - 2017 November 14 The waxing gibbous Moon (97% illumination) rises behind the dome of the Shane 3m Reflector, as seen from a location 12 miles away in Silicon Valley California. The iconic Lick Observatory Main Building is at right. - Thank you to UCO/Lick Observatory for supporting this documentary endeavor. - A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY - Lick Observatory crowns the 4,200-foot Mt. Hamilton summit above Silicon Valley in central California. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area tycoon and philanthropist James Lick (1796-1876) bequeathed funding for construction which spanned from 1880 to 1887, fulfilling his vision of the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility. In 1959, the Shane 3-meter reflecting telescope was completed on Mt. Hamilton. It continues to provide data for forefront research and engineering programs. In total, the mountain top is home to ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space. - EXPOSURE DATA: Nikon D810 Nikkor 600mm f/4.0 1/80sec @ f/4.0 ISO digital: 400 Native Resolution: 1920x1383 pixels Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output. - For more information: http://www.ucolick.org, http://www.ucolick.org/public/telescopes/, info@lauriehatch.com, http://www.lauriehatch.com
    LH7446_Lick Observatory Shane Dome Moonrise
    742,960
    Price On Request
  • LH7446_Lick Observatory Shane Dome Moonrise © 2017 Laurie Hatch, image and text - LICK OBSERVATORY - Mt. Hamilton California - 2017 November 14 The waxing gibbous Moon (97% illumination) rises behind the dome of the Shane 3m Reflector, as seen from a location 12 miles away in Silicon Valley California. The iconic Lick Observatory Main Building is at right. - Thank you to UCO/Lick Observatory for supporting this documentary endeavor. - A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY - Lick Observatory crowns the 4,200-foot Mt. Hamilton summit above Silicon Valley in central California. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area tycoon and philanthropist James Lick (1796-1876) bequeathed funding for construction which spanned from 1880 to 1887, fulfilling his vision of the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility. In 1959, the Shane 3-meter reflecting telescope was completed on Mt. Hamilton. It continues to provide data for forefront research and engineering programs. In total, the mountain top is home to ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space. - EXPOSURE DATA: Nikon D810 Nikkor 600mm f/4.0 1/80sec @ f/4.0 ISO digital: 400 Native Resolution: 1920x1383 pixels Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output. - For more information: http://www.ucolick.org, http://www.ucolick.org/public/telescopes/, info@lauriehatch.com, http://www.lauriehatch.com
    LH7446_Lick Observatory Shane Dome Moonrise
    1394,960
    Price On Request
  • LH7445_Lick Observatory Supermoon Rising © 2016 Laurie Hatch, image and text - LICK OBSERVATORY - Mt. Hamilton California - 2016 November 14 The full Supermoon rises behind the Main Bulding dome of the 36" Great Refractor. Line-of-sight distance is approximately 13 miles. - Thank you to UCO/Lick Observatory for supporting this documentary endeavor. - A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY - Lick Observatory crowns the 4,200-foot Mt. Hamilton summit above Silicon Valley in central California. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area tycoon and philanthropist James Lick (1796-1876) bequeathed funding for construction which spanned from 1880 to 1887, fulfilling his vision of the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility. In 1959, the Shane 3-meter reflecting telescope was completed on Mt. Hamilton. It continues to provide data for forefront research and engineering programs. In total, the mountain top is home to ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space. - EXPOSURE DATA: Nikon D810 Nikkor 600mm f/4.0 1/80sec @ f/4.0 ISO digital: 400 Native Resolution: 1920x1383x4914 pixels Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output. - For more information: http://www.ucolick.org, http://www.ucolick.org/public/telescopes/, info@lauriehatch.com, http://www.lauriehatch.com
    7445_Lick Observatory Supermoon Rising
    1333,960
    Price On Request
  • 7451_Lick Observatory Backlit Cloudy Moonglow © 2019 Laurie Hatch, image and text - LICK OBSERVATORY - Mt. Hamilton California - 2019 February 19 The Moon is rising behind Mount Hamilton, just about to crest on the horizon. Wispy clouds are backlit above the Main Building. At far right is the dome of the Crossley Reflector. - Thank you to UCO/Lick Observatory for supporting this documentary endeavor. - A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY - Lick Observatory crowns the 4,200-foot Mt. Hamilton summit above Silicon Valley in central California. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area tycoon and philanthropist James Lick (1796-1876) bequeathed funding for construction which spanned from 1880 to 1887, fulfilling his vision of the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility. In 1959, the Shane 3-meter reflecting telescope was completed on Mt. Hamilton. It continues to provide data for forefront research and engineering programs. In total, the mountain top is home to ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space. - EXPOSURE DATA: Nikon D850 2-frame stitched panorama Nikkor 80-400 f/4.5-5.6 zoom 30 seconds @ f/6.3 ISO digital: 64 Native Resolution: 8256x5504 pixels Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output. - For more information: http://www.ucolick.org, http://www.ucolick.org/public/telescopes/, info@lauriehatch.com, http://www.lauriehatch.com
    LH7451_Lick Observatory Backlit Cloudy Moonglow
    1440,803
    Price On Request
  • LH7447_Main Building Orion and Sirius © 2017 Laurie Hatch, image and text - LICK OBSERVATORY - Mt.7447_Main Building Orion and Sirius © 2017 Laurie Hatch, image and text - LICK OBSERVATORY - Mt. Hamilton California - 2017 November 14 The constellation Orion is high overhead in this fisheye view of the Main Building foyer and dome of the 36" Great Refractor. Adjacent to the arc of the Milky Way, the bright blue star Sirius gleams above the dome, with Mirzam immediately to the right. - Thank you to UCO/Lick Observatory for supporting this documentary endeavor. - A VIEW FROM LICK OBSERVATORY - Lick Observatory crowns the 4,200-foot Mt. Hamilton summit above Silicon Valley in central California. This research station serves astronomers from University of California campuses and their collaborators worldwide. Eccentric Bay Area tycoon and philanthropist James Lick (1796-1876) bequeathed funding for construction which spanned from 1880 to 1887, fulfilling his vision of the Observatory as a premier astronomical facility. In 1959, the Shane 3-meter reflecting telescope was completed on Mt. Hamilton. It continues to provide data for forefront research and engineering programs. In total, the mountain top is home to ten telescopes which are supported by resident staff and by headquarters at UC Santa Cruz. Acclaimed for academic excellence, technical expertise, and superior instrumentation, Lick Observatory probes the expanding frontiers of space. - EXPOSURE DATA: Nikon D810 Nikkor 8-15mm f/3.5-4.5 fisheye zoom 20 seconds @ f/4.4 ISO digital: 1000 Native Resolution: 7360x4912 pixels Raw image file data were adjusted, optimized, and sharpened for digital output. - For more information: http://www.ucolick.org, http://www.ucolick.org/public/telescopes/, info@lauriehatch.com, http://www.lauriehatch.com Building foyer and dome of the 36" Great Refractor. The bright blue star Sirius gleams above the dome, with Mirzam immediately to the right. - Thank you to UCO/Lic
    LH7447_Main Building Orion
    1439,960
    Price On Request
  • LH7448_Summer Series Red Tele and Swirling Light Trails © 2018 Laurie Hatch, image and text - LICK OBSERVATORY - Mt. Hamilton California - 2018 June 9 Lick Observatory Summer Series, seen through a fisheye lens: This 20 second exposure inside the dome of the Lick 36" Great Refractor records the light-rope path of an observing ladder as it is swirled into position. This venerable chamber is often perceived as a place of transition between everyday life on our planet and mysteries of the universe beyond. Perhaps the experience is described most eloquently by early Lick Director and accomplished astronomer James Keeler in a fascinating article written for the 1888 July 6 issue of 'The Engineer', several months after the behemoth instrument saw first light: "Even the habitually frivolous become thoughtful when they enter the presence of the great telescope." The Summer Series Program series has long been a favorite outing for Bay Area families, with a number of activities ensuring an informative and enjoyable evening. Observing through the Great Refractor is a highlight of the evening. Behind the telescope pier, visitors are seated on the upper level mezzanine. They are awaiting their turn at the eyepiece while listening to a volunteer describe the night's viewing object. The children's parents and Lick Observatory volunteer assistants are standing in the lower foreground. The dome interior is illuminated by red observing lights, which promote dark-adapted vision. The red color is more pronounced in the camera's 4 second time exposure than would appear to the naked eye when one is inside the dome. It is challenging to capture the unique ambiance inside this enormous Victorian vault. Both dome and telescope were technological marvels when built in the late 19th century, and in succeeding decades have seen many seminal discoveries. Occasionally used in its second century for research, this telescope frequently inspires visiting classes and summer visitors with enchan
    LH7448_Summer Series Red Tele and Swirling Light Trails
    641,960
    Price On Request
Click To Enlarge
Exit Enlarged View
Exit Stack View
LICK OBSERVATORY: WHAT'S NEW?
Previous Image
Slide Show
Next Image
LICK OBSERVATORY: WHAT'S NEW?
Image Name - Description
Price Information
Share:
Copyright